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Sozial­wissenschaften - Master (alle)

Political Science

Courses in Political Science are usually only open for incoming exchange students majoring in Political Science and for exchange students at the School of Social Sciences (Sociology, Psychology). Nominated exchange students will be contacted by their departmental exchange coordinator via e-mail at the end of November/early December (fall semester) or by the end of May/early June (Spring semester) regarding their course choice.

Exchange students from other schools and departments may only attend classes if (a) places are left for other students (b) they have basic knowledge in political science and statistics (c) the departmental exchange coordinator explicitly approves their participation. In case of further questions, please contact: int-pol@uni-mannheim.de.

Advanced Quantitative Methods (Vorlesung, englisch)
Vorlesungs­typ:
Vorlesung
ECTS:
7.0
Kurs geeignet für:
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Empfohlene Voraussetzungen:
Literatur:
Eliason, Scott R. 1993. Maximum Likelihood Estimation: Logic and Practice. Newbury Park: Sage.
Long, J. Scott. 1997. Regression Models for Categorical and Limited Dependent Variables. Newbury Park: Sage.
King, Gary. 2008. Unifying political methodology: the likelihood theory of statistical inference. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.
Lektor(en):
Thomas Gschwend
Beschreibung:
The goal of this course is to provide an introduction into maximum-likelihood estimation.
Comparative Government: Political Institutions (Vorlesung, englisch)
Vorlesungs­typ:
Vorlesung
ECTS:
7
Kurs geeignet für:
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Lektor(en):
Marc Debus
Beschreibung:
This lecture gives an overview of selected theoretical concepts and the main research findings in the field of Comparative Government, specifically focusing on the role of political institutions. The course introduces a number of core themes in the comparative study of political institutions, such as regime types, constitutional design and electoral systems. The lecture covers the impact of different institutional designs on patterns of political competition, government formation and executive governance. We also discuss the effects of political institutions on several aspects of legislative behaviour and policy-making.
Comparative Political Behavior (Vorlesung, englisch)
Vorlesungs­typ:
Vorlesung
ECTS:
6.0
Kurs geeignet für:
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Lektor(en):
Harald Schoen
Beschreibung:
Content: The main goal of this lecture is to present an advanced introduction to theoretical approaches, key concepts, and substantive issues in comparative political behavior. Building on a multi-level perspective, it will provide an overview of key concepts and theories in the analysis of micro-level processes of political behavior that are embedded in and feed into macro-level processes. Capitalizing on this analytical perspective, the lecture will also address major changes in the relations­hip between societal and political processes and institutions.
International Political Economy (Vorlesung, englisch)
Vorlesungs­typ:
Vorlesung
ECTS:
7
Kurs geeignet für:
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Lektor(en):
International Politics (Vorlesung, englisch)
Vorlesungs­typ:
Vorlesung
ECTS:
7
Kurs geeignet für:
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Lektor(en):
Beschreibung:
Short description: The security of individuals and states depends profoundly on international politics. Beyond the realm of security, structures and actors of “global governance” have been proliferating for many years. They influence crucial public policies in diverse ways. This lecture surveys academic debates on key security and governance topics including: the sources of war, peace, and terrorism; the emergence and operation of international organizations, transnational civil society, and regional integration; and the making of key international policy outcomes including respect for human rights and environmental protection.
Selected Topics in Comparative Politics (Seminar, englisch)
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
7.0
Kurs geeignet für:
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Lektor(en):
Selected Topics in Comparative Politics: Democratic deliberation in times of populism and political polarization (Seminar, englisch)
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
7.0
Kurs geeignet für:
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Literatur:
  • Floridia, A. (2017). From Participation to Deliberation. A Critical Genealogy of Deliberative Democracy. Colchester: ECPR Press.
  • Gastil, J. (2008). Political Communication and Deliberation. Thousand Oaks: Sage.
  • Mutz, D.C. (2008). Is deliberative democracy a falsifiable theory? Annual Review of Political Science 11: 521-538.
  • Schmitt-Beck, R. and Lup, O. (2013): Seeking the Soul of Democracy: A Review of Recent Research into Citizens’ Political Talk Culture. Swiss Political Science Review 19: 513-538
  • Steiner, J. (2012). The Foundations of Deliberative Democracy. Empirical Research and Normative Implications. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Lektor(en):
Rüdiger Schmitt-Beck
Beschreibung:
The idea of deliberative democracy is the most influential and controversial normative conception of modern democratic theory. According to this model, deliberative communication is at the heart of a truly democratic political process. It involves carefully examining political problems and arriving at well-reasoned solutions after dialogical, inclusive and respectful consideration of diverse points of view. In various ways, deliberative communication is believed to enhance the quality of democracy. Ordinary people’s everyday communication about political matters is often seen as the foundation of a truly deliberative democracy. But can ordinary citizens’ meet the high standards of deliberative communication? To what extent does their communication correspond to the deliberative ideal, and which consequences follow from this? Especially in times of increasing party-political and ideological polarization, spurred by the rise of right-wing populism, these are important questions. The seminar offers a unique opportunity to get first-hand insights on whether citizens can and do deliberate. Following a discussion of the concept of democratic deliberation and its measurement participants will analyze freshly collected data from an extensive survey on citizens’ (offline and online) everyday communication conducted in an MZES project. It will be explored how citizens discuss politics, which factors promote a more or less deliberative style of everyday communication, and which consequences this has for citizens’ political attitudes and behaviors.
Selected Topics in International Politics: European Union Politics (Seminar, englisch)
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
7
Kurs geeignet für:
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Literatur:
Literature

Readings will be available through the ILIAS system or, alternatively, in the university library in A5 under Semesteraparat.

Background reading:
Hix, S. and Hoyland, Bjorn (2011) The Political System of the European Union. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.


 
Books offering alternative introductory material:
Cini, M. and Borragán, N. P. (Eds.) (2013) European Union Politics. 4th ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Lelieveldt, H. and Princen, S. (2015) The Politics of the European Union. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Lektor(en):
Beschreibung:
Course description This graduate-level seminar will familiarize students with the state of the art analytical research on European Union politics. At a theoretical level, we will review bargaining and procedural models of decision-making (and the importance of agenda setting, veto power and gate-keeping), legislative organization, bicameralism, executive-legislative relations, party politics, etc. At an empirical level, we will assess issues such as the low electoral participation in the European Parliament elections, the rise of Euroscepticism, the legitimacy of law-making via informal institutions, the drivers and impact of differentiated integration and variable compliance with EU decisions among member states. Students will engage in either replicating and extending existing research, or conducting innovative case studies tracking the development and explaining the outcome of legislative proposals. We will conclude by reflecting on the future of Europe in the shadow of the Eurozone, refugee and Brexit crises.

Aims and objectives
The course aims: To introduce students to the state of the art analytical research on the European Union
To encourage critical assessment of alternative theoretical arguments, research designs and empirical findings in class discussions as well as through research replication
To motivate students to develop their own research ideas and guide them in examining these ideas in their analytical papers 
Language of instruction
English
 
Registration The course welcomes M.A. students in political science and CDSS students. Students who wish to take this course need to register at the student portal. Auditing is possible upon request approval, provided that the students regularly attend and fully participate in the seminar sessions.
Tutorial Advanced Quantitative Methods (Seminar, englisch)
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
2.0
Kurs geeignet für:
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Lektor(en):
Thomas Gschwend
Beschreibung:
This tutorial accompanies the course “Multivariate Analyses” in the M.A. program in Political Science. The lab sessions will focus on the practical issues associated with quantitative methods, including obtaining and preparing data sets, how to use statistical software, which tests to use for different kinds of problems, how to graph data effectively for presentation and analysis, and how to interpret results. The seminar will also serve as a software tutorial. No prior knowledge of statistical programming is expected.

Sociology

Courses in Sociology are usually only open for incoming exchange students majoring in Sociology and for exchange students at the School of Social Sciences (Political Science, Psychology). Nominated exchange students will be contacted by their departmental exchange coordinator via e-mail at the end of November/early December (fall semester) or by the end of May/early June (Spring semester) regarding their course choice.

Exchange students from other schools and departments may only attend classes if (a) places are left for other students (b) they have basic knowledge in sociology and statistics (c) the departmental exchange coordinator explicitly approves their participation. In case of further questions, please contact: int-soc@uni-mannheim.de.

BM2/BN2: Denken und Verhalten im sozialen Kontext: „Selected research topics in social psychology“ / BM2/BN2: Applied Social Psychology I/II: Selected research topics in social psychology (Seminar, englisch)
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
4.0
Kurs geeignet für:
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Lektor(en):
Herbert Bless
Beschreibung:

This seminar has a particular focus on research activities in social psychology. Unlike seminars that concentrate on one core thematic topic, this seminar will address a selected variety of different research topics in current social psychology.  In each seminar session we will have a presentation either by participating students or by members of the social psychology group. Each presentation will address a current research topic in social psychology. The seminar provides the opportunity to actively discuss methodological, theoretical, and applied implications of the presented research. Participants need to have passed at least one other social psychology seminar in the master program or, alternatively, they have to be enrolled in one other social psychology seminar during the same semester (for international visiting students these preconditions may differ, please contact the program manager psychology).
BM2/BN2: Sozialpsychologische Anwendungen: „Fake News“ aus psychologischer Perspektive / BM2/BN2: Applied Social Psychology: „Fake News“ from a Psychological Perspective (Seminar, deutsch)
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
Kurs geeignet für:
Kurssprache:
deutsch
SWS:
2
Literatur:
Wird in der Veranstaltung bekannt gegeben.
Lektor(en):
Herbert Bless
Beschreibung:
„Fake News“, „alternative Fakten“ oder das „postfaktische Zeitalter“, diese Schlagworte werden spätestens nach der Präsidentschaft Donald Trumps in den Medien immer wieder diskutiert, aber Propaganda und Fehl­informationen haben historisch betrachtet auch zu anderen Zeiten schon eine wichtige Rolle gespielt. Ziel dieses Seminars ist es, die Phänomene aus (sozial-)psychologischer Sicht zu betrachten: Welche kognitiven und motivationalen Faktoren machen Menschen empfänglich für bestimmte Arten von Fehl­informationen? Wovon hängt es ab, wie weit sich Fehl­informationen verbreiten und wie lange sie sich halten? Wie geht man am besten vor, um Fehl­informationen entgegenzuwirken? Diese und ähnliche Fragestellungen werden im Laufe dieses Seminars behandelt werden.

Empfohlen für: BM1/BN bzw. BM2/BN2

Erworben werden kann: 4 ECTS

Erforderliche Studien­leistung: Referat, Hausaufgaben

Erforderliche Prüfungs­leistung: Hausarbeit

Voraussetzung: B.Sc. in Psychologie oder äquivalenter Abschluss

Anmeldung: über das Studierenden­portal

Sprechstunde: siehe Homepage

Wird in der Veranstaltung bekannt gegeben bzw. eigenständig recherchiert.
VL Longitudinal Data Analysis (Vorlesung, englisch)
Vorlesungs­typ:
Vorlesung
ECTS:
6
Kurs geeignet für:
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Literatur:
Literature
Andress, H.J., Golsch, K. and Schmidt, Alexander W. 2013. Applied Panel Data Analysis for Economic and Social Surveys.
Lektor(en):
Katja Hanna Helene Möhring
Beschreibung:
Course description
The course provides a broad overview over methods of longitudinal data analysis, with a focus on the analysis of panel data. Compared to cross-sectional data, panel data can allow to improve causal inference. The first objective of this course is to understand why and under which conditions this is the case. In the next step, we will discuss a variety of different modeling approaches to panel data (fixed effects, random effects, first difference) and learn how to decide between these models. The lecture also provides an overview over event history models. It is highly recommended to participate in the parallel exercises to this lecture, in which the presented models are applied to real data sets.

Information for Mannheim Master in Data Science students: Please be aware that there are only 3 places reserved in this lecture for students of the Mannheim Master in Data Science. You can just register via the portal. Places will be allocated randomly by the end of January. Please check the portal on 5 February to see if you are still registered.
S Elective Seminar: „Structuralist Theory“ (Seminar, englisch)
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
6
Kurs geeignet für:
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Lektor(en):
Henning Hillmann
Beschreibung:
The aim of this course is to introduce students to structuralist theorizing in the social sciences. One way to characterize structuralist thinking is to posit the primacy of relations over attributes: considering kinship, for example, it is not meaningful to speak of being a father without any reference to sons and daughters. In other words, any social role is inherently relational because it always entails a role complement (father-son, or father-daughter). As we will see throughout the course, much of social life and human behavior can be understood with reference to such relational pairs. Pairs often come in the form of binary oppositions: nature-nurture; female-male; young-elder; us-them; and so forth. Drawing on the work of Claude Lévi-Strauss in particular, the course aims (a) to systematically understand the building blocks of structuralist thinking, and (b) to understand its implications for social organization and cohesion writ large, that is, what holds societies together in the long run. Substantive empirical evidence will come from systems of social exchange, governed by norms of reciprocity; from the contrast between restricted and generalized exchange; the formation and ambiguities of role structures; and from the structural analysis of culture, in particular in the form of myths that provide a foundation for social organization in indigenous societies. Students planning to take this class should be prepared to consider empirical examples that come from rather exotic societies, remote in place and time from our contemporary society.
S Elective Seminar: Migration, Integration and Ethnic Diversity (Seminar, englisch)
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
6
Kurs geeignet für:
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Lektor(en):
Frank Kalter
S Elective Seminar (Seminar, englisch)
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
6
Kurs geeignet für:
Kurssprache:
englisch
Lektor(en):
S Elective Seminar: Public Preferences and Social Policy: The Impacts of Immigration in Europe. (Seminar, englisch)
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
6
Kurs geeignet für:
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Literatur:
Literature to frame the course:

Kulin, Joakim, Maureen A. Eger, and Mikael Hjerm. 2016. “Immigration or Welfare? The Progressive’s Dilemma Revisited.” Socius 2:1–15.
Bay, Ann-Helén and Axel West Pedersen. 2006. “The Limits of Social Solidarity: Basic Income, Immigration and the Legitimacy of the Universal Welfare State.” Acta Sociologica 49(4):419–36.
Lektor(en):
Katja Hanna Helene Möhring
Beschreibung:
Description:
The number of foreign-born persons in Western Europe increased dramatically over the past three decades. Also in Eastern European countries, immigrants, particularly refugees, are increasing in numbers for the first time in recent history. This produces many social outcomes that link to trust, voting, inequality and the role of the state. For example, having more foreigners in a country or region may reduce trust and increase intergroup conflicts. In Germany, for the first time since WWII, an anti-immigrant, populist party gained substantial political power. Also, many immigrants, in particular refugees or family reunification immigrants, face substantial labor market disadvantage and poverty. Many states were not equipped to deal with immigration and refugee asylum seeking on the scale that developed in recent history. All of these features of European societies affect public preferences and public opinion. At the same time, public preferences and opinion shapes how governments react to immigration.
This course considers the many linkages between public preferences and social policies as they relate to immigrants, immigration and refugee seeking. It considers how the public reacts to immigration in voting, group dynamics and social movements (protests, violence). It considers how immigrants react to their statuses in European countries. It looks at how public reactions link to state policies and the distribution of power among political parties, and how states interact with each other in the European Union. All of this will take place with a focus on survey data. We will read relevant literature and analyze relevant data as part of the course work. This data analysis will take place using Stata statistical software. Knowledge of Stata is not necessary, but will be helpful for students in this course.
S Elective Seminar: Python programming for social sciences (Seminar, englisch)
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
6
Kurs geeignet für:
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Lektor(en):
Beschreibung:
Description: This course offers an introduction to the Python programming language with a focus on solving social science problems. The course is structured around a series of practical exercises for working with basic Python functionalities, reading structured and “unstructured” datasets into Python, using statistical and network analytic methods and designing visualizations. The course demonstrates the utility of working with Python in two ways. We are going to replicate quantitative analyses from publications in social science journals and we will take advantage of Python’s compatibility with application programming interfaces (APIs) in order to explore several new data sources (e.g., Twitter, Wikipedia, Meetup, Github, Discogs). The replication exercises require some mandatory reading and supplementary materials will be suggested. The main focus of the course will concentrate on practicing Python programming and discussing when and how it might benefit social science research. We will also take time to discuss the applicability of Python to ongoing research interests among the participants. No prior programming experience is required.
S Elective Seminar: Causal Analysis (Seminar, englisch)
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
6
Kurs geeignet für:
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Lektor(en):
Frank Kalter
Beschreibung:
Does education increase income? Does minimum wage decrease unemployment? Does slave trade affect current-day levels of trust? A major goal of empirical research is to test causal relations­hips. However, many of the methods used in empirical social science research were not originally designed for causal inference, a gap that is rapidly filled by two “revolutions”: Following the identification revolution, researchers take the key assumptions for identifying causal quantities much more seriously than before. And in the wake of the potential outcomes revolution traditional statistical methods are reframed within a formal framework of causal inference (cf. Imai 2011). This seminar introduces students to the basic concepts underlying causal analysis. We discuss several common strategies to infer causality and apply them relying on classic examples from the literature. In addition, we apply those strategies to our own questions of interest.
S Seminar in Research Methods: Multilevel Modeling (Seminar, englisch)
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
6
Kurs geeignet für:
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Empfohlene Voraussetzungen:
Literatur:
  • Goldstein, H. (2010). Multilevel Statistical Models (Fourth Edition). London: Arnold.
  • Hox, J. (2010). Multilevel Analysis: Techniques and Applications. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.
  • Rabe-Hesketh, S. & Skrondal, A. (2012). Multilevel and Longitudinal Modeling Using Stata. 3nd Edition. College Station, TX: Stata Press.
  • Raudenbush, S. W. & Bryk, A. S. (2002). Hierarchical Linear Models. Thousand Oaks: Sage.
  • Snijders, T. A. B. & Bosker, R. J. (2012). Multilevel Analysis. An Introduction to Basic and Advanced Multilevel Modelling. London: Sage.
  • StataCorp. (2017). Stata Multilevel Mixed-Effects. Reference Manual. Release 15. College Station, TX: Stata Press.
Lektor(en):
Thomas Gautschi , Michael Braun
Beschreibung:
Multilevel modeling is used when observations on the individual level are nested in units of one or more higher levels (e.g. students in classes in schools). The course will cover the logic of multilevel modeling, its statistical background, and implementation with Stata. Applications will come from international comparative research treating countries as the higher level units. Data from the International Social Survey Program and the PIONEUR project (on intra-European migration) serve as examples. However, students are also encouraged to bring their own data.
S Seminar in Research Methods: Machine Learning in the Social Sciences (Seminar, englisch)
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
6
Kurs geeignet für:
Kurssprache:
englisch
Empfohlene Voraussetzungen:
Literatur:
Foster, I., Ghani, R., Jarmin, R. S., Kreuter, F., & Lane, J. (Eds.). (2017). Big Data and
Social Science: A Practical Guide to Methods and Tools. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press
Taylor & Francis Group.
Hastie, T., Tibshirani, R., Friedman, J. (2009). The Elements of Statistical Learning:
Data Mining, Inference, and Prediction. New York, NY: Springer.
Lektor(en):
Frauke Kreuter , Christoph Kern
Beschreibung:
This course provides an introduction to supervised statistical learning techniques such as decision trees, random forests and boosting and discusses their potential application in the social sciences. These methods focus on predicting an outcome Y based on some data-driven funtion f(X) and therefore facilitate new research perspectives in comparison with traditional regression models, which primarily focus on causation. Predictive methods also provide a valuable extension to the empirical social scientists' toolkit as new data sources become more prominent. The discussed methods will be implemented using the statistical programming language R.
S Seminar in Research Methods: Big Data in the Social Sciences (Seminar, englisch)
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
6
Kurs geeignet für:
Kurssprache:
englisch
Literatur:
We will use the following books and require familiarity with the books in preparation for the course.

Foster, I., Ghani, R., Jarmin R.S., Kreuter F., Lane J. (Eds.) (2016): Big Data and Social Science: A Practical Guide to Methods and Tools. Chapman and Hall/CRC Press.


Salganik, M. (2017): Bit by Bit. Social Research in the Digital Age. Princeton University 
Online version: http://www.bitbybitbook.com/en/preface/

Stephens-Davidowitz, S. (2017). Everybody lies: Big Data, New Data, and What the internet can tell us about who we really are. Dey Street Books.
Lektor(en):
Frauke Kreuter
Beschreibung:
The world has changed for empirical social scientists. The new types of “big data” have generated an entire new research field—that of data science. That world is dominated by computer scientists who have generated new ways of creating and collecting data, developed new analytical and statistical techniques, and provided new ways of visualizing and presenting information. These new sources of data and techniques have the potential to transform the way applied social science is done. Research has certainly changed. Researchers draw on data that are “found” rather than “made” by federal agencies; those publishing in leading academic journals are much less likely today to draw on preprocessed survey data. And the jobs have changed. The new job title of “data scientist” is highlighted in job advertisements on CareerBuilder.com and Burning-glass.com—in the same category as statisticians, economists, and other quantitative social scientists if starting salaries are useful indicators.

The goal of this course is to provide social scientists with an understanding of the key elements of this new science, its value, and the opportunities for doing better work. The goal is also to identify the many ways in which the analytical toolkits possessed by social scientists can be brought to bear to enhance the generalizability of the work done by computer scientists.
S Seminar in Research Methods: Machine-Learning in the Social Sciences, only for GESS students (Seminar, englisch)
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
6
Kurs geeignet für:
Kurssprache:
englisch
Empfohlene Voraussetzungen:
Literatur:
Foster, I., Ghani, R., Jarmin, R. S., Kreuter, F., & Lane, J. (Eds.). (2017). Big Data and
Social Science: A Practical Guide to Methods and Tools. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press
Taylor & Francis Group.
Hastie, T., Tibshirani, R., Friedman, J. (2009). The Elements of Statistical Learning:
Data Mining, Inference, and Prediction. New York, NY: Springer.
Lektor(en):
Christoph Kern , Frauke Kreuter
Beschreibung:
This course provides an introduction to supervised statistical learning techniques such as decision trees, random forests and boosting and discusses their potential application in the social sciences. These methods focus on predicting an outcome Y based on some data-driven funtion f(X) and therefore facilitate new research perspectives in comparison with traditional regression models, which primarily focus on causation. Predictive methods also provide a valuable extension to the empirical social scientists' toolkit as new data sources become more prominent. The discussed methods will be implemented using the statistical programming language R.

Psychology

Courses in Psychology are usually only open for incoming exchange students majoring in Psychology. Nominated exchange students will be contacted by their departmental exchange coordinator via e-mail at the end of November/early December (fall semester) or by the end of May/early June (Spring semester) regarding their course choice.

Exchange students from other schools and departments may only attend classes if (a) places are left for other students (b) they have basic knowledge in psychology and statistics (c) the departmental exchange coordinator explicitly approves their participation. In case of further questions, please contact: int-psy@uni-mannheim.de.

AC1/BC1/BF2/BG2: Forschungs- und Anwendungs­techniken/Praxis der A&O-Psychologie Psychological interventions using diary designs (Seminar, englisch)
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
4.0
Kurs geeignet für:
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Registrierungs­informationen:
PSYCHOLOGY EXCHANGE STUDENTS will be contacted by the international affairs coordinator for Psychology (int-psych@uni-mannheim.de) via mail to indicate their course preferences.
 
NON-PSYCHOLOGY EXCHANGE STUDENTS may solely attend if (a) places are left (b) students posses basic knowledge in Psychology and statistics (c) the docent approves participation. For applications please contact the international affairs coordinator for Psychology (int-psych@uni-mannheim.de).
Literatur:

(a more comprehensive list will be available in the first meeting)

Bolger, N., Davis, A., & Rafaeli, E. (2003). Diary methods: Capturing life as it is lived. Annual Review of Psychology, 54, 579-616.

Lischetzke, T., Reis, D., & Arndt, C. (2015). Data-analytic strategies for examining the effectiveness of daily interventions. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 88, 587-622. doi:10.1111/joop.12104

Lektor(en):
Sabine Sonnentag
Beschreibung:

During recent years interventions using diary methods became increasingly popular within several fields of psychology, including health psychology and organizatinal psychology. These interventions use „intensive longitudinal designs“ to apply the treatment and to assess the data and build on daily-survey approaches that aim at „capturing life as it is lived” (Bolger, Davis, Rafaeli, 2003, p. 579). Frequent assessments typically implemented in daily-survey approaches allow for modeling change in affect, attitude, and behavior over time.

In this course we will discuss the nature of diary interventions, the research options they offer, as well as potential problems and challenges.

AC1/BC1: Forschungs- und Anwendungs­techniken I: Programming in R and beyond (Brandt) (Seminar, englisch)
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
4.0
Kurs geeignet für:
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Registrierungs­informationen:
PSYCHOLOGY EXCHANGE STUDENTS will be contacted by the international affairs coordinator for Psychology (int-psych@uni-mannheim.de) via mail to indicate their course preferences.

NON-PSYCHOLOGY EXCHANGE STUDENTS may solely attend if (a) places are left (b) students posses basic knowledge in Psychology and statistics (c) the professor approves participation. For applications please contact the international affairs coordinator for Psychology (int-psych@uni-mannheim.de).

For incoming students 2 additional ECTS are available on fulfilment of further course requirements.
Lektor(en):
Edgar Erdfelder
Beschreibung:
This seminar will provide an introduction how to use R, a powerful programming language that is often used for statistical analyses, simulations, and cognitive modeling. The seminar first will provide a thorough introduction covering the core functionality such as objects, functions, data management, and plotting.
 
The last sessions of the seminar will address how to perform specific statistical analyses in R such as:
* Generalized linear mixed models with lme4 (also known as hierarchical
models)
* Simple structural equation models
* Basic set-up of Monte-Carlo simulations
* Simple cognitive modeling (e.g., signal detection or multinomial processing trees)
 
It is planned that participants practice R in homework assignments and work on small group projects such as analyzing own data, replicating a paper, or running a small simulation.
AE2: Ausgewählte Probleme der Kognitiven Psychologie: Metakognitions­forschung (Seminar, deutsch)
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
4.0
Kurs geeignet für:
Kurssprache:
deutsch
SWS:
2
Literatur:
wird noch bekannt gegeben
Lektor(en):
Edgar Erdfelder
Beschreibung:
Die Metakognitions­forschung untersucht die bemerkenswerte Fähigkeit des Menschen, sein eigenes Denken zu reflektieren. Zutreffende Metakognitionen sind unerlässlich, um sich selbst und andere richtig einzuschätzen und eigenes Verhalten effektiv zu steuern. Aber auf welcher Informations­basis beruhen Metakognitionen? Verfügen auch nichtmenschliche Säugetiere über Metakognitionen? Sind Menschen in der Lage, die Kognitionen anderer Personen zutreffend einschätzen? Wie entwickeln sich Metakognitionen über die Lebensspanne? Auf welche Weise können Metakognitionen gefördert und trainiert werden? Gehen psychische Störungen mit Einschränkungen im Bereich der Metakognitionen einher? In dem Seminar werden diese und weitere Fragen auf Basis aktueller Fach­literatur diskutiert.

Voraussetzungen: 
keine
 
Erworben werden kann:
Leistungs­nachweis gemäß der Prüfungs­ordnung für den Studien­gang M. Sc. Psychologie.
 
Sprechstunde:
Nach Vereinbarung
AE2: Ausgewählte Probleme der Kognitiven Psychologie: Urteilen und Entscheiden (Nadarevic) (Seminar, deutsch)
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
4.0
Kurs geeignet für:
Kurssprache:
deutsch
SWS:
2
Empfohlene Voraussetzungen:
Literatur:
Wird in der Veranstaltung bekanntgegeben.
Lektor(en):
Edgar Erdfelder
Beschreibung:
Inhalt:
Option A oder Option B? Schuldig oder unschuldig? Richtig oder falsch? Menschen müssen tagtäglich viele verschiedene Urteile fällen und Entscheidungen treffen. In diesem Seminar sollen aktuelle kognitions­psychologische Theorien, Modelle und Befunde aus der Urteils- und Entscheidungs­forschung behandelt werden. Dabei erwerben die Teilnehmerinnen und Teilnehmer unter anderem einen Überblick zu folgenden Themen: Soziale Urteilstheorie, Urteilsheuristiken und Urteilsfehler, Häufigkeits- und Wahrscheinlichkeits­urteile, Wahrheitsurteile, Moralurteile, Entscheidungen unter Unsicherheit, Entscheidungs­strategien sowie intuitive und unbewusste Entscheidungen. Im Fokus des Seminars stehen dabei aktuelle Publikationen zur Urteils- und Entscheidungs­forschung, die im Rahmen von Referaten vorgestellt werden sollen und anschließend gemeinsam kritisch diskutiert werden sollen. Aufbauend auf diesen kritischen Überlegungen sollen neue Ideen für zukünftige Untersuchungen generiert werden.

Erworben werden kann:
Leistungs­nachweis gemäß der Prüfungs­ordnung für den Studien­gang M.Sc. Psychologie.

Anmeldung:
Über das Studierenden­portal

Sprechstunde:
Nach Vereinbarung
Nebenfach Medienpsychologie: Spezielle Probleme der Medienpsychologie (Mangold) (Seminar, deutsch)
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
4.0
Kurs geeignet für:
Kurssprache:
deutsch
SWS:
2
Lektor(en):
Edgar Erdfelder
Beschreibung:
Im Seminar werden theoretische Ansätze und empirische Forschungs­ergebnisse der Medienpsychologie zu klassischen Informations- und Unterhaltungs­medien, gerne aber auch zu Internetportalen oder zum Social Web im Rahmen empirischer Projekt­studien vertieft. Nach einer Einführung werden in Arbeits­gruppen zu einer selbst gewählten Fragestellung nach Sichtung des Forschungs­standes Hypothesen hergeleitet. Zu deren Über­prüfung wird ein experimentelles Untesuchungs­design entwickelt und im Rahmen einer Online-Erhebung mit dem Umfragetool UniPark (EFS Survery) durchgeführt. Die erhobenen Daten werden statistisch (SPSS) ausgewertet und im Lichte der Hypothesen interpretiert. Bei der abschließenden Sitzung werden in einem Forschungs­workshop (in Analogie zu einer Fach­konferenz) die Ergebnisse präsentiert und gemeinsam diskutiert.

Anmeldung:
über das Portal

Kontakt:
mangold@hdm-stuttgart.de