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Social Sciences - Master (all)

Political Science

Courses in Political Science are usually only open for incoming exchange students majoring in Political Science and for exchange students at the School of Social Sciences (Sociology, Psychology). Nominated exchange students will be contacted by their departmental exchange coordinator via e-mail at the end of November/early December (fall semester) or by the end of May/early June (Spring semester) regarding their course choice.

Exchange students from other schools and departments may only attend classes if (a) places are left for other students (b) they have basic knowledge in political science and statistics (c) the departmental exchange coordinator explicitly approves their participation. In case of further questions, please contact: int-pol@uni-mannheim.de.

Advanced Topics in Comparative Politics: Game Theory II (Seminar, English)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
10.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Recommended requirement:
Literature:
tba
Examination achievement:
Term paper
Instructor(s):
Description:
This course is a continuation of the intro into Game Theory and covers advanced topics in game theory with a particular emphasis on the link of theories, methods and empirics. At the core, we discuss techniques used to analyse settings of imperfect information and Covered topics include normal form games with incomplete information and Bayesian equilbrium, stochastic games and Markov-perfect equilibrium, behavioral game theory and quantal-response equilibrium, signalling games and cheap talk, information transmission, mechanism design, comparative statics, monotone comparative statics and structural estimation. Emphasis will be placed on prominent applications of those concepts in political science, in both comparative and international politics. As this is a seminar, the course allows students to pursue areas of individual interest in more depth, and therefore course content is to some extent determined based on the interests of the students. The course is partly taught from lecture notes, at other times students present a research paper and stimulate discussion in class.
Advanced Topics in Comparative Politics: Computational Text Analysis (Seminar, English)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
10.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
Description:
https://federiconanni.com/computational-text-analysis/
Advanced Topics in Comparative Politics (Seminar, English)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
10.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Literature:
  • Collier, Paul. 2010. Wars, Guns, and Votes: Democracy in Dangerous Places. Harper Collins.
  • Farrell, David. 2011. Electoral Systems: A Comparative Introduction 2nd. ed. Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Thomassen, Jacques. 2014. Elections and Democracy: Representation and Accountability. Oxford University Press.
Instructor(s):
Description:
Elections are the central focus of political activity in democracies. The characteristics of politics, parties and electoral systems are fundamental to the outcome of elections, which differ across and within countries. To better understand elections we need to study them comparatively, therefore this course focuses on comparative research on elections. The course focuses on the context in which elections are fought and how this affects electoral outcomes. A number of contextual effects of electoral behaviour will be covered, such as institutional configurations, election campaigns, the strategies of political parties and the importance of events in understanding the dynamics of electoral outcomes. We will consider competing theoretical and empirical explanations of the electoral process in democratic as well as partially democratic and even non-democratic countries.
Advanced Topics in Comparative Politics: Political Behavior in Context (Seminar, English)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
10.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
Description:
Outline:
Political behavior takes place in context. This statement is a truism and implies several challenges at the same time. Context is a multidimensional concept comprising – inter alia – social, political, and institutional features. At the theoretical level, the diversity of dimensions requires careful consideration of how to integrate contextual features into individual-level models of political behavior. Moreover, combining data from different levels of aggregation to examine the role of contexts in individual-level behavior raises several methodological issues. In this seminar, we will address the conceptual, theoretical, and methodological issues in the analysis of contextual effects on individual-level political behavior. Students will review the latest empirical studies in the field and prepare research papers in which they analyze specific questions using available data sets.

Office hours: Tuesday, 14.00-15.00
Advanced Topics in International Politics: Globalization and Redistribution (Seminar, English)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
10.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
Description:
Globalization and redistribution This one-semester course introduces MA students to some of the major topics related to the study of redistributive politics in the context of economic interdependence. It examines from an international and comparative political economy perspective why some governments in open economies are more redistributive than others. It covers several key debates about the role of trade and investment on material and other interests, institutions and political parties. Following a brief overview of patterns of openness and redistribution, we start by asking whether and to what extent globalization increases the economic costs and benefits of redistributive policies. We then turn to those factors that shape the political feasibility of redistribution. We begin by presenting standard models of international economics as well as redistribution. We examine how voters form preferences for redistribution in open economies, and extend this framework by exploring the role of partisanship, organised interests and electoral institutions. A final part looks at economic integration as a dependent variable, and considers the links between compensation strategies and the decision to open the economy.
Advanced Topics in International Politics: European Integration, Party Politics and National Populism (Seminar, English)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
10.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Literature:
Caramani, Daniele. 2017. Will vs. Reason: The Populist and Technocratic Forms of Political Representation and Their Critique to Party Government, American Political Science Review 111/1: 54-67.

Hooghe, Liesbet and Garry Marks. 2009. A Postfunctionalist Theory of European Integration: From Permissive Consensus to Constraining Dissensus, British Journal of Political Science 39/1: 1-23.

König, Thomas and Bern Luig. 2017. The Impact of EU decision-making on national parties’ attitudes towards European Integration, European Union Politics 18/3: 362-381.

König, Thomas, Moritz Marbach and Moritz Osnabrügge, 2017. Left/Right or U? Estimating the Dimensionality of National Party Competition in Europe, The Journal of Politics 79/3: 1101-1105.
Tsebelis, George and Geoffrey Garrett. 2001. The Institutional Foundations of Intergovernmentalism, International Organization 55/2: 357-390.
Instructor(s):
Description:
This course will focus on the recent developments in European politics from both a European integration and comparative politics perspective. The first round of sessions concerns the recent history of European integration since the Maastricht Treaty came into force in 1993. This period is characterized by institutional change with the empowering of the European Parliament and the transfer of policy competencies from the national to the EU level, such as monetary, immigration and asylum policies. Another characteristic of this period relate to the economic and debt crisis, the Brexit vote, and the accession of Central and Eastern European countries. The second round of sessions is devoted to the implications of this history for party politics and national populism in the member states. In addition to the European elections, particular attention will be on cross-country analyses of national elections and public support. Further topics include the rise of Euroskeptic parties, which enter into governmental office.

Participants are expected to write a paper, preferably with an empirical study on these topics. The main goals of the course are to sharpen analytical, presentation, and writing skills with a focus on the interplay between European integration and the recent developments in party politics and national populism in the member states.

Office hours: to be determined
Advanced Topics in International Politics: Violence, conflict and the prospect for peace (Seminar, English)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
10.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
Description:
This seminar focuses on the outbreak and the dynamics of violent conflict as well as ways to end wars and sustain peace and stability. We will start by looking at the concepts of “peace” and “war” and examine empirical trends. Is the world more violent or more peaceful than in the past? How can we measure peace and conflict? In the following we will take a closer look at the relationship between religion and war, as well as economics and war. Does religion cause war? Or are economic factors more important for explaining why people fight? We will devote sessions to study terrorism as an alternative way of fighting (as opposed to conventional and civil wars), migration as a source of peace and conflict and the various forms of violence used by different militant groups. Why are some groups so much more violent than others? What is the rational behind using different forms of violence?  Finally we will have a look at empirical evidence concerning ways to end conflicts and sustain peace. Are peace missions for example an effective tool to make and sustain peace? Does development assistance foster development? The seminar is designed to provide MA-students with an in-depth insight into peace and conflict research. We will thereby answer (if possible) practical questions with scientific examinations and evidence.
Methods in Empirical Social Sciences: Meta-Analysis (Seminar, English)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
7.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
Description:
Prerequisites:
B.Sc.-level statistics / research methods course (at least two years of training)
Course description:
In a nutshell, meta-analysis can be described as a set of statistical methods for aggregating, summarizing, and drawing inferences from collections of thematically related studies. The key idea is to quantify the size, direction, and/or strength of an effect, and to cancel out sampling errors associated with individual studies. Meta-analytic techniques have become the standard methods for aggregating the results from thematically related studies in the social and behavioral sciences. They can be used to describe a research field, to test and/or compare theories on a high level of abstraction, and to derive conclusions about the effectiveness of interventions.
The overall goal of this course is to provide a hands-on introduction into the different approaches belonging to the umbrella term ´meta-analysis´, to sketch their conceptual foundations, and to point participants to special issues and problems when evaluating and/or conducting meta-analytic studies. Moreover, each and every of the following topics addressed will be accompanied by exercises:
• What kind of scientific and applied research problems can be addressed meta-analytically?
• Big picture: The meta-analytic research cycle
• Meta-analytic models: Hedges/Olkin, Hunter/Schmidt (Psychometric), and Bayesian Approaches
• Problem statement: Framing meta-analytic research questions
• Systematically retrieving relevant primary studies: Literature research and selection
• Extracting information from primary studies: Coding
• Effect sizes: Basic types, estimation, conversion, and approximation strategies
• Synthesizing the evidence: Mean effect size computation, moderator analysis techniques
• Special issues: Dependent effect sizes, publication bias, study quality
• Interpretation and reporting
• Case studies from various fields (tailored towards the academic backgrounds of the participants)
Data and Measurement (Lecture, English)
Lecture type:
Lecture
ECTS:
6.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
Description:
Usual course dates and locations

Lectures: Tuesdays, 8.30-10.00, B6 23-25, room A102
Tutorials: Tuesdays, 10.15-11.45, A5, 6, room C-108

Classes start on 4th September and end on 4th December.
Depending on teaching needs and room availabilities, lectures and tutorials may be swapped, such that two lectures or two tutorial take place on one day within the time slots allocated to the course, i.e. on Tuesdays, 8.30 – 11.45. Such swaps will be announced before the beginning of the semester.

Summary

This course gives an overview of data used in political science and their measurement properties. At the beginning of the course we will focus on survey data and traditional statistics and move to data science approaches for big data towards the end of the course. Topics covered include the Total Survey Error (TSE) framework, operationalizing research questions, guidelines for writing survey questions, testing questions with cognitive interviews and eye-tracking, sampling, coverage, and nonresponse of survey and big data, and data analytics approaches in data science.

The course is mandatory for students of the M.A. in Political Science and consists of lectures (6 ECTS) and tutorials (2 ECTS). During the lectures the theory covered in the course readings is discussed. The tutorials offer hands-on practice and experience during individual and group exercises.
Game Theory (Lecture, English)
Lecture type:
Lecture
ECTS:
6.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Recommended requirement:
Literature:
tba
Examination achievement:
Midterm and a final exam
Instructor(s):
Description:
The objective of this course is to provide students with the basics of formal modeling in political science. The course has some breadth in coverage in the sense that it provides a graduate-level introduction and overview to di erent areas in game theory. It is also narrow in the sense that the emphasis is not on application and model testing but getting trained in reading and writing down formal models. At the conceptual level the course will cover the following topics: normal form games, Nash equilibria, extensive form games, subgame perfect equilibria, repeated games, bargaining, games with incomplete and imperfect information, Bayesian perfect equilibria, signaling games, preferences and individual choices, basics of decision theory and social choice. At the substantial level, we will use these concepts to study, as examples, candidate competition, political lobbying, and war and deterrence.
Multivariate Analyses (Lecture, English)
Lecture type:
Lecture
ECTS:
6.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
Description:
The course introduces students to quantitative methods in political science. During the first half of the course, we will focus on linear regression models. The topics covered include discussions of the mathematical bases for such models, their estimation and interpretation, model assumptions and techniques for addressing violations of those assumptions, and topics related to model specification and functional forms. During the second half of the course, students will be introduced to likelihood as a theory of inference, including models for binary and count data.

The main goals of this course are to develop sound critical judgment about quantitative studies of political problems, to understand the logic of statistical inference, to recognize and understand the basics of the linear regression model, to develop the skills necessary to work with datasets to perform basic quantitative analyses, and to provide a basis of knowledge for more advanced statistical methods.

In the accompanying course “Tutorial Multivariate Analyses” students will develop the necessary expertise in using statistical software to conduct quantitative research in political science.
Research Design (Lecture, English)
Lecture type:
Lecture
ECTS:
6.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Literature:
  • King, Gary; Keohane, Robert Owen; Verba, Sidney. 1994. Designing Social Inquiry : Scientific Inference in Qualitative Research. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press
  • Henry E. Brady and David Collier (Hrsg). 2004: Rethinking social inquiry: diverse tolls, shared standards. Lanham [u.a.]: Rowman& Littlefield
  • Thomas Gschwend, Frank Schimmelfennig (Hrsg). 2007: Research Design in Political Science: How to practice what they preach? Houndmills: Palgrave MacMillan.
  • Kellstedt, Paul and Guy Whitten. 2009: The Fundamentals of Political Research, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Instructor(s):
Description:
All researchers face similar challenges posed by core issues of research design. A research design is a plan that specifies how you plan to carry out a research project and, particularly, how you expect to use your evidence to answer your research question. This course aims to provide an overview of potential research designs for establishing causal inference and their advantages and disadvantages. Students should also understand the trade-offs involved in choosing a particular research design. Students are expected to have their own ideas about potential research questions to be able to actively participate in seminar-style meetings that are organised within this lecture course.
Selected Topics in Comparative Politics (Seminar, English)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
7.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
Tutorial Data and Measurement (Seminar, English)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
2.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
Description:
Usual course dates and locations

Lectures: Tuesdays, 8.30-10.00, B6 23-25, room A102
Tutorials: Tuesdays, 10.15-11.45, A5, 6, room C-108

Classes start on 4th September and end on 4th December.
Depending on teaching needs and room availabilities, lectures and tutorials may be swapped, such that two lectures or two tutorial take place on one day within the time slots allocated to the course, i.e. on Tuesdays, 8.30 – 11.45. Such swaps will be announced before the beginning of the semester.

Summary

This course gives an overview of data used in political science and their measurement properties. At the beginning of the course we will focus on survey data and traditional statistics and move to data science approaches for big data towards the end of the course. Topics covered include the Total Survey Error (TSE) framework, operationalizing research questions, guidelines for writing survey questions, testing questions with cognitive interviews and eye-tracking, sampling, coverage, and nonresponse of survey and big data, and data analytics approaches in data science.

The course is mandatory for students of the M.A. in Political Science and consists of lectures (6 ECTS) and tutorials (2 ECTS). During the lectures the theory covered in the course readings is discussed. The tutorials offer hands-on practice and experience during individual and group exercises.
Tutorial Game Theory (Seminar, English)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
2.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
Description:
This tutorial accompanies the graduate-level introductory lecture in game theory. Its main objective is to practice solution concepts for static and dynamic games of complete and incomplete information.The contents are centered around the material covered in the lecture. Thus, the following key areas will be discussed: preferences and individual choices, decision theory, normal form games, Nash equilibria, extensive form games, subgame perfect equilibria, repeated games, bargaining, games with incomplete and imperfect information, Bayesian perfect equilibria, signalling games. At the substantial level, we will use these concepts to study, for instance, candidate competition, political lobbying, and war and deterrence. Students are required to submit weekly problem sets. Moreover, active participation in class discussions is expected.
Tutorial Multivariate Analyses (PO 14) (Seminar, English)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
2.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
Description:
This tutorial accompanies the course “Multivariate Analyses” in the M.A. program in Political Science. The lab sessions will focus on the practical issues associated with quantitative methods, including obtaining and preparing data sets, how to use statistical software, which tests to use for different kinds of problems, how to graph data effectively for presentation and analysis, and how to interpret results. The seminar will also serve as a software tutorial. No prior knowledge of statistical programming is expected.
Tutorial Multivariate Analyses (PO 14) (Seminar, English)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
2.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
Description:
This tutorial accompanies the course “Multivariate Analyses” in the M.A. program in Political Science. The lab sessions will focus on the practical issues associated with quantitative methods, including obtaining and preparing data sets, how to use statistical software, which tests to use for different kinds of problems, how to graph data effectively for presentation and analysis, and how to interpret results. The seminar will also serve as a software tutorial. No prior knowledge of statistical programming is expected.

Sociology

Courses in Sociology are usually only open for incoming exchange students majoring in Sociology and for exchange students at the School of Social Sciences (Political Science, Psychology). Nominated exchange students will be contacted by their departmental exchange coordinator via e-mail at the end of November/early December (fall semester) or by the end of May/early June (Spring semester) regarding their course choice.

Exchange students from other schools and departments may only attend classes if (a) places are left for other students (b) they have basic knowledge in sociology and statistics (c) the departmental exchange coordinator explicitly approves their participation. In case of further questions, please contact: int-soc@uni-mannheim.de.

Methods in Empirical Social Sciences: Meta-Analysis (Seminar, English)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
7.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
Description:
Prerequisites:
B.Sc.-level statistics / research methods course (at least two years of training)
Course description:
In a nutshell, meta-analysis can be described as a set of statistical methods for aggregating, summarizing, and drawing inferences from collections of thematically related studies. The key idea is to quantify the size, direction, and/or strength of an effect, and to cancel out sampling errors associated with individual studies. Meta-analytic techniques have become the standard methods for aggregating the results from thematically related studies in the social and behavioral sciences. They can be used to describe a research field, to test and/or compare theories on a high level of abstraction, and to derive conclusions about the effectiveness of interventions.
The overall goal of this course is to provide a hands-on introduction into the different approaches belonging to the umbrella term ´meta-analysis´, to sketch their conceptual foundations, and to point participants to special issues and problems when evaluating and/or conducting meta-analytic studies. Moreover, each and every of the following topics addressed will be accompanied by exercises:
• What kind of scientific and applied research problems can be addressed meta-analytically?
• Big picture: The meta-analytic research cycle
• Meta-analytic models: Hedges/Olkin, Hunter/Schmidt (Psychometric), and Bayesian Approaches
• Problem statement: Framing meta-analytic research questions
• Systematically retrieving relevant primary studies: Literature research and selection
• Extracting information from primary studies: Coding
• Effect sizes: Basic types, estimation, conversion, and approximation strategies
• Synthesizing the evidence: Mean effect size computation, moderator analysis techniques
• Special issues: Dependent effect sizes, publication bias, study quality
• Interpretation and reporting
• Case studies from various fields (tailored towards the academic backgrounds of the participants)
Ü Cross Sectional Data Analysis (Scientific exercise, English)
Lecture type:
Scientific exercise
ECTS:
3
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Recommended requirement:
Literature:
You will find exercises, solutions, data, and additional literature on ILIAS.
Examination achievement:
Credits (3 ECTSP) are awarded on the presentation of the assignment solution and an active participation. Passing the lab session
counts as “Studienleistung” for the lecture. Participation in the final exam of the lecture is therefore subject to having passed the lab session.
Instructor(s):
Description:
Organization: Lab sessions will repeat and practice topics from the lecture based on weekly exercises. These exercises follow the lecture, so that you will have a week to solve each exercise. We will do some applied exercises by hand and use the statistical package Stata. Regular lab sessions will start at (tba).

The goal of the lab session is:
a) to practice the topics you learned in applied form
b) offer a opportunity for questions, and
c) give you and discuss with you hands-on approaches for your further empirical work (e.g. graphical representation of results).
Ü Cross Sectional Data Analysis (Scientific exercise, English)
Lecture type:
Scientific exercise
ECTS:
3
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Recommended requirement:
Literature:
You will find exercises, solutions, data, and additional literature on ILIAS.
Examination achievement:
Credits (3 ECTSP) are awarded on the presentation of the assignment solution and an active participation. Passing the lab session
counts as “Studienleistung” for the lecture. Participation in the final exam of the lecture is therefore subject to having passed the lab session.
Instructor(s):
Description:
Organization: Lab sessions will repeat and practice topics from the lecture based on weekly exercises. These exercises follow the lecture, so that you will have a week to solve each exercise. We will do some applied exercises by hand and use the statistical package Stata. Regular lab sessions will start at (tba).

The goal of the lab session is:
a) to practice the topics you learned in applied form
b) offer a opportunity for questions, and
c) give you and discuss with you hands-on approaches for your further empirical work (e.g. graphical representation of results).
VL Foundations of Sociological Theory (Lecture, English)
Lecture type:
Lecture
ECTS:
6.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Learning target:
Basic understanding of the methodology of sociological explanations; knowledge of key sociological theories and theoretical tools; skills to evaulate the quality, especially the information content, of theoretical statements; awareness of the challanges of the theory-data link; critical assement of the theory-guidance of empirical research.
Literature:
Introductory readings are :

Della Porta, D., and Keating, M. (eds.) (2008). Approaches and Methodologies in the Social Sicenes. A Pluralist Perspective. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Hedström, Peter (2005). Dissecting the social: On the principles of analytical sociology. Cambridge University Press.

Little, Daniel, Varieties of Social Explanation. An Introduction to the Philosophy of Social Science, Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1991.

A more detailed reading list will be provided in the first session.
Examination achievement:
Klausur (90 Minuten)
Instructor(s):
Description:
This lecture introduces incoming students to the fundamental principles of (social) science, different theoretical paradigms in sociology, and empirical-analytical sociological research on social mechanisms. First, as an introduction into the epistemological foundations of social sciences, we will address key insights of the philosophy of sciences, sociological theory and analytic sociology on social mechanism. What is a reasonable (causal) explanation of social phenomena and how can it be verified? Furthermore, we will study the different paradigms in the social sciences and in particular important variants of sociological theory ranging from interpretative approaches to rational choice theory. In how far are these complementary or do these represent disparate perspectives? Finally, actual sociological applications of analytical sociology studying particular social mechanisms will be discussed.
Ü Foundations of Sociological Theory (Scientific exercise, English)
Lecture type:
Scientific exercise
ECTS:
3.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Learning target:
Learning goals
The main aim of the course is to sharpen students’ ability to evaluate theoretical sociological explanations. At the end of the course, students’ should be better prepared to develop sociological explanations themselves in order to address research problems of their own choice.
 
Recommended requirement:
Literature:
will be announced
Instructor(s):
Description:
Course description
The methodological toolbox that is available to social scientists has considerably increased in recent years. Unfortunately, however, this increased methodological precision is not always accompanied by theoretical precision. In this course, we aim to shift attention from identifying causal mechanisms empirically to theorizing about them.
For this purpose, we discuss how selected exemplary studies tackle the key questions of applied sociological theorizing. Roughly speaking, we proceed in three steps. In a first step, we ask what, exactly, the scientific or social problem under study and the related research question is. This question may sound almost trivial, but it is not, given that everything else depends on a clear understanding of the underlying problem. After establishing the explanandum, our second step is to examine the theoretical explanation that the authors offers to explain the observed phenomena or pattern. In order to do so, we discuss the (sometimes hidden) assumptions and scope conditions of respective theories. We also discuss how convincing these theoretical explanations are, what observable implications they have, and how the authors test these implications empirically. In the final step, we assess whether the study has succeeded in advancing our (theoretical) understanding of the problem it sought to address.
FS Research Project (Research seminar, English)
Lecture type:
Research seminar
ECTS:
6
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
Description:
The main purpose of this research seminar is to lay the groundwork for your master thesis. To this end, the seminar follows a workshop format. It is primarily an opportunity for you to identify a substantive research question, find suitable data sources to answer it, and to develop an appropriate research design and framing of your thesis project. We will have multiple rounds of presentations of your projects over the course of the semester. At each round, we will discuss the latest version and offer constructive feedback, thus improving the thesis projects as we move forward.
FS Research Project (Research seminar, English)
Lecture type:
Research seminar
ECTS:
6
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
Description:
The aim of this research seminar is to conduct an analysis of secondary data and to write a short research paper on a topic relevant to family sociology. Students can choose the topic on their own and can either opt for a replication of a published research paper or work on an original research paper.

In the first session we will discuss the value of replication in social research and how to a select a research question. In the following sessions the instructor will briefly introduce two to three datasets (depending on the research interests of the participating students) which are particularly suitable for addressing family related research questions (e.g., SOEP; The German Family Panel (pairfam); Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe (SHARE); Health and Retirement Study (HRS)). One or two additional sessions will deal with the workflow of data analysis using Stata/R (focus on writing accessible and effective do-files). In the remaining weeks of the seminar the students are working on their research projects. Students will develop hypotheses, write a review of research related to these hypotheses and conduct an empirical test using secondary data.

At the beginning of the semester classes will take place on a weekly basis. Later in the semester some regular classes will be replaced by individual appointments with the instructor. During the semester students will present and discuss the progress of their research project in class.
VL Research Design (Lecture, English)
Lecture type:
Lecture
ECTS:
4
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
Ü Research Design (Scientific exercise, English)
Lecture type:
Scientific exercise
ECTS:
3.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
S Elective Seminar: Comparative - Historical Sociology (Seminar, English)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
6
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
Description:
The aim of this course is to introduce students to major strands in comparative-historical analysis in the social sciences. Topics include (but are not limited to) the formation of nation-states in early modern Europe; how such early modern states contrast with the social order of feudal society; the causes and consequences of revolutions; how conflicts among political elites shape the course of modern states; how climate, geography, cultural developments, politics and overseas trade come together to shape societies at large; but also how ordinary people in the past saw and imagined the world around them. We will consider these and other topics by drawing upon classic works in large-scale comparative studies, the Annales School, micro-history, historical anthropology, and studies of historical networks. One caveat: students planning to take this class should be prepared to consider empirical examples that come from rather exotic societies, remote in place and time from our contemporary society.
S Elective Seminar: Experts and public problems (Seminar, English)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
6
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
Description:
Experts shape everyday life with arcane knowledge that the public has no full understanding of, and consequentially cannot control. While many still regard doctors, lawyers and even obscure scientists highly for their services, this trust rapidly erodes in other groups. This course uncovers organizational arrangements of expert knowledge and asks how arcane expertise shapes public and private life. We investigate this relationship in three problem areas: (1) Free professions and bureaucratic occupations, including law and economics, as well as the EU and IMF; (2) health and science, including medicine, mental health, autism and AIDS; and (3) technology and the Internet, including power plants, programmers and data science. Across these empirical settings we analyze different processes by which abstract knowledge gains lay salience: Informal relationships between mentors and students, or doctors and patients; formal organizations, ranging from labs and firms to governments and NGOs; and occupations, which regulate medical doctors, architects and others; and we finally ask whether expertise could unfold systematically outside of specific relationships and institutionalized boundaries, such as in open discourse and arguments. On the basis of these processes we aim to understand today’s transition from bureaucratic to technological contexts of knowledge production and application.
S Elective Seminar: Social Policy and Inequality (Seminar, English)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
6
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
Description:
Course description

Life course sociology deals with individuals’ pathways through life and analyzes determinates and consequences of their life course transitions and trajectories, their biographical decisions and expectations. Most prominent topics cover employment history and family life, income and poverty risks over the life cycle, and transitions from school to work and from work to retirement. Individuals’ life courses do not look the same all over the world, but are influenced by the social policy, economy, and cultural values in a country. In life course sociology, welfare state policies and intuitions are perceived as main structuring forces of individuals’ life course. For example, people in Germany regally retire in their mid-60s, whereas Americans tend to continue working longer.

The seminar will focus on cross-national differences in welfare states and individuals’ life courses in Europe. We will first get to know relevant theoretical approaches and scientific debates: What cross-national differences exist in welfare states in Europe? Why is the welfare state important for individuals’ life course decisions and how do researchers explain effects of social policy in different life stages? In what way do life courses change over time? Can we identify ‘life course regimes’ in Europe?

Second, the seminar will focus on recent empirical studies that compare individuals’ life courses in different European countries. Students then work on a “Team Project” focusing on life courses and the welfare state in one specific European country.

S Vertiefungsmodul/Wahlmodul A: Bereich Familie, Bildung & Arbeitsmarkt: Empirical Family Research (Seminar, English)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
6
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
Description:
Sociology of the life course In sociological research, the life course refers to the sequence of states and events in all possible life domains. Individuals go through a large number of different stages during their life from birth to death. However, the single trajectories can vary greatly. While one person starts education, leaves the parental home at age 18, enters the labor market, stops working, has a first schild and gets married, another person might remain in education for a very long time, enters the labor market and has a child only in the early 40s. But why do life courses differ? The seminar is intended to introduce students to basic concepts of the life course and recent research findings.
S Elective Seminar: Learning Social Research through Replication (Seminar, English)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
6
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Examination achievement:

Participants should choose a published paper and try to replicate the findings reported in it using the same data. The results to be replicated often will be given in a table containing the outcome of a multivariate model. Please document each step in your attempt to replicate the findings, report and explain the decisions you had to make during data preparation and data analysis. If you fail to replicate the results please indicate possible explanations. Your paper should not exceed 10,000 words; please add your documented syntax in the appendix.

Instructor(s):
Description:

Description

In addition to a thorough understanding of the substantive field you are studying you need firm methodological and statistical knowledge in order to successfully conduct quantitative social research. This seminar will give you the opportunity to apply and expand your knowledge of social research by replicating published research findings.

The research that we are going to replicate was conducted with data from publicly available survey data like the European Social Survey (ESS), the International Social Survey Programme (ISSP) or the European Values Study (EVS). Data from surveys like these have several advantages: the surveys follow a repeated cross-section design, a research design particularly well suited to study social change; they are comparative surveys allowing you to compare data cross-nationally on a broad range of topics; the surveys follow rigorous methodological standards and, finally, data are available at no cost and can be downloaded from the web.

Replicating published research has the advantage that you are able to check your results against existing results. By trying to replicate previous research you learn where the original researcher has made tacit decisions not documented in the paper (e.g. defining the analysis sample, coding of variables, treatment of missing values). Replicating social research also trains you to judge the validity of research results.

In addition to these primarily pedagogical aspects replicating research is important from an epistemological point of view as well. Through replication of research by independent research groups biases in previous work can be discovered and findings can be validated (see Hendrick 1991, King 1995).

Psychology

Courses in Psychology are usually only open for incoming exchange students majoring in Psychology. Nominated exchange students will be contacted by their departmental exchange coordinator via e-mail at the end of November/early December (fall semester) or by the end of May/early June (Spring semester) regarding their course choice.

Exchange students from other schools and departments may only attend classes if (a) places are left for other students (b) they have basic knowledge in psychology and statistics (c) the departmental exchange coordinator explicitly approves their participation. In case of further questions, please contact: int-psy@uni-mannheim.de.

AA1/BA1: Multivariate Auswertungsverfahren (Lecture, German)
Lecture type:
Lecture
ECTS:
4.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
German
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
Description:
In dieser Vorlesung werden die formalen Grundlagen und zentralen Verfahren der multivariaten Statistik eingeführt und empirisch illustriert. Dabei werden zunächst die multiple Regression, das Allgemeine Lineare Modell und die Mehrebenenanalyse behandelt. Darauf aufbauend werden multivariate Auswertungsverfahren für Mittelwertsvergleiche und zur Diskrimination sowie Verfahren der exploratorischen Faktorenanalyse vorgestellt. Abschließend erfolgt eine Einführung in lineare Strukturgleichungsmodelle.

Zu den einzelnen Verfahren werden die mathematischen Grundlagen dargelegt und Anwendungsmöglichkeiten und Einsatzgebiete in der psychologischen Forschung diskutiert. Als optionale Vertiefung zu der Vorlesung wird ein Seminar als Wahlveranstaltung im Modul AC bzw. BC angeboten, in dem die konkrete Anwendung der Verfahren und die Interpretation der Ergebnisse anhand empirischer Datensätze eingeübt werden können.
AB1/BB1: Testen und Entscheiden (Lecture, German)
Lecture type:
Lecture
ECTS:
4.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
German
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
Description:
Inhalt:
Ausgewählte Verfahren der Leistungs- und Persönlichkeitsdiagnostik, Strategien der Diagnostik, mögliche Fehlerarten, rechtliche und gesellschaftliche Rahmenbedingungen sowie Kosten-Nutzen-Analysen der diagnostischen Entscheidung und Klassifikation.

Teilnehmer:
keine Teilnehmerbegrenzung.

Anmeldung:
Die Anmeldung erfolgt im Studierendenportal.

Sprechstunde:
s. http://www.psychologie.uni-mannheim.de/psycho2/wagener.html

Link zur Veranstaltungsseite:
www.psychologie.uni-mannheim.de/te
AD1/BD6: Vertiefung Klinische Psychologie und Psychopathologie (Lecture, German)
Lecture type:
Lecture
ECTS:
4.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
German
Hours per week:
2
Examination achievement:
Klausur (90 Min)
Instructor(s):
Description:
Diese Ringvorlesung vermittelt vertiefte Kenntnisse zu Diagnostik, Ätiologie sowie Störungs- und Behandlungswissen der Klinischen Psychologie und Psychopathologie des Kindes-, Jugend- und Erwachsenenalters. Zu den behandelten Themengebieten gehört u.a. die kritische Auseinandersetzung mit der klassifikatorischen Diagnostik und mit aktuellen Kontroversen der Klinische Psychologie. Darüber hinaus befassen sich die Teilnehmerinnen und Teilnehmer mit aktuellen Forschungstätigkeiten und etablierten Forschungsmethoden aus ausgewählten Bereichen der Klinischen Psychologie und Psychopathologie.
AE1/BD5: Advanced topics in cognitive psychology (Bröder) (Lecture, English)
Lecture type:
Lecture
ECTS:
4.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
Description:
The lecture will present cutting edge research conducted in Cognitive Psychology at the University of Mannheim.
After an introductory overview of Cognitive Psychology and its advanced methods by A. Bröder, various researchers will present their current work. The following reseacrher are planned as lecturers (changes possible): Dr. Nina Arnold, Dr. Martin Brandt, Prof. A. Bröder, Prof. E. Erdfelder, Dr. Michael Gräf, Dr. Meike Kroneisen, Dr. Lena Naderevic, Prof. Rüdiger Pohl und Dr. Monika Undorf.

Final test: written exam (M.Sc. students), language German or English.

Die Vorlesung wird verschiedene Forschungsthemen der Kognitiven Psychologie anhand der aktuell in Mannheim betriebenen kognitionspsychologischen Forschung vertiefen.
Nach einem einführenden Überblick über die Kognitionspsychologie und spezifische methodische Probleme (4-5 Termine, gestaltet durch A. Bröder) werden in Form einer Ringvorlesung aktuelle Forschungen der Lehrstühle für Allgemeine Psychologie und für Kognitive und Differentielle Psychologie vorgestellt.  Die Dozentinnen und Dozenten sind voraussichtlich: Dr. Nina Arnold, Dr. Martin Brandt, Prof. A. Bröder, Prof. E. Erdfelder, Dr. Michael Gräf, Dr. Meike Kroneisen, Dr. Lena Naderevic, Prof. Rüdiger Pohl und Dr. Monika Undorf.
Prüfungsleistung: Klausur
Empfohlen für: Studierende des Masterprogramms Kognitive und Klinische Psychologie (1. Semester) und des Masterprogramms Arbeit, Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft (3. Semester)
AE3: Schwerpunkte der kognitionspsychologischen Forschung: Formale kognitive Modellierung in der klinischen Psychologie (Kuhlmann) (Seminar, German)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
4.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
German
Hours per week:
2
Literature:
wird in der Veranstaltung bekannt gegeben
Instructor(s):
Description:
Beschreibung:
 

Verhaltensdaten aus kognitiven Aufgaben (z. B. korrekte Antworten in einem Gedächtnistest, Reaktionszeiten) konfundieren verschiedene kognitive Prozesse (z.B. Nichterinnern aufgrund von Enkodierungs- und/oder Abrufschwierigkeiten?). Formale Modellierungsansätze ermöglichen es, verschiedene an kognitiver Leistung beteiligte Prozesse getrennt zu messen. Ein besonderer Vorteil in der Anwendung solcher Modellierungsansätze ergibt sich, wenn die kognitiven Defizite bestimmter Populationen besser verstanden werden sollen. Zum Beispiel ermöglichen diese Methoden eine Unterscheidung zwischen kognitiven Prozessen, die durch eine klinische Pathologie beeinträchtigt sind, und solchen, die trotz Pathologie intakt sind. Daraus ergeben sich Möglichkeiten zur Intervention und Behandlung. In diesem Seminar sollen verschiedene formale Modellierungsansätze für kognitive Daten kennengelernt werden und ihre Vorteile in der Anwendung zur Untersuchung verschiedener kognitiv-klinischer Fragestellungen und klinischer Populationen (z.B. Patienten mit Schizophrenie, ältere Erwachsene mit Alzheimer Demenz) demonstriert werden. Der Fokus liegt dabei auf den psychologischen Inhalten dieser Modelle, nicht auf den mathematischen Details.

AE3: Schwerpunkte der kognitionspsychologischen Forschung: Metakognitionsforschung (Undorf) (Seminar, German)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
German
Literature:
Wird in der Veranstaltung bekanntgegeben.
Instructor(s):
Description:
Inhalt:
Option A oder Option B? Schuldig oder unschuldig? Richtig oder falsch? Menschen müssen tagtäglich viele verschiedene Urteile fällen und Entscheidungen treffen. In diesem Seminar sollen aktuelle kognitionspsychologische Theorien, Modelle und Befunde aus der Urteils- und Entscheidungsforschung behandelt werden. Dabei erwerben die Teilnehmerinnen und Teilnehmer unter anderem einen Überblick zu folgenden Themen: Soziale Urteilstheorie, Urteilsheuristiken und Urteilsfehler, Häufigkeits- und Wahrscheinlichkeitsurteile, Wahrheitsurteile, Moralurteile, Entscheidungen unter Unsicherheit, Entscheidungsstrategien, sowie intuitive und emotionsbasierte Entscheidungen. Im Fokus des Seminars stehen dabei aktuelle Publikationen zur Urteils- und Entscheidungsforschung, die im Rahmen von Referaten vorgestellt werden sollen und anschließend gemeinsam kritisch evaluiert und diskutiert werden sollen. Aufbauend auf diesen kritischen Überlegungen sollen neue Ideen für zukünftige Untersuchungen generiert werden.

Empfohlen für:
Studierende im M.Sc. Psychologie im 2. Fachsemester.

Erworben werden kann:
Leistungsnachweis gemäß der Prüfungsordnung für den Studiengang M.Sc. Psychologie.

Anmeldung:
Über das Studierendenportal

Sprechstunde:
Nach Vereinbarung
AG1/BD1: Advanced Industrial and Organizational Psychology (Lecture, English)
Lecture type:
Lecture
ECTS:
4.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Registration procedure:
PSYCHOLOGY EXCHANGE STUDENTS will be contacted by the international affairs coordinator for Psychology (int-psych@uni-mannheim.de) via mail to indicate their course preferences.

NON-PSYCHOLOGY EXCHANGE STUDENTS may solely attend if (a) places are left (b) students posses basic knowledge in Psychology and statistics (c) the docent approves participation. For applications please contact the international affairs coordinator for Psychology (int-psych@uni-mannheim.de).
Recommended requirement:
Literature:
Journal papers; reading assignments will be given at the beginning of the semester.
Instructor(s):
Description:
This course provides an overview of core topic within work and organizational psychology. We will focus on recent theoretical approaches and empirical research findings. In addition, we will discuss practical implications. Topics include: Work motivation, stress and health, leadership, teams, personnel selection.
AG2/BD2: Vertiefung Konsumentenpsychologie und Ökonomische Psychologie (Lecture, German)
Lecture type:
Lecture
ECTS:
4.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
German
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
AG4/BD4: Vertiefung Sozialpsychologie (Lecture, German)
Lecture type:
Lecture
ECTS:
4.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
German
Hours per week:
1
Literature:
Literatur: Wird in der Veranstaltung bekannt gegeben.
Instructor(s):
Description:
Inhalt:
In der Veranstaltung sollen aufbauend auf dem im Bachelorstudiengang erworbenen Wissen ausgewählte Forschungsgebiete vertiefend behandelt werden. Im Einzelnen können Themen behandelt werden wie Umfrageforschung/ Kontexteffekte in Fragebogen, Subjektives Wohlbefinden (Glück und Zufriedenheit), Sozialpsychologie und Recht, Sozialpsychologie von Mann und Frau.

Literatur: Wird in der Veranstaltung bekannt gegeben.

Empfohlen für:
Die Veranstaltung ist eine Pflichtveranstaltung im Masterstudiengang Arbeit, Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft (BB4). Im Masterstudiengang Kognitive und Klinische Psychologie kann die Veranstaltung im Rahmen des Wahlmoduls(AG4) belegt werden.

Erworben werden kann:
Nachweis einer Prüfungsleistung (benotet) oder Nachweis einer Studienleistung (unbenotet)

ECTS: 4

Voraussetzung: Gute Englischkenntnisse

Anmeldung: Über das Studierendenportal

Sprechstunde: Prof. Dr. Herbert  Bless nach Anmeldung, siehe Homepage, A 433
                        Prof. Dr. Dagmar Stahlberg: Di, 14:00-15:00 Uhr, A 435

Materialien: Über das Studierendenportal
Methods in Empirical Social Sciences: Meta-Analysis (Seminar, English)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
7.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
Description:
Prerequisites:
B.Sc.-level statistics / research methods course (at least two years of training)
Course description:
In a nutshell, meta-analysis can be described as a set of statistical methods for aggregating, summarizing, and drawing inferences from collections of thematically related studies. The key idea is to quantify the size, direction, and/or strength of an effect, and to cancel out sampling errors associated with individual studies. Meta-analytic techniques have become the standard methods for aggregating the results from thematically related studies in the social and behavioral sciences. They can be used to describe a research field, to test and/or compare theories on a high level of abstraction, and to derive conclusions about the effectiveness of interventions.
The overall goal of this course is to provide a hands-on introduction into the different approaches belonging to the umbrella term ´meta-analysis´, to sketch their conceptual foundations, and to point participants to special issues and problems when evaluating and/or conducting meta-analytic studies. Moreover, each and every of the following topics addressed will be accompanied by exercises:
• What kind of scientific and applied research problems can be addressed meta-analytically?
• Big picture: The meta-analytic research cycle
• Meta-analytic models: Hedges/Olkin, Hunter/Schmidt (Psychometric), and Bayesian Approaches
• Problem statement: Framing meta-analytic research questions
• Systematically retrieving relevant primary studies: Literature research and selection
• Extracting information from primary studies: Coding
• Effect sizes: Basic types, estimation, conversion, and approximation strategies
• Synthesizing the evidence: Mean effect size computation, moderator analysis techniques
• Special issues: Dependent effect sizes, publication bias, study quality
• Interpretation and reporting
• Case studies from various fields (tailored towards the academic backgrounds of the participants)
BC2/AC1: Forschungs- und Anwendungstechniken 2: Berufliche Eignungsdiagnostik in der Personalauswahl und Laufbahnberatung (Blockseminar Höft) (Seminar, German)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
4.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
German
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
Description:
Zielsetzung:
Techniken der beruflichen Eignungsdiagnostik können für unterschiedliche Personalmaßnahmen eingesetzt werden. Im Seminar werden zwei Anwendungsszenarien (in der Personalauswahl und für die berufliche Laufbahnberatung) genauer untersucht werden. Mit Mittelpunkt stehen zunächst grundlegende Herangehensweisen und Verfahrenstechniken der beruflichen Eignungsdiagnostik. Anhand eines fiktiven Anwendungsfalls sollen dann eignungsdiagnostische Untersuchungen im Grundprinzip geplant und auch praktisch umgesetzt werden. Die Untersuchungsergebnisse sollen dann anwendungs- und zielpersonengerecht mündlich und schriftlich kommuniziert werden.
BC2: Forschungs- und Anwendungstechniken 2. Creating experiments with OpenSesame (Kieslich) Blockseminar (Seminar, English)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
4.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Registration procedure:
If exchange students require a grade, the course will be graded.

PSYCHOLOGY EXCHANGE STUDENTS will be contacted by the international affairs coordinator for Psychology (int-psych@uni-mannheim.de) via mail to indicate their course preferences.

NON-PSYCHOLOGY EXCHANGE STUDENTS may solely attend if (a) places are left (b) students posses basic knowledge in Psychology and statistics (c) the docent approves participation. For applications please contact the international affairs coordinator for Psychology (int-psych@uni-mannheim.de).
Literature:
Software:
OpenSesame can be downloaded for free under http://osdoc.cogsci.nl/index.html, where you can also find an extensive documentation.

Literature:
Mathôt, S., Schreij, D., & Theeuwes, J. (2012). OpenSesame: An open-source, graphical experiment builder for the social sciences. Behavior Research Methods, 44(2), 314-324. http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13428-011-0168-7 (Open Access)
Instructor(s):
Description:
Please note that this is a block course.

OpenSesame is a free, open-source, and cross-platform software for creating laboratory experiments. Many standard tasks can be implemented in OpenSesame via drag and drop using its graphical user interface. In addition, complex tasks can be realized through the underlying programming language Python. The goal of the workshop is to provide an introduction to both approaches. In doing so, the workshop involves both structured input from the instructor as well as a number of practical exercises so that participants can directly explore the features of OpenSesame. Besides, the workshop will introduce plug-ins that extend OpenSesame for specific purposes,  e.g., the psynteract plug-ins that implement real-time interactions between participants (as required in many economic games), and the mousetrap plug-ins that implement mouse-tracking during decision tasks (a method that is becoming increasingly popular in the cognitive sciences to measure preference development). Additional topics can be covered depending on the preferences of the workshop participants. No prior knowledge of the software or Python is required.
AC2/BC2: Research- and Implementation- Techniques 2 (Seminar, English)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
4.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Literature:
Literature will be given during the course
Examination achievement:
graded homework
Instructor(s):
Description:

The software R is a computer programming language designed for statistical analysis and graphics. The first part of the course deals with a basic introduction to R, i.e. data handling, basic statistical analyses, the creation of graphics, and linear modeling including test for specially designed hypotheses. In the second part we use R as a programming language for cognitive modeling. We will simulate data based on mathematical models of cognitive functions and analyze these data with maximum likelihood parameter estimation techniques. At the end, I will introduce some advanced techniques, for example the creation of statistical reports with R.

The software package R is free and available on all major platforms (www.r-project.org). I also recommend the free and platform independent Software RStudio as a comfortable IDE for R (www.rstudio.com). A basic introduction to R can be found under: http://cran.r-project.org/doc/manuals/r-release/R-intro.pdf.

AC2/BC2: Research- and Application techniques 2 (Seminar, German)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
4.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
German
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
Description:
Bei diesem Seminar handelt es sich um ein optionales Angebot, das begleitend zur Vorlesung “Multivariate Auswertungsverfahren” angeboten wird. Es richtet sich daher insbesondere an Studierende aus dem ersten Fachsemester des Masters.
Der Fokus des Seminars liegt auf der praktischen Anwendung der theoretischen Inhalte der Vorlesung (insbesondere Regression und Allgemeines Lineares Modell, Mehrebenenanalyse, sowie exploratorische und konfirmatorische Faktorenanalyse). Dazu werden Beispieldatensätze mit gängiger statistischer Software (z. B. SPSS) ausgewertet und die Ergebnisse interpretiert. Dies erfolgt durch Demonstrationen seitens der Dozentin/des Dozenten und in angeleiteter Einzel- und Gruppenarbeit. Vorkenntnisse in SPSS sind nicht nötig.
BF1/BG1: Selected Topics in Organizational- and Workpsychology I/II (Seminar, German)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
4.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
German
Hours per week:
2
Literature:
Die Literatur wird in der konstituierenden Sitzung bekannt gegeben.
Instructor(s):
Description:
Unternehmen kümmern sich zunehmend mehr um die Gesundheit ihrer Mitarbeiter/innen. Dies schlägt sich in entsprechenden Führungskonzepten sowie konkreten gesundheitsfördernden Maßnahmen nieder. Das Seminar beschäftigt sich somit mit der Frage, wie Unternehmen handeln können, um die Gesundheit der Mitarbeiter/innen langfristig zu erhalten. Dabei soll auch das individuelle gesundheitsbezogene Handeln der Mitarbeiter/innen thematisiert werden.
 
Das Seminar besteht aus zwei Teilen. Im ersten Teil erarbeiten wir gemeinsam anhand aktueller Forschungsliteratur den Forschungsstand zum Thema. In dieser Zeit haben die Studierenden Gelegenheit, sich für ein Thema zu entscheiden, das sie im Rahmen ihrer Hausarbeit sowie im zweiten Teil des Seminars in Projektgruppen vertieft bearbeiten.
 
Im Rahmen von Projektgruppen werden die Studierenden im zweiten Teil des Seminars die gelernten und selbst erarbeiteten Inhalte in Form von Broschüren, Postern etc. praxisnah umsetzen.
Am Ende des Seminars erfolgt eine Präsentation der Projektgruppenergebnisse.
 
Neben einer inhaltlichen Diskussion legt das Seminar auch besonderes Gewicht auf die arbeits- und organisationspsychologischen Methoden, mit denen Gesundheit bei der Arbeit untersucht wird.
BF1/BG1: Spezielle Themen der Arbeits- und Organisationspsychologie I/II - Selbstregulation im Arbeitskontext (Seminar, German)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
4.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
German
Hours per week:
2
Literature:
Die Literatur wird in der konstituierenden Sitzung bekannt gegeben.
Instructor(s):
Description:

Dieses Seminar beschäftigt sich mit dem Thema Selbstregulation im Arbeitskontext. In zunehmend flexibleren Arbeitsumgebungen gewinnt Selbstregulation immer mehr an Bedeutung. In diesem Seminar beschäftigen wir uns daher mit der Frage, welche Rolle Selbstregulation im Arbeitsalltag spielt und was Organisationen tun können, um die Selbstregulation ihrer Mitarbeiter/innen zu unterstützen. Dabei werden wir uns unter anderem mit den Themen Zeitmanagement, Emotionsregulation und der Rolle von Führungskräften für die Selbstregulation beschäftigen.

Das Seminar besteht aus zwei Teilen. Im ersten Teil erarbeiten wir gemeinsam anhand aktueller Forschungsliteratur den Forschungsstand zum Thema. In dieser Zeit haben die Studierenden Gelegenheit, sich für ein Thema zu entscheiden, das sie im Rahmen ihrer Hausarbeit sowie im zweiten Teil des Seminars in Projektgruppen vertieft bearbeiten.

Im Rahmen von Projektgruppen werden die Studierenden im zweiten Teil des Seminars die gelernten und selbst erarbeiteten Inhalte in Form von Broschüren, Postern etc. praxisnah umsetzen. Am Ende des Seminars erfolgt eine Präsentation der Projektgruppenergebnisse.

Neben einer inhaltlichen Diskussion legt das Seminar auch besonderes Gewicht auf die arbeits- und organisationspsychologischen Methoden, mit denen Selbstregulation im Arbeitskontext untersucht wird.

 

BH1/BI1/BC2: Spezielle Themen der Pädagogischen PsychologieI/II, Instruktionspsychologische Ansätze des Lernens unter Berücksichtigung von Prozessdaten (Seminar, German)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
4.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
German
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
BH1/BI1/BC2: Von psychologischer Theorie zur Technologie - Weiterentwicklung studentischer Lehrevaluation an der Fakultät für Sozialwissenschaften (Seminar mit Service-Learning Aspekten) (Seminar, German)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
4.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
German
Hours per week:
2
Learning target:
Zentrale Lerninhalte sind:
  • Erkenntnis der Herausforderung an studentische Lehrevaluationen
  • Entwicklung handlungsorientierter psychologischer Technologien zur Lösung praktischer Probleme
  • Stakeholdergerechte Kommunikation (Vermitteln eigener Ideen an Praktiker)
  • Implementierung eines Feldversuchs
Recommended requirement:
Literature:
Grundlagenliteratur

Rindermann, H. (2003). Lehrevaluation an Hochschulen: Schlussfolgerungen aus Forschung und Anwendung für Hochschulunterricht und seine Evaluation. Zeitschrift für Evaluation, 2, 233–256.
Stroebe, W. (2016). Why good teaching evaluations may reward bad teaching: On grade inflation and other unintended consequences of student evaluations. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 11, 800-816.
Uttl, B., White, C. A., & Gonzalez, D. W. (2017). Meta-analysis of faculty's teaching effectiveness: Student evaluation of teaching ratings and student learning are not related. Studies in Educational Evaluation, 54, 22-42.
Examination achievement:
Konzeptplan eines Modellversuchs, inklusive:
  • Theoretischer Hintergrund
  • Darstellung der Technologie
  • Erläuterung zur Implementierung in der Fakultät für Sozialwissenschaften (in stakeholdergerechter Sprache)
Instructor(s):
Description:
Die Fakultät für Sozialwissenschaften plant aktuell eine Weiterentwicklung der studentischen Lehrevaluation. Ein entsprechendes Instrument befindet sich bereits in der Entwicklung. Eine Herausforderung bei der Entwicklung dieses Instruments, ist die Erkentnis zahlreicher aktueller Forschungsarbeiten zur Validität studentischer Lehrevaluationen. Besagte Arbeiten zeigen, dass studentische Lehrevaluationen meist in erster Linie Zufriedenheitsurteile darstellen, welche gar nicht oder nur schlecht mit härteren Indikatoren des Lernerfolges in Zusammenhang stehen.

Im Rahmen dieses Seminars sollen innovative Auswege aus dieser Problemstellung erarbeitet werden, welche in Modellversuchen auf den Prüfstand gestellt werden können. Ziel ist es, nachhaltige Verbesserungsvorschläge für die Lehrevaluationspraxis an der Fakultät für Sozialwissenschaften zu formulieren, welche auch dazu beitragen sollen die Evaluationsmüdigkeit bei Studierenden und Dozierenden zu vermindern.

WICHTIG: Am Donnerstag dem 13.09. findet ein Blocktermin außer der Reihe (10:15 - 13:30 Uhr) statt, in dessen Verlauf die Referentin für Qualitätsmanagement der Fakultät für Sozialwissenschaften den aktuellen Projektstand vorstellt und für Fragen zur Verfügung steht. Die Teilnahme an diesem Termin ist essentiell für die Mitarbeit im Seminar
BM2/BN2: Sozialpsychologische Anwendungen I/II: Self & Society (Seminar, German)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
4.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
German
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
Description:
BM1/BN1: Sozialpsychologische Anwendungen I/II: Interventionen der Positiven Psychologie

durchgeführt von: Thomas Dyllick

Raum: B318

Termin: Mi., 15:30-17:00 Uhr (wtl.)

Veranstaltungszeitraum: 5.09.-5.12.2018

Inhalt: Die Positive Psychologie befasst sich mit den Bedingungen und Prozessen, die zum Wohl und zum optimalen Funktionieren von Menschen, Gruppen und Institutionen beitragen. Damit grenzt sie sich von der „klassischen“ Ausrichtung der Psychologie auf Störungen und negative Lebensaspekte (z.B. irrationales Verhalten, psychische Störungen) ab. Im Rahmen des Seminars wird die Forschung der Positiven Psychologie beleuchtet, wobei Forschung zu Interventionen und zur praktischen Anwendbarkeit im Vordergrund stehen werden.

Studienleistungen (unbenotet): Referat und Hausaufgaben

Prüfungsleistungen (benotet) : Hausarbeit

Literatur: wird in der Veranstaltung bekannt gegeben

Empfohlen für: Studierende im M.Sc. Psychologie

Erworben werden kann: 4 ECTS-Punkte

Voraussetzung: B.Sc. in Psychologie oder äquivalenter Abschluss

Anmeldung: erfolgt nur über das Studierendenportal

Sprechstunde: nach Vereinbarung

Materialien: -
BM1/BN1: Selected Topics in Social Psychology I/II (Seminar, German)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
4.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
German
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
Description:
Art des Seminars: BM1/BN1: Ausgewählte Probleme der Sozialpsychologie I/II:

Titel: Psychologie der Führung/ Psychology of Leadership

durchgeführt von: Dr. Christiane Schöl

Raum: B 318

Termin: Dienstag, 13:45-15:15 Uhr

Veranstaltungszeitraum: 04.09.-04.12.2018

Inhalt:
Führung ist ein Thema, das in ganz unterschiedlichen Bereichen des sozialen Lebens eine Rolle spielt, in der Politik und Wirtschaft, im Schulkontext, im therapeutischen Setting, aber auch in der Freizeit. Ziel der Veranstaltung ist es, einen Einblick in grundlegende sozialpsychologische Theorien und Forschungsbefunde zum Thema Führung zu geben. Das Seminar wird sich zum einen mit Aspekten der zu führenden Gruppe, der Führungsperson und der Führungssituation, zum anderen mit möglichen Outcomevariablen befassen. Befunde aus der Sozialpsychologie werden diskutiert und verschiedene Anwendungsbereiche näher beleuchtet.

Empfohlen für: BM1/BN1 bzw. BM2/BN2
Masterstudierende Psychologie 1. und 3. Semester

Erworben werden können: 4 ECTS

Erforderliche Studienleistung: Hausaufgaben, Referat (Präsentation Projektarbeit)

Erforderliche Prüfungsleistung: Hausarbeit (schriftliche Ausarbeitung der Projektarbeit)

Voraussetzung: B.Sc. in Psychologie oder äquivalenter Abschluss

Anmeldung: Portal2

Sprechstunde: Nach Vereinbarung

Materialien: Werden in der Veranstaltung bekannt gegeben.

Literatur: Wird in der Veranstaltung bekannt gegeben.
BM1/BN1: Selected Topics in Social Psychology I/II (Seminar, German)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
4.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
German
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
Description:
Inhalt:
Wozu brauchen wir Geld? Welche Funktion hat Geld? Was macht Geld mit uns? Wie denken wir über Geld nach? Das Konzept Geld ist aus unserem Leben nicht wegzudenken, in sehr vielen Bereichen unseres Alltags ist es präsent – und dies ziemlich unabhängig davon, ob wir wenig Geld oder viel Geld zur Verfügung haben. Wenn wir über Geld nachdenken, wird schnell ersichtlich, dass die ökonomische und die psychologische Perspektive auf Geld häufig eng verknüpft sind. Dabei kann man die Beziehung zwischen Geld und Psychologie aus zwei Richtungen betrachten: Einerseits beeinflussen psychologische Mechanismen, wie wir Geld wahrnehmen und wie wir Finanzentscheidungen treffen und andererseits beeinflusst Geld unser Denken, Erleben und Verhalten. Im Rahmen des Seminars sollen selektiv ausgewählte Fragestellungen näher betrachtet werden: „Macht Geld glücklich?“ „Welche Folgen sind zu erwarten, wenn Personen an Geld denken?“ „Welche psychologischen Konsequenzen sind beobachtbar, wenn Personen über ein sehr geringes Einkommen/Vermögen verfügen“, „Welche psychologischen Konsequenzen gehen mit einer sehr ungleichen Verteilung von Vermögen/Einkommen einher“, „Sind finanzielle Anreize geeignet, eine Leistungsverbesserung zu bewirken?“, etc.

Zeit: Montag 10.15-11.45, wöchentlich

erster Termin: 3.9.2018

Literatur: Wird in der Veranstaltung bekannt gegeben.

Empfohlen für:
Studierende der Psychologie des Masterstudiengangs „Arbeit, Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft“. Die Veranstaltung kann als BM1/BN1 oder BM2/BN2 im Rahmen der Module BM/BN „Denken und Verhalten im sozialen Kontext“ besucht werden. Für eine begrenzte Teilnehmerzahl kann die Veranstaltung auch als im Rahmen der Module BK (BK1/BK2) und BL (BL1/BL2) angerechnet werden.

Raum: Seminarraum A 103 (B6, 23-25 Bauteil A)

Erworben werden kann:
Nachweis einer benoteten Prüfungsleistung. Erforderlich für den Leistungsnach sind (a) aktive Seminarteilnahme, (b) eigene Präsentation, (c) Hausarbeit. Grundlage für die Benotung ist die schriftliche Hausarbeit.

ECTs: 4

Voraussetzung: Zulassung zum Masterstudiengangs „Arbeit, Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft“

Anmeldung: Über das Studierendenportal

Sprechstunde nach Anmeldung, siehe Homepage, A 433

Materialien Über das Studierendenportal
BM1/BN1: Selected Topics in Social Psychology I/II (Seminar, English)
Lecture type:
Seminar
ECTS:
4.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
English
Hours per week:
2
Instructor(s):
Description:
BM1/BN1: Selected research topics in social psychology  I/II: „Theories and Methods in Social Psychology“

Inhalt:
This seminar has a particular focus on research activities in social psychology. Unlike seminars that concentrate on one core thematic topic, this seminar will address a selected variety of different research topics in current social psychology. In each seminar session we will have a presentation either by participating students or by members of the social psychology group. Each presentation will address a current research topic in social psychology. The seminar provides the opportunity to actively discuss methodological, theoretical, and applied implications of the presented research. A particular focus will rest on the discussion of general methodological aspects. Participants need to have passed at least one other social psychology seminar in the master program or, alternatively, they have to be enrolled in one other social psychology seminar during the same semester (for international visiting students these preconditions may differ, please contact the program manager psychology).

Time: Monday, 13.45 hours

First session: 3.9.2018

Literature:
Will be announced in the seminar

Recommended for:
Students of the graduate school of the University of Mannheim (CDSS). In addition, advanced students of the M.Sc. Psychology: Work, Economy and Society (for specifications see above) program – as BM1/BN1 or BM2/BN2 in the module „Denken und Verhalten im sozialen Kontext“.

Raum: 309 (B6, Bauteil E-F)

Examination:
Graded examination. Necessary conditions are: (a) active participation in the seminar discussions, (b) own presentation, and (c) homework. Grades are based on the homework (essay).

ECTS: 4

Requirements:
Enrollment in the CDSS or, alternatively, in the M.Sc. Psychology: Work, Economy and Society (in the latter case successful enrollment in one other seminar of the social psychology module is necessary).

Registration: Via Studierendenportal (Portal2)

Office hours: see Homepage, A 433

Materialis: via Studierendenportal (ILIAS)
Einführung in die Medienpsychologie / media psychology (Lecture, German)
Lecture type:
Lecture
ECTS:
4.0
Course suitable for:
Language of instruction:
German
Hours per week:
2
Registration procedure:
REGISTRATION: All incoming exchange students at the School of Humanities need to register for their courses via the Registration Form which will be emailed to them before the start of the semester. For further information please contact: incoming@phil.uni-mannheim.de ANMELDUNG: Alle Austauschstudierenden der Philosophischen Fakultät müssen sich über ein Anmeldeformular für ihre Kurse anmelden, das ihnen vor Beginn des Semesters per Email zugeschickt wird. Für weitere Informationen wenden Sie sich bitte an: incoming@phil.uni-mannheim.de
Instructor(s):
Description:
Die Art und Weise, wie wir miteinander kommunizieren, unsere Freizeit verbringen und unserer Arbeit nachgehen, hat sich in den letzten Jahren und Jahrzehnten stark verändert – nicht nur, aber auch wegen der fortschreitenden technologischen Entwicklung und zunehmenden Verbreitung von Medien. Die Fragen, wie und warum Menschen Medien nutzen, wie sie Medieninhalte verarbeiten und welche Wirkungen und Folgen die Mediennutzung hat, sind von hoher individueller, ökonomischer und gesellschaftlicher Bedeutung. Die Vorlesung zur Einführung in die Medienpsychologie wird in diesem HWS gemeinsam mit Frau Prof. Mata angeboten und einen medien- und gesundheitspsychologischen Schwerpunkt haben. Dabei werden wir uns vor allem mit Wirkungen und Nebenwirkungen im Bereich Gesundheit und Well-Being auseinandersetzen: Welche Auswirkungen hat die Digitalisierung auf Gesundheit und Gesundheitsverhalten – neuer Wein in alten Schläuchen oder eine echte Revolution? Wie kann ich mich im mHealth-Dschungel orientieren? Wie wirksam ist mHealth? Wie beeinflussen digitale Freundschaften und soziale Medien Gesundheitsverhalten und Wohlbefinden? Welche Nebenwirkungen haben digitale Medien? Diese und andere Fragen werden wir anhand von aktueller Literatur und Beispielen vor einem kommunikationswissenschaftlichen und psychologischen Hintergrund bearbeiten.