A doctoral student is holding a laptop and is pointing out a course on the screen where the schedule for different doctoral courses can be seen.

Spring 2024

  • Accounting

    ACC / TAX 910: Area Seminar Accounting and Taxation
    ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: core course
    Course Number: ACC / TAX 910
    Course Content

    The course focuses on current research topics in the field of accounting and taxation. Visiting researchers present their latest working papers and discuss their ideas with participating faculty and students. The presentations have workshop format and are similar in style to leading scientific conferences. For each presentation, a separate preparation session for the Ph.D. students is offered in advance by rotating faculty. Overall, the course deepens the students’ insights into a variety of research methods that are currently popular in empirical and theoretical research.

    Learning outcomes: Students will learn to follow-up with and discuss about current research topics in accounting and taxation. The interaction with leading researchers will allow them to develop own research ideas and get insights into the design, execution and presentation of research projects.

    Seminar Dates are announced here: https://www.bwl.uni-mannheim.de/en/area-accounting-taxation/research/research-seminar/

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 12.02.24 – 27.05.24 Monday 15:30 – 17:00 room O 048
    Seminar 13.02.24 – 28.05.24 Tuesday 13:45 – 15:15 room SO 318
    ACC / TAX 920: Brown Bag Seminar Empirical Accounting and Taxation
    ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: core course
    Course Number: ACC / TAX 920
    Course Content

    The course is taught in a seminar-style format. Students present their own research ideas at different stages of the project (early ideas, preliminary results, and complete working papers). The presentations involve an interactive discussion between faculty and students about the project’s potential contribution, related literature, research design and interpretation of results.

    Learning outcomes: Students will learn how to present and discuss their own research results in a scientific format. They will become acquainted with acting as a discussant for other topics. Students will gain insights into the assessment of contribution, research design, and interpretation of research papers. The development of these skills is also helpful for writing scientific referee reports.


    Course dates will be announced via email to registered participants.

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 14.02.24 – 29.05.24 Wednesday 13:45 – 17:00 room O 048
    ACC 903: Empirical Accounting Research I (Research Methods)
    6 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: core course
    Course Number: ACC 903
    Credits: 6
    Prerequisites

    -

    Course Content

    This course provides a comprehensive overview of research topics and methods in influential seminal as well as contemporaneous papers in the empirical accounting literature. In particular, we cover after an (1) introduction and a review of some “Accounting Classics”, the literatures on (2) Earnings Management, (3) Valuation (value relevance, earnings response coefficients (ERC)/event studies, accounting-based valuation), (4) Voluntary Disclosure, (5) Mandatory Disclosure, (6) International/-Institutional Accounting and IFRS, and (7) Corporate Narratives. In each session, there is first an overview lecture introducing core methods in the corresponding field, and second a session in which we will jointly discuss in more depth selected empirical methods. Students are expected to prepare all readings and to lead selected class discussions about assigned papers in the second half of each lecture.

    The lectures and student discussions are supplemented by assignments on which bases we discuss topics such as which research fields are currently ‘en vogue’ in the scientific journals, how to ‘stay informed’ and identify potentially relevant regulatory changes, how to know about topics influential researchers are working on, or discuss where students see their individual strength and how they can become competitive researchers in the future.

    Learning outcomes: Students should know about the core issues of existing accounting research and established empirical research methodologies. They should also be able to place current research into the literature and to critically evaluate its relevance and technical rigor, and therefore be able to develop meaningful research ideas to extend current knowledge.

    Form of assessment: Exam (90 minutes) 50 %, paper presentations 50 %

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 13.02.24 – 16.04.24 Tuesday 15:30 – 18:30 tba
    MET: Replication Studies
    5 ECTS
    Course Type: elective course
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    Formal: Prior course registration is required, and regular attendance is expected.

    Recommended: An interest in conducting a replication study which is connected to the PhD project.

    Audit only is not possible.

    Course Content

    Responsible Teacher: Prof. Dr. Dirk Ifenthaler

    Content: Foundation and design of replication studies, reporting replication studies for systematic impact on practice

    Form of assessmant: Presentation 30%; Written Essay 70%

    Competences acquired

    Replication studies add confidence in findings and are necessary to generate a basis for generalisation beyond an original research project. Furthermore, replication studies may identify potential biases in the original study as well as serve as a foundation for confirming or disconfirming prior findings. Students differentiate types for designing replication studies, identify replication studies in their field of PhD, as well as develop a design for conducting a replication study and critically reflect the limitations.

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 14.02.24 – 29.05.24 Wednesday 10:15 – 11:45 SO 322
    RES (Bridge Course): Financial Economics of Climate and Sustainability
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    Pre-requisites and finance context: The course will assume that participants have a background in core graduate-level finance. The course will cover topics from a variety of subfields in finance (asset pricing, financial intermediation, household finance, corporate finance). The introductory block of three classes is intended to orient students to the science of climate change as well as to refresh key concepts from economics and finance; the remaining classes will dive into detail on current research in different subfield. We will conclude with a discussion of open topics in this field. We expect that the course will be useful to doctoral students in finance, economics, and accounting. As a global class, we will be on Zoom.

    Course Content

    The purpose of the course is to (a) introduce graduate students to questions and methods in the rapidly evolving fields of climate/sustainable finance; (b) connect researchers from across the globe interested in this topic to stimulate more rigorous, relevant, and collaborative work. Addressing climate change demands changes in natural, social, and economic systems and will require greater collaboration. In that spirit, this course is being offered by a team of professors from different schools and universities across the globe. Each instructor will deliver one or more lectures and there will be students from a number of different schools.

    Our teaching group consists of current and former AFA and EFA presidents and some of the leading climate finance scholars, including Laura Starks (current AFA President), Patrick Bolton (former AFA President), Stefano Giglio, Marcin Kacperczyk (former EFA President), Caroline Flammer, Geoff Heal, Stefan Reichelstein, Johannes Stroebel, Ben Caldecott and Peter Tufano.

    Course Requirement: Beyond weekly preparation and participation, students will be expected to write a paper either laying out a potential research topic or synthesizing a set of related papers that were not discussed in class. Papers should not exceed eight pages, plus applicable tables and exhibits.

    Schedule
    Lecture
    30.01.24 – 23.04.24 Tuesday 17:00 – 19:00 Zoom
    This session is in person! 20.02.24 Tuesday 16:00 – 17:00 SO 318
    ACC 922: Decarbonization Seminar
    3 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: ACC 922
    Credits: 3
    Course Content

    This course is aimed at doctoral students at GESS. The seminar hosts speakers from academia and industry to discuss latest advances and challenges associated with the transition towards a decarbonized energy economy. Topics covered include the economics and management of sustainability activities and clean energy technologies across all sectors of the economy with a particular focus on the energy sector, transportation services, and carbon-free manufacturing processes.

    Course participants need to attend the seminar talks and the corresponding preparation sessions. In the preparation sessions, students are asked to present a paper and take the role of a discussant. Readings may additionally include recent theory or empirical papers.

    Learning outcomes: The primary objective of the course is to introduce students to current research paradigms on the covered topics and to identify promising avenues for future research. Moreover, students receive a training on how to present and evaluate papers in seminars and conferences.

    Form of assessment: Participation (20%), Paper presentations and discussions (80%)

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 12.02.24 – 27.05.24 Monday 17:15 – 18:45 O 131
    ACC 924: Analytical Reading Group
    3 ECTS
    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: ACC 924
    Credits: 3
    Course Content

    The meetings discuss recent advances in analytical accounting, tax, or organizations research. The focus of the discussion is the academic rigor of the studies, the relevance of the topic, and the writing style of the authors to learn more about the means of getting academic papers published in top peer-reviewed journals.

    Every participant must serve as a moderator at least once. Active participation in the discussions of all other sessions is expected. In addition, the participants are asked to provide a written report in the style of an academic journal review for one paper that they did not moderate. For this purpose, a preparation session and feedback session for the moderation and the written report is additionally required.

    Form of assessment: Participation (25%), Paper moderation (25%), and written assignment (50%)

    Responsible teacher: Dr. Sebastian Kronenberger

    Competences acquired

    The primary objective of the course is to introduce students to current research paradigms on the covered topics and to identify promising avenues for future research. Moreover, students receive a training on how to present and evaluate papers in seminars and conferences.

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 01.03.24 – 01.03.24 Friday 12:00 – 13:30 ZOOM-Lehre-014 (please enter via Portal2)
    Lecture 15.03.24 – 15.03.24 Friday 12:00 – 13:30 ZOOM-Lehre-014 (please enter via Portal2)
    Lecture 19.04.24 – 19.04.24 Friday 12:00 – 13:30 ZOOM-Lehre-014 (please enter via Portal2)
    Lecture 17.05.24 – 17.05.24 Friday 12:00 – 13:30 ZOOM-Lehre-014 (please enter via Portal2)
    Lecture 14.06.24 – 14.06.24 Friday 12:00 – 13:30 ZOOM-Lehre-014 (please enter via Portal2)
    Lecture 19.07.24 – 19.07.24 Friday 12:00 – 13:30 ZOOM-Lehre-014 (please enter via Portal2)
    CDSS Job Talk Series: Next GESS
    0 ECTS
    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: CDSS Job Talk Series
    Course Content

    Johannes Lattmann is the recipient of the 2023 CDSS Young Scholar Award, which he received for his project 'Next GESS – Career Talks for PhD and Master students with Industry, NGOs, and Policy Institutions'.

    For this upcoming semester he organized the “Next GESS” Job Talk Series for doctoral students. Every Thursday, from 16.30 – 17.30 he invites a speaker to talk Online via Zoom about their job and career. The precise schedule can be found in the Syllabus which you can find in the appendix.

    In the context of this series, he has invited speakers from a variety of companies and institutions including IBM, CEPS, OECD, UNESCO and many more. Through their experiences, this series aims to provide insights into exciting career trajectories. Eventually, this series should inform you about career opportunities and provide valuable insights about application processes and the day-to-day work life in different institutions. 

    Each session contains a 15–20 minutes long presentation by the speaker, introducing the respective job or institution. This is followed by a Q&A session in which you can ask questions. 

    Talk schedule

    IS 809: Advanced Data Science Lab II (Text Mining)
    6 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: IS 809
    Credits: 6
    Course Content

    The goal of this lab exercises is to guide students through the typical steps of a scientific data-science project from problem formulation to data acquisition, selection of methods, analysis and presentation / documentation. The focus of this lab will be on analyzing textual data, for example large scale news or social media datasets, using techniques and methods from the domain of natural language processing. The students will present their results and write a paper about their research.

    Learning Goals: Students will be equipped with practical experience with conducting scientific data-science projects. They will train their presentation skills, learn to communicate in research projects and receive feedback.

    Examination: Written elaboration (90%) and presentation (10%)

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 13.02.24 – 28.05.24 Tuesday 13:45 – 17:00 room 314–315 (L 15, 1–6)
    MET 931: Topics in Advanced Sampling Methods: Design and Causal Inference
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: MET 931
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    The reading course is aimed at Ph.D. students in or beyond their second year to support them during their research phase. 1st year PhD students are welcomed to attend the class as well.

    Recommended: Knowledge of basic statistics and prior experience with R or Stata is helpful, but not necessary.

    Course Content

    This reading course provides a hands-on and paper-based approach to understanding and analyzing data. For many projects, collection of new data or experimental designs are the only way to answer a research question or to provide the decisive complementary evidence. Different ways to collect data can have important implications for model estimation and evaluation, parameter inference, and policy conclusions. Standard econometric methods start from assumptions about the sampling procedure and try to cope with the limitations of a given dataset. Instead, we start at the design stage and examine the interplay between sampling and experimental methods, statistical inference and estimation of causal effects. We will use the German Business Panel as point in case and implement cutting-edge methods to gain insights into the causal mechanisms behind reported outcomes. In each session, one of the participants will present a research paper, which we will discuss in light of concrete implementation at trial scale. Participants are encouraged to present research that is valuable for their own thesis or may be assigned to present a topic.

    In addition to presenting a paper and participating in the discussion, students are expected to write a short technical report that summarizes the methods and implications in a way useful for peers who want to use the newly collected data or learn about experimental results.

    Learning outcomes:

    The specific applications cover a broad set of skills with a focus on design of questionnaires and survey experiments, data analysis and quantitative methods, classification, inference, writing of own reports, and opportunities for own research.

    • Analytical Skills/Problem-Solving:
    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 13.02.24 – 28.05.24 Tuesday 10:15 – 11:45 room O 048
    RES (bridge course): Mental health during dissertations: “Research is Me-Search” (GESS doctoral students only)
    5 ECTS
    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: RES (bridge course)
    Credits: 5
    Course Content

    Almost every doctoral dissertation is marked by difficult periods and times of frustration, which can also affect one´s mental health.

    Not only aspects directly related to one's dissertation but also structural and/or personal aspects can make it challenging to maintain one's mental health.

    The aim of this course is to get to know and discuss typical risk factors and challenging constellations doctoral students are likely to face during their dissertations. The course will consist of literature-informed/guided group discussions of several predefined topics addressing common difficulties during dissertation projects. During the first session(s), the group will decide the particular topics of interest for each of the sessions based on a brief literature discussion and their personal interests. Then, based on selected literature provided by the lecturer, the students will discuss these topics both from an academic standpoint and from their individual perspective/experience during their dissertation project. Each session will thus serve as information input and offer room for discussion and exchange. The aim of this format is to foster student's knowledge about mental health during dissertation projects and open up possibilities to reflect one´s own situation and standpoints in a group of peers.

    The course will be taught by Dr. Matthias Volz

    Course  requirements & assessment

    Students need to be willing to read articles, and discuss and articulate their own views on typical challenging situations during dissertation projects in guided group discussions.

    Schedule
    Seminar
    bi-weekly 20.02.24 – 19.03.24 Tuesday 10:15 – 11:45 209 in B6, 30–32
    bi-weekly 09.04.24 – 21.05.24 Tuesday 10:15 – 11:45 209 in B6, 30–32
    RES (Bridge Course): New Perspectives on Economics and Politics
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: RES (Bridge Course)
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    Prerequisites: For each session, students need to have read the respective book in advance. (Detailed schedule will be provided in an introductory session.)

    Form of Assessment: Essay 50 %, Class Participation 50 %


    Friedman, M. (1963). Capitalism and Freedom. University of Chicago Press.
    Deaton, A. (2023). Economics in America: An Immigrant Economist Explores the Land of Inequality. Princeton University Press.
    Sandel, M. J. (2020). The Tyranny of Merit: What’s Become of the Common Good?. Penguin UK.
    Bowles, S. (2016). The moral economy. Yale University Press.
    Formal: Students need to be enrolled a PhD program at the GESS at the University of Mannheim, or the Master of Political Science.
    Required: Willingness to read, discuss, challenge, engage and think for yourself is critical for this course.

    Course Content

    We live in interesting times both, economically and politically. Many observers point to crises and uncertain developments in the economic and political world. Making sense of the nature of these challenges and pointing toward economic and political solutions for the future requires new perspectives. This is a course about the big and bold questions in economics and politics. How can or should economics and politics be organized to best serve society? What does it mean to put humans as they really are at the center of economic and political thinking? What role do morals and values, or dignity and respect, play for the way economics and politics work? What are the implications of digitalization for capitalism and freedom?

    We will try to come to grips with these questions by reading and discussing four key books on various new perspectives at the intersection between economics and politics. The aim of this course is to go as deep as we can and to get as much out of an in-class discussion of the material as possible. Willingness to acquire and read the books is a must. If you are unsure about whether or not you would want to take on the commitment of reading four books in one semester then this course is probably not the right one for you.

    Students need to be willing to read books, form their own opinions on them, and elaborate on and defend their own views in group discussions and a final essay.

    We will meet for an introductory session on Monday 4.3. at 13.45–15.15 and then meet again for a total of seven Thursday and Wednesday sessions after the Easter break: 11.4., 25.4., 2.5., 8.5., 16.5., 23.5., and 29.5. at 8.30–11.45.

    Competences acquired

    Learning outcomes: The aim of this course is to engage in intellectual dialogue, to develop a personal point of view on some of the central economic and political questions we face today, and to allow ourselves to think creatively, freely, and out of the box. After completing this course, students will have read important texts on new perspectives in economics and politics, they will have trained their ability to distill an own point of view from the writings of leading scientists, they will train their writing and discussion skills, and they will train to creatively apply what they have read in writing about the future of economics and politics in our society.

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Introduction to the Course 04.03.24 – 04.03.24 Monday 13:45 – 15:15 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 11.04.24 – 11.04.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 25.04.24 – 25.04.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 02.05.24 – 02.05.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 08.05.24 – 08.05.24 Wednesday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 16.05.24 – 16.05.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 B6, 23–25, Room A301
    Lecture 23.05.24 – 23.05.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 29.05.24 – 29.05.24 Wednesday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
  • Finance

    FIN 620: Behavioral Finance
    6 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: core course
    Course Number: FIN 620
    Credits: 6
    Prerequisites

    Formal: Module FIN 5XX

    Recommended: Every student participating in this course should have completed the 2-semester finance module of the Mannheim Bachelor program (or equivalent courses) and the module Decisions Analysis. The lecture generally assumes basic knowledge in mathematics (calculus, optimization) and statistics (mean, variance, standard deviation).

    Course Content

    This course is for participants of FIN 901 only.

    There is abundant evidence suggesting that the standard economic paradigm of rational investors does not adequately describe behavior in financial markets. Behavioral Finance examines how individuals' attitudes and behavior affect their financial decisions. This course reviews recent research on possible mispricing in financial markets due to the nature of psychological biases. Moreover the course deals with behavioral finance models explaining investor behavior or market anomalies when rational models provide no sufficient explanations. Topics will include among others overconfidence, prospect theory, heuristic driven biases and frame dependence.

    Learning outcomes: Behavioral finance applies scientific research on human and social cognitive and emotional biases. After completing this course, students will be able to better understand economic decisions and how they affect market prices and returns. They will know how behavioral findings are integrated with neo-classical theory.

    Form of assessment: Exam (60 minutes)

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 15.02.24 – 21.03.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 O 129
    Lecture 11.03.24 – 11.03.24 Monday 17:15 – 20:30 O 048
    Tutorial
    Tutorial 21.02.24 – 24.04.24 Wednesday 10:15 – 11:45 room O 135 (Saal der starken Marken)
    FIN 803: Corporate Finance
    6 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: core course
    Course Number: FIN 803
    Credits: 6
    Prerequisites

    Formal: E 701, E 703, FIN 801

    Recommended:

    • A first-year doctoral level course in microeconomics that covers game theory and information economics (signalling, adverse selection, equilibrium refinements)

    • A first-year doctoral level course in econometrics that covers estimation and testing theory.

    • Some familiarity with corporate finance and financial institutions at the level of a master’s level course is also assumed, but not essential. If you have no prior knowledge of corporate finance, then some chapters in an MBA-level textbook (e.g. Brealey, Myers, and Allen, Principles of Corporate Finance, 11th edition, McGraw Hill 2013; Berk and DeMarzo, Corporate Finance, 3rd edition, Pearson 2013) would be useful.

    Course Content

    This course is intended to enable students to understand and conduct research in corporate finance. It is taught at a first-year doctoral level.

    Learning outcomes: The course combines two objectives. Firstly, participants learn the classic contributions to the theory of modern corporate finance and understand the main contributions to the field. Secondly, the course also introduces some of the main empirical contributions to the field and studies the main econometric and statistical techniques used in corporate finance. At the end of the course participants should be familiar with the main empirical and theoretical tools used in corporate finance.

    Form of assessment: 24h-take-home exam

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 23.02.24 – 23.02.24 Friday 08:30 – 12:30 room 409 (L 9, 1–2)
    Lecture 08.03.24 – 17.05.24 Friday 08:30 – 12:30 room 409 (L 9, 1–2)
    FIN 804: Econometrics of Financial Markets
    6 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: core course
    Course Number: FIN 804
    Credits: 6
    Prerequisites

    Recommended: Students should have successfully completed the 2-semester finance module of the Mannheim Bachelor program (or equivalent). It is recommended but not required that the students have participated in the Mathematics for Economists (E 700), Advanced Econometrics (FIN703) and the Asset Pricing (FIN 805) courses. Students need a good command of English and are expected to be able to read and discuss current research papers.

    Course Content

    The course provides a refresher of several econometric concepts such as endogeneity, identification and selection. The focus of the course will be on causal inference. We will discuss the Rubin causal model, instrumental variable regressions, regression discontinuity, difference-in-difference, matching, and fixed effects estimation. Particular attention will be given to underlying assumptions. Empirical applications from finance will be critically discussed.

    Learning outcomes: The course provides students with a knowledge of several econometric concepts and their applications in finance and contributes to students’ ability to plan and carry out independent empirical research.

    Form of assessment: Essay (40%), Presentation (60%)

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 19.03.24 – 19.03.24 Tuesday 10:15 – 11:45 room 210 (L 9, 1–2)
    Lecture 09.04.24 – 07.05.24 Tuesday 08:30 – 11:45 room 210 (L 9, 1–2)
    FIN 901: Behavioral Finance
    2 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: core course
    Course Number: FIN 901
    Credits: 2
    Course Content

    FIN 901 is a continuative course of FIN 620. In this course students discuss and present current research topics in behavioral finance.

    Learning outcomes: Students learn to critically discuss current research papers, i.e. data, methodology, and reasoning.

    Form of assessment: Presentation

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Kick-off 15.02.24 Thursday 11:45 – 12:45 O 129
    FIN 910: Area Seminar Finance
    ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: core course
    Course Number: FIN 910
    Course Content

    The course focuses on current research topics in the field of finance. Visiting researchers present their latest working papers and discuss their ideas with participating faculty and students. The presentations have workshop format and are similar in style to leading scientific conferences. The course introduces students to the variety of research methods that are currently popular in empirical and theoretical research.

    Form of assessment: Oral participation.


    Seminar Dates are announced here.

    Competences acquired

    Students will learn to follow-up with and discuss about current research topics in finance. The interaction with leading researchers will allow them to develop own research ideas and get insights into the design, execution and presentation of research projects.

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 12.02.24 – 27.05.24 Monday 15:30 – 17:00 room 004 (L 9, 1–2) and online (via zoom)
    MET: Replication Studies
    5 ECTS
    Course Type: elective course
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    Formal: Prior course registration is required, and regular attendance is expected.

    Recommended: An interest in conducting a replication study which is connected to the PhD project.

    Audit only is not possible.

    Course Content

    Responsible Teacher: Prof. Dr. Dirk Ifenthaler

    Content: Foundation and design of replication studies, reporting replication studies for systematic impact on practice

    Form of assessmant: Presentation 30%; Written Essay 70%

    Competences acquired

    Replication studies add confidence in findings and are necessary to generate a basis for generalisation beyond an original research project. Furthermore, replication studies may identify potential biases in the original study as well as serve as a foundation for confirming or disconfirming prior findings. Students differentiate types for designing replication studies, identify replication studies in their field of PhD, as well as develop a design for conducting a replication study and critically reflect the limitations.

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 14.02.24 – 29.05.24 Wednesday 10:15 – 11:45 SO 322
    RES (Bridge Course): Financial Economics of Climate and Sustainability
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    Pre-requisites and finance context: The course will assume that participants have a background in core graduate-level finance. The course will cover topics from a variety of subfields in finance (asset pricing, financial intermediation, household finance, corporate finance). The introductory block of three classes is intended to orient students to the science of climate change as well as to refresh key concepts from economics and finance; the remaining classes will dive into detail on current research in different subfield. We will conclude with a discussion of open topics in this field. We expect that the course will be useful to doctoral students in finance, economics, and accounting. As a global class, we will be on Zoom.

    Course Content

    The purpose of the course is to (a) introduce graduate students to questions and methods in the rapidly evolving fields of climate/sustainable finance; (b) connect researchers from across the globe interested in this topic to stimulate more rigorous, relevant, and collaborative work. Addressing climate change demands changes in natural, social, and economic systems and will require greater collaboration. In that spirit, this course is being offered by a team of professors from different schools and universities across the globe. Each instructor will deliver one or more lectures and there will be students from a number of different schools.

    Our teaching group consists of current and former AFA and EFA presidents and some of the leading climate finance scholars, including Laura Starks (current AFA President), Patrick Bolton (former AFA President), Stefano Giglio, Marcin Kacperczyk (former EFA President), Caroline Flammer, Geoff Heal, Stefan Reichelstein, Johannes Stroebel, Ben Caldecott and Peter Tufano.

    Course Requirement: Beyond weekly preparation and participation, students will be expected to write a paper either laying out a potential research topic or synthesizing a set of related papers that were not discussed in class. Papers should not exceed eight pages, plus applicable tables and exhibits.

    Schedule
    Lecture
    30.01.24 – 23.04.24 Tuesday 17:00 – 19:00 Zoom
    This session is in person! 20.02.24 Tuesday 16:00 – 17:00 SO 318
    ACC 922: Decarbonization Seminar
    3 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: ACC 922
    Credits: 3
    Course Content

    This course is aimed at doctoral students at GESS. The seminar hosts speakers from academia and industry to discuss latest advances and challenges associated with the transition towards a decarbonized energy economy. Topics covered include the economics and management of sustainability activities and clean energy technologies across all sectors of the economy with a particular focus on the energy sector, transportation services, and carbon-free manufacturing processes.

    Course participants need to attend the seminar talks and the corresponding preparation sessions. In the preparation sessions, students are asked to present a paper and take the role of a discussant. Readings may additionally include recent theory or empirical papers.

    Learning outcomes: The primary objective of the course is to introduce students to current research paradigms on the covered topics and to identify promising avenues for future research. Moreover, students receive a training on how to present and evaluate papers in seminars and conferences.

    Form of assessment: Participation (20%), Paper presentations and discussions (80%)

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 12.02.24 – 27.05.24 Monday 17:15 – 18:45 O 131
    CDSS Job Talk Series: Next GESS
    0 ECTS
    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: CDSS Job Talk Series
    Course Content

    Johannes Lattmann is the recipient of the 2023 CDSS Young Scholar Award, which he received for his project 'Next GESS – Career Talks for PhD and Master students with Industry, NGOs, and Policy Institutions'.

    For this upcoming semester he organized the “Next GESS” Job Talk Series for doctoral students. Every Thursday, from 16.30 – 17.30 he invites a speaker to talk Online via Zoom about their job and career. The precise schedule can be found in the Syllabus which you can find in the appendix.

    In the context of this series, he has invited speakers from a variety of companies and institutions including IBM, CEPS, OECD, UNESCO and many more. Through their experiences, this series aims to provide insights into exciting career trajectories. Eventually, this series should inform you about career opportunities and provide valuable insights about application processes and the day-to-day work life in different institutions. 

    Each session contains a 15–20 minutes long presentation by the speaker, introducing the respective job or institution. This is followed by a Q&A session in which you can ask questions. 

    Talk schedule

    FIN 802: Continuous Time Finance
    8 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: FIN 802
    Credits: 8
    Prerequisites

    FIN 801

    Course Content

    Itô calculus, stochastic differential equations, Black-Scholes theory, hedging and arbitrage pricing of European, American, and exotic options, complete and incomplete market models, consumption investment problems, term structure theory for volatility and interest rates, default risk

    Learning outcomes: The course aims at providing the basic concepts and techniques for modelling and analysing financial price processes in continuous time.

    Form of assessment: Term paper 90 %, participation 10 %

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 27.02.24 – 27.02.24 Tuesday 09:00 – 17:00 L9, 1–2, 210
    Lecture 12.03.24 – 12.03.24 Tuesday 09:00 – 17:00 L9, 1–2, 210
    Lecture 25.04.24 – 25.04.24 Thursday 09:00 – 17:00 L9, 1–2, 210
    FIN 923: Mutual Fund and Hedge Fund Research
    6 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: FIN 923
    Credits: 6
    Course Content

    This is a doctoral level course introducing students to current theoretical and empirical research on delegated portfolio management, in particular on mutual funds and hedge funds. It covers classic questions like the role of mutual funds/hedge funds in equilibrium, how mutual funds and hedge funds perform, what matters to investors, how managers behave and respond to incentives, and what policies fund families follow. It also covers important and recent industry trends like the active vs. passive investing debate and ESG investing with funds.

    In each class, the instructors will give an introduction and overview of the topic covered in the specific session. Students will then present assigned papers (1–2), including a critical discussion of the contribution and possibly ideas for future research. On the last class day, students will present the results of their own empirical studies.

    Form of assessment: Presentation(s) and Research Project

    The grade each student receives is calculated as the weighted average of two components:

    1. Each student has to present and critically discuss one or two assigned papers (counting for 50% of the final grade).
    2. Each student has to present a research project (counting for 50% of the final grade)

    Submission of the research project in written form is due on Sunday, May 12th, midnight. The research project proposal should not be longer than 10 pages and include a summary, a literature review, and a description where and how to collect the necessary data (in case it is an empirical project). Empirical results for the project are desired, but not necessarily expected

    Active course participation is mandatory.

    Please note that the lecturers will schedule the sessions, so that there is no overlap with other compulsory finance courses. There will be no Finance Research Seminar on 19 Feburary 2024.

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Kickoff 05.02.24 – 05.02.24 Monday 14:00 – 16:00 ZOOM-Lehre-039 (enter via portal2)
    Lecture 19.02.24 – 19.02.24 Monday 10:15 – 18:45 B6, 30–32, room 211
    Lecture 20.02.24 – 20.02.24 Tuesday 08:30 – 18:45 B6, 30–32, room 008.1
    Lecture 21.02.24 – 21.02.24 Wednesday 08:30 – 17:00 B6, 30–32, room 209, from 12:00 in room 008.1
    Lecture 22.02.24 – 22.02.24 Thursday 13:45 – 18:45 B6, 30–32, room 008.1
    Lecture 23.02.24 – 23.02.24 Friday 08:30 – 17:00 B6, 30–32, room 209
    Final Presentations 13.05.24 – 13.05.24 Monday 09:15 – 17:30 B 6, 30–32, tba
    Final Presentations 16.05.24 – 16.05.24 Thursday 09:15 – 17:30 B 6, 30–32, tba
    FIN 924: Seminar in Empirical Banking
    3 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: FIN 924
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites

    The seminar is designed for second-year doctoral students with a focus on finance. Doctoral students in other years and from related fields with an interest in banking are welcome. Sound knowledge in econometrics is strongly recommended. Knowledge on financial intermediation and financial institutions is helpful but not mandatory.

    If you are unsure whether this course is for you, please feel free to reach out to the lecturer.

    Course Content

    This seminar introduces students to research in banking and aims at enabling them to contribute to this field. The first part of the course consists of interactive lectures. These lectures introduce students to seminal and current research on financial intermediation, financial stability, and the role of banks in green finance. Additionally, the lectures provide guidance on how to develop impactful research ideas, how to present research, and how to critically evaluate and discuss existing research. Applicability of this guidance is not limited to the field of banking. The second part of the course offers students an opportunity to practice these skills and to develop a deeper understanding of the literature. To this end, students will read, present, and discuss papers. Moreover, they will develop a research idea.

    Form of assessment:

    Presentation (25%), discussion (25%), written research proposal (50%)

    Each student will present a paper, discuss a paper, and write a research proposal on a topic broadly related to the subject of the course. The proposal should aim at detailing an idea for a research project that has the potential for publication in a top-tier journal. The text can be kept to a few pages. Implementation of the idea is welcome but by no means expected for the course.

    Course Times:

    Dates and times for Lecture 2 and the presentation sessions are preliminary.

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 14.03.24 Thursday 13:00 – 17:00 L 9, 1–2, room 210
    Lecture 11.04.24 Thursday 13:00 – 17:00 SO 322
    Presentations 26.04.24 Friday 13:00 – 19:00 O 129
    Presentations 16.05.24 Thursday 13:00 – 19:00 SO 322
    IS 809: Advanced Data Science Lab II (Text Mining)
    6 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: IS 809
    Credits: 6
    Course Content

    The goal of this lab exercises is to guide students through the typical steps of a scientific data-science project from problem formulation to data acquisition, selection of methods, analysis and presentation / documentation. The focus of this lab will be on analyzing textual data, for example large scale news or social media datasets, using techniques and methods from the domain of natural language processing. The students will present their results and write a paper about their research.

    Learning Goals: Students will be equipped with practical experience with conducting scientific data-science projects. They will train their presentation skills, learn to communicate in research projects and receive feedback.

    Examination: Written elaboration (90%) and presentation (10%)

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 13.02.24 – 28.05.24 Tuesday 13:45 – 17:00 room 314–315 (L 15, 1–6)
    MET 931: Topics in Advanced Sampling Methods: Design and Causal Inference
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: MET 931
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    The reading course is aimed at Ph.D. students in or beyond their second year to support them during their research phase. 1st year PhD students are welcomed to attend the class as well.

    Recommended: Knowledge of basic statistics and prior experience with R or Stata is helpful, but not necessary.

    Course Content

    This reading course provides a hands-on and paper-based approach to understanding and analyzing data. For many projects, collection of new data or experimental designs are the only way to answer a research question or to provide the decisive complementary evidence. Different ways to collect data can have important implications for model estimation and evaluation, parameter inference, and policy conclusions. Standard econometric methods start from assumptions about the sampling procedure and try to cope with the limitations of a given dataset. Instead, we start at the design stage and examine the interplay between sampling and experimental methods, statistical inference and estimation of causal effects. We will use the German Business Panel as point in case and implement cutting-edge methods to gain insights into the causal mechanisms behind reported outcomes. In each session, one of the participants will present a research paper, which we will discuss in light of concrete implementation at trial scale. Participants are encouraged to present research that is valuable for their own thesis or may be assigned to present a topic.

    In addition to presenting a paper and participating in the discussion, students are expected to write a short technical report that summarizes the methods and implications in a way useful for peers who want to use the newly collected data or learn about experimental results.

    Learning outcomes:

    The specific applications cover a broad set of skills with a focus on design of questionnaires and survey experiments, data analysis and quantitative methods, classification, inference, writing of own reports, and opportunities for own research.

    • Analytical Skills/Problem-Solving:
    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 13.02.24 – 28.05.24 Tuesday 10:15 – 11:45 room O 048
    RES (bridge course): Mental health during dissertations: “Research is Me-Search” (GESS doctoral students only)
    5 ECTS
    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: RES (bridge course)
    Credits: 5
    Course Content

    Almost every doctoral dissertation is marked by difficult periods and times of frustration, which can also affect one´s mental health.

    Not only aspects directly related to one's dissertation but also structural and/or personal aspects can make it challenging to maintain one's mental health.

    The aim of this course is to get to know and discuss typical risk factors and challenging constellations doctoral students are likely to face during their dissertations. The course will consist of literature-informed/guided group discussions of several predefined topics addressing common difficulties during dissertation projects. During the first session(s), the group will decide the particular topics of interest for each of the sessions based on a brief literature discussion and their personal interests. Then, based on selected literature provided by the lecturer, the students will discuss these topics both from an academic standpoint and from their individual perspective/experience during their dissertation project. Each session will thus serve as information input and offer room for discussion and exchange. The aim of this format is to foster student's knowledge about mental health during dissertation projects and open up possibilities to reflect one´s own situation and standpoints in a group of peers.

    The course will be taught by Dr. Matthias Volz

    Course  requirements & assessment

    Students need to be willing to read articles, and discuss and articulate their own views on typical challenging situations during dissertation projects in guided group discussions.

    Schedule
    Seminar
    bi-weekly 20.02.24 – 19.03.24 Tuesday 10:15 – 11:45 209 in B6, 30–32
    bi-weekly 09.04.24 – 21.05.24 Tuesday 10:15 – 11:45 209 in B6, 30–32
    RES (Bridge Course): New Perspectives on Economics and Politics
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: RES (Bridge Course)
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    Prerequisites: For each session, students need to have read the respective book in advance. (Detailed schedule will be provided in an introductory session.)

    Form of Assessment: Essay 50 %, Class Participation 50 %


    Friedman, M. (1963). Capitalism and Freedom. University of Chicago Press.
    Deaton, A. (2023). Economics in America: An Immigrant Economist Explores the Land of Inequality. Princeton University Press.
    Sandel, M. J. (2020). The Tyranny of Merit: What’s Become of the Common Good?. Penguin UK.
    Bowles, S. (2016). The moral economy. Yale University Press.
    Formal: Students need to be enrolled a PhD program at the GESS at the University of Mannheim, or the Master of Political Science.
    Required: Willingness to read, discuss, challenge, engage and think for yourself is critical for this course.

    Course Content

    We live in interesting times both, economically and politically. Many observers point to crises and uncertain developments in the economic and political world. Making sense of the nature of these challenges and pointing toward economic and political solutions for the future requires new perspectives. This is a course about the big and bold questions in economics and politics. How can or should economics and politics be organized to best serve society? What does it mean to put humans as they really are at the center of economic and political thinking? What role do morals and values, or dignity and respect, play for the way economics and politics work? What are the implications of digitalization for capitalism and freedom?

    We will try to come to grips with these questions by reading and discussing four key books on various new perspectives at the intersection between economics and politics. The aim of this course is to go as deep as we can and to get as much out of an in-class discussion of the material as possible. Willingness to acquire and read the books is a must. If you are unsure about whether or not you would want to take on the commitment of reading four books in one semester then this course is probably not the right one for you.

    Students need to be willing to read books, form their own opinions on them, and elaborate on and defend their own views in group discussions and a final essay.

    We will meet for an introductory session on Monday 4.3. at 13.45–15.15 and then meet again for a total of seven Thursday and Wednesday sessions after the Easter break: 11.4., 25.4., 2.5., 8.5., 16.5., 23.5., and 29.5. at 8.30–11.45.

    Competences acquired

    Learning outcomes: The aim of this course is to engage in intellectual dialogue, to develop a personal point of view on some of the central economic and political questions we face today, and to allow ourselves to think creatively, freely, and out of the box. After completing this course, students will have read important texts on new perspectives in economics and politics, they will have trained their ability to distill an own point of view from the writings of leading scientists, they will train their writing and discussion skills, and they will train to creatively apply what they have read in writing about the future of economics and politics in our society.

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Introduction to the Course 04.03.24 – 04.03.24 Monday 13:45 – 15:15 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 11.04.24 – 11.04.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 25.04.24 – 25.04.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 02.05.24 – 02.05.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 08.05.24 – 08.05.24 Wednesday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 16.05.24 – 16.05.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 B6, 23–25, Room A301
    Lecture 23.05.24 – 23.05.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 29.05.24 – 29.05.24 Wednesday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
  • Information Systems

    IS / OPM 910: Area Seminar Information Systems and Operations Management
    ECTS
    Course Type: core course
    Course Number: IS / OPM 910
    Course Content

    The course focuses on current research topics in the field of information systems and operations management. Visiting researchers present their latest working papers and discuss their ideas with participating faculty and students. The course introduces students to the variety of research methods that are currently popular in empirical and theoretical research.

    Competences acquired

    Students will learn to follow-up with and discuss about current research topics in information systems and operations management. The interaction with leading researchers will allow them to develop own research ideas and get insights into the design, execution and presentation of research projects.

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 14.02.24 – 29.05.24 Wednesday 12:00 – 13:30 O 148
    IS 903: Information Systems Theories
    8 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: core course
    Course Number: IS 903
    Credits: 8
    Course Content

    Knowledge creation and dissemination are key objectives of scientific endeavors. However, what constitutes knowledge is a highly contested issue. Certainly, at the core of social science disciplines, knowledge is inseparable from theory. Indeed, to seek theory-guided explanations of real-world phenomenon is what separates scholars from consultants, who seek to change reality without explaining it, and from journalists, who report reality but do not explain it. The pursuit of theory drives us to understand reality—to discover truth—before making recommendations on how to change reality. To pursue theory is to pursue knowledge; to pursue knowledge is to advance humanity. Consequently, many scholars emphasize the centrality of theories for any scientific endeavor—a thought widely reflected in many disciplines from the natural to the social sciences. While attention to theoretical work has been at the heart of the Information Systems (IS) discipline for a long time, the focus on theoretical debates and genuine conceptual contributions has been picking up recently. This is reflected by a number of journal sections and conference tracks dedicated to advancing theory and theorizing in IS research just as much as in many authors’ experiences during the reviews of their work.

    This course invites participants to join the ongoing discourse on theories and theorizing in the IS research community. It is designed to help participants build and extend their understanding of the nature and role of theory in IS research. Through discussions and analyses of current theoretical developments in the IS discipline and some of its main reference disciplines, participants will engage with theory and advance their skills of crafting their own theoretical contributions and evaluating those of others.

    Learning outcomes:

    • Understand the importance and usefulness of theory in research
    • Learn theorizing strategies
    • Learn to evaluate theoretical contribution in research
    • Develop basic theorizing skills
    • Identify a theory that could be applicable to the participants’ own research programs

    Form of assessment: Written elaboration 60%, presentation 20%, discussion 20%

    Schedule
    Lecture
    19.03.24 – 04.06.24 Tuesday 12:00 – 13:30 L 15, 1–6, Room 714
    MET: Replication Studies
    5 ECTS
    Course Type: elective course
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    Formal: Prior course registration is required, and regular attendance is expected.

    Recommended: An interest in conducting a replication study which is connected to the PhD project.

    Audit only is not possible.

    Course Content

    Responsible Teacher: Prof. Dr. Dirk Ifenthaler

    Content: Foundation and design of replication studies, reporting replication studies for systematic impact on practice

    Form of assessmant: Presentation 30%; Written Essay 70%

    Competences acquired

    Replication studies add confidence in findings and are necessary to generate a basis for generalisation beyond an original research project. Furthermore, replication studies may identify potential biases in the original study as well as serve as a foundation for confirming or disconfirming prior findings. Students differentiate types for designing replication studies, identify replication studies in their field of PhD, as well as develop a design for conducting a replication study and critically reflect the limitations.

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 14.02.24 – 29.05.24 Wednesday 10:15 – 11:45 SO 322
    RES (Bridge Course): Financial Economics of Climate and Sustainability
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    Pre-requisites and finance context: The course will assume that participants have a background in core graduate-level finance. The course will cover topics from a variety of subfields in finance (asset pricing, financial intermediation, household finance, corporate finance). The introductory block of three classes is intended to orient students to the science of climate change as well as to refresh key concepts from economics and finance; the remaining classes will dive into detail on current research in different subfield. We will conclude with a discussion of open topics in this field. We expect that the course will be useful to doctoral students in finance, economics, and accounting. As a global class, we will be on Zoom.

    Course Content

    The purpose of the course is to (a) introduce graduate students to questions and methods in the rapidly evolving fields of climate/sustainable finance; (b) connect researchers from across the globe interested in this topic to stimulate more rigorous, relevant, and collaborative work. Addressing climate change demands changes in natural, social, and economic systems and will require greater collaboration. In that spirit, this course is being offered by a team of professors from different schools and universities across the globe. Each instructor will deliver one or more lectures and there will be students from a number of different schools.

    Our teaching group consists of current and former AFA and EFA presidents and some of the leading climate finance scholars, including Laura Starks (current AFA President), Patrick Bolton (former AFA President), Stefano Giglio, Marcin Kacperczyk (former EFA President), Caroline Flammer, Geoff Heal, Stefan Reichelstein, Johannes Stroebel, Ben Caldecott and Peter Tufano.

    Course Requirement: Beyond weekly preparation and participation, students will be expected to write a paper either laying out a potential research topic or synthesizing a set of related papers that were not discussed in class. Papers should not exceed eight pages, plus applicable tables and exhibits.

    Schedule
    Lecture
    30.01.24 – 23.04.24 Tuesday 17:00 – 19:00 Zoom
    This session is in person! 20.02.24 Tuesday 16:00 – 17:00 SO 318
    ACC 922: Decarbonization Seminar
    3 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: ACC 922
    Credits: 3
    Course Content

    This course is aimed at doctoral students at GESS. The seminar hosts speakers from academia and industry to discuss latest advances and challenges associated with the transition towards a decarbonized energy economy. Topics covered include the economics and management of sustainability activities and clean energy technologies across all sectors of the economy with a particular focus on the energy sector, transportation services, and carbon-free manufacturing processes.

    Course participants need to attend the seminar talks and the corresponding preparation sessions. In the preparation sessions, students are asked to present a paper and take the role of a discussant. Readings may additionally include recent theory or empirical papers.

    Learning outcomes: The primary objective of the course is to introduce students to current research paradigms on the covered topics and to identify promising avenues for future research. Moreover, students receive a training on how to present and evaluate papers in seminars and conferences.

    Form of assessment: Participation (20%), Paper presentations and discussions (80%)

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 12.02.24 – 27.05.24 Monday 17:15 – 18:45 O 131
    CDSS Job Talk Series: Next GESS
    0 ECTS
    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: CDSS Job Talk Series
    Course Content

    Johannes Lattmann is the recipient of the 2023 CDSS Young Scholar Award, which he received for his project 'Next GESS – Career Talks for PhD and Master students with Industry, NGOs, and Policy Institutions'.

    For this upcoming semester he organized the “Next GESS” Job Talk Series for doctoral students. Every Thursday, from 16.30 – 17.30 he invites a speaker to talk Online via Zoom about their job and career. The precise schedule can be found in the Syllabus which you can find in the appendix.

    In the context of this series, he has invited speakers from a variety of companies and institutions including IBM, CEPS, OECD, UNESCO and many more. Through their experiences, this series aims to provide insights into exciting career trajectories. Eventually, this series should inform you about career opportunities and provide valuable insights about application processes and the day-to-day work life in different institutions. 

    Each session contains a 15–20 minutes long presentation by the speaker, introducing the respective job or institution. This is followed by a Q&A session in which you can ask questions. 

    Talk schedule

    IS 809: Advanced Data Science Lab II (Text Mining)
    6 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: IS 809
    Credits: 6
    Course Content

    The goal of this lab exercises is to guide students through the typical steps of a scientific data-science project from problem formulation to data acquisition, selection of methods, analysis and presentation / documentation. The focus of this lab will be on analyzing textual data, for example large scale news or social media datasets, using techniques and methods from the domain of natural language processing. The students will present their results and write a paper about their research.

    Learning Goals: Students will be equipped with practical experience with conducting scientific data-science projects. They will train their presentation skills, learn to communicate in research projects and receive feedback.

    Examination: Written elaboration (90%) and presentation (10%)

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 13.02.24 – 28.05.24 Tuesday 13:45 – 17:00 room 314–315 (L 15, 1–6)
    MET 931: Topics in Advanced Sampling Methods: Design and Causal Inference
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: MET 931
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    The reading course is aimed at Ph.D. students in or beyond their second year to support them during their research phase. 1st year PhD students are welcomed to attend the class as well.

    Recommended: Knowledge of basic statistics and prior experience with R or Stata is helpful, but not necessary.

    Course Content

    This reading course provides a hands-on and paper-based approach to understanding and analyzing data. For many projects, collection of new data or experimental designs are the only way to answer a research question or to provide the decisive complementary evidence. Different ways to collect data can have important implications for model estimation and evaluation, parameter inference, and policy conclusions. Standard econometric methods start from assumptions about the sampling procedure and try to cope with the limitations of a given dataset. Instead, we start at the design stage and examine the interplay between sampling and experimental methods, statistical inference and estimation of causal effects. We will use the German Business Panel as point in case and implement cutting-edge methods to gain insights into the causal mechanisms behind reported outcomes. In each session, one of the participants will present a research paper, which we will discuss in light of concrete implementation at trial scale. Participants are encouraged to present research that is valuable for their own thesis or may be assigned to present a topic.

    In addition to presenting a paper and participating in the discussion, students are expected to write a short technical report that summarizes the methods and implications in a way useful for peers who want to use the newly collected data or learn about experimental results.

    Learning outcomes:

    The specific applications cover a broad set of skills with a focus on design of questionnaires and survey experiments, data analysis and quantitative methods, classification, inference, writing of own reports, and opportunities for own research.

    • Analytical Skills/Problem-Solving:
    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 13.02.24 – 28.05.24 Tuesday 10:15 – 11:45 room O 048
    RES (bridge course): Mental health during dissertations: “Research is Me-Search” (GESS doctoral students only)
    5 ECTS
    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: RES (bridge course)
    Credits: 5
    Course Content

    Almost every doctoral dissertation is marked by difficult periods and times of frustration, which can also affect one´s mental health.

    Not only aspects directly related to one's dissertation but also structural and/or personal aspects can make it challenging to maintain one's mental health.

    The aim of this course is to get to know and discuss typical risk factors and challenging constellations doctoral students are likely to face during their dissertations. The course will consist of literature-informed/guided group discussions of several predefined topics addressing common difficulties during dissertation projects. During the first session(s), the group will decide the particular topics of interest for each of the sessions based on a brief literature discussion and their personal interests. Then, based on selected literature provided by the lecturer, the students will discuss these topics both from an academic standpoint and from their individual perspective/experience during their dissertation project. Each session will thus serve as information input and offer room for discussion and exchange. The aim of this format is to foster student's knowledge about mental health during dissertation projects and open up possibilities to reflect one´s own situation and standpoints in a group of peers.

    The course will be taught by Dr. Matthias Volz

    Course  requirements & assessment

    Students need to be willing to read articles, and discuss and articulate their own views on typical challenging situations during dissertation projects in guided group discussions.

    Schedule
    Seminar
    bi-weekly 20.02.24 – 19.03.24 Tuesday 10:15 – 11:45 209 in B6, 30–32
    bi-weekly 09.04.24 – 21.05.24 Tuesday 10:15 – 11:45 209 in B6, 30–32
    RES (Bridge Course): New Perspectives on Economics and Politics
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: RES (Bridge Course)
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    Prerequisites: For each session, students need to have read the respective book in advance. (Detailed schedule will be provided in an introductory session.)

    Form of Assessment: Essay 50 %, Class Participation 50 %


    Friedman, M. (1963). Capitalism and Freedom. University of Chicago Press.
    Deaton, A. (2023). Economics in America: An Immigrant Economist Explores the Land of Inequality. Princeton University Press.
    Sandel, M. J. (2020). The Tyranny of Merit: What’s Become of the Common Good?. Penguin UK.
    Bowles, S. (2016). The moral economy. Yale University Press.
    Formal: Students need to be enrolled a PhD program at the GESS at the University of Mannheim, or the Master of Political Science.
    Required: Willingness to read, discuss, challenge, engage and think for yourself is critical for this course.

    Course Content

    We live in interesting times both, economically and politically. Many observers point to crises and uncertain developments in the economic and political world. Making sense of the nature of these challenges and pointing toward economic and political solutions for the future requires new perspectives. This is a course about the big and bold questions in economics and politics. How can or should economics and politics be organized to best serve society? What does it mean to put humans as they really are at the center of economic and political thinking? What role do morals and values, or dignity and respect, play for the way economics and politics work? What are the implications of digitalization for capitalism and freedom?

    We will try to come to grips with these questions by reading and discussing four key books on various new perspectives at the intersection between economics and politics. The aim of this course is to go as deep as we can and to get as much out of an in-class discussion of the material as possible. Willingness to acquire and read the books is a must. If you are unsure about whether or not you would want to take on the commitment of reading four books in one semester then this course is probably not the right one for you.

    Students need to be willing to read books, form their own opinions on them, and elaborate on and defend their own views in group discussions and a final essay.

    We will meet for an introductory session on Monday 4.3. at 13.45–15.15 and then meet again for a total of seven Thursday and Wednesday sessions after the Easter break: 11.4., 25.4., 2.5., 8.5., 16.5., 23.5., and 29.5. at 8.30–11.45.

    Competences acquired

    Learning outcomes: The aim of this course is to engage in intellectual dialogue, to develop a personal point of view on some of the central economic and political questions we face today, and to allow ourselves to think creatively, freely, and out of the box. After completing this course, students will have read important texts on new perspectives in economics and politics, they will have trained their ability to distill an own point of view from the writings of leading scientists, they will train their writing and discussion skills, and they will train to creatively apply what they have read in writing about the future of economics and politics in our society.

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Introduction to the Course 04.03.24 – 04.03.24 Monday 13:45 – 15:15 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 11.04.24 – 11.04.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 25.04.24 – 25.04.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 02.05.24 – 02.05.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 08.05.24 – 08.05.24 Wednesday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 16.05.24 – 16.05.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 B6, 23–25, Room A301
    Lecture 23.05.24 – 23.05.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 29.05.24 – 29.05.24 Wednesday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
  • Management

    MAN 801: Advances in Entrepreneurship and Management Research
    6 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: core course
    Course Number: MAN 801
    Credits: 6
    Prerequisites

    Skills: Intermediate level of quantitative/econometric analysis

    Formal: Regular attendance is expected.

    Recommended: An interest in conducting an experimental study which is connected to the PhD project.

    Course Content

    In this Ph.D. course, we will focus on experiments as important tool to examine advanced and hot topics in entrepreneurship and management research. We will learn about the different types of experiments and their relevance to test main scientific theories and evaluate practical interventions, as well as their requirements and pitfalls. Additionally, we will discuss how to design and implement your own experiments, conduct basic power analyses to determine the minimum sample size to determine an existing effect, and practice how to analyze the experimental results empirically. Finally, we go through the ethical aspects of running experiments, look at the requirements of an application for approval at the Ethics Commission of the University of Mannheim, and learn about the importance and mechanics of preregistering your experimental study.

    The course will be taught by Prof. Woywode and Dr. Christoph Sajons

    Learning outcomes: The course aims at enabling students to understand, design, and conduct experimental studies in the context of entrepreneurship and management research. Students will work on and implement their own experimental study and write up its results in a short paper that could be the foundation of a part of their PhD thesis.

    Form of assessment: In-class exam 25%, presentation 15%, term paper (experimental study) 60 %

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 08.03.24 Friday 11:00 – 16:00 010 Seminarraum (L 9, 5)
    Lecture 12.04.24 Friday 11:00 – 16:00 O 129 Göhringer Hörsaal (Schloss Ostflügel)
    Lecture 17.05.24 Friday 11:00 – 16:00 O 048 Seminarraum (Schloss Ostflügel)
    Lecture 14.06.24 Friday 11:00 – 16:00 O 048
    Lecture 30.08.24 Friday 11:00 – 16:00 tba
    MAN 804: Advances in Strategic Management
    6 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: core course
    Course Number: MAN 804
    Credits: 6
    Course Content

    The seminar serves the purpose of familiarizing students with the most relevant theoretical perspectives applied in strategic management research. Besides a review of the current state-of-the-art, we will engage in a discussion about the most prevalent theoretical lenses, their origin, core assumptions and conceptual strengths and weaknesses.

    Learning outcomes:

    • Develop an advanced understanding of the most established theories applied in strategic management research
    • Learn how to develop a sound theoretical reasoning in the front-end of empirical management studies
    • Understand what it means to build a substantial theoretical contribution

    Form of assessment: Essay 50%, presentation 50%

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 20.02.24 – 20.02.24 Tuesday 10:00 – 12:00 EO 256
    Lecture 02.05.24 – 02.05.24 Thursday 09:00 – 18:00 EO 237
    Lecture 03.05.24 – 03.05.24 Friday 09:00 – 18:00 EO 237
    MAN 910: Area Seminar Management
    ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: core course
    Course Number: MAN 910
    Course Content

    The course focuses on current research topics in the field of management. Visiting researchers present their latest working papers and discuss their ideas with participating faculty and students. The course introduces students to the variety of research methods that are currently popular in empirical and theoretical research.

    Learning outcomes: Students will learn to follow-up with and discuss about current research topics in management. The interaction with leading researchers will allow them to develop own research ideas and get insights into the design, execution and presentation of research projects.

    Examination: Oral Participation

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 06.03.24 – 05.06.24 Wednesday 13:45 – 15:15 EO 256
    Lecture
    Lecture 21.02.24 – 21.02.24 Wednesday 13:45 – 15:15 L9, 1–2, room 001
    Lecture 08.05.24 – 08.05.24 Wednesday 13:45 – 15:15 O 226–28
    MET: Replication Studies
    5 ECTS
    Course Type: elective course
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    Formal: Prior course registration is required, and regular attendance is expected.

    Recommended: An interest in conducting a replication study which is connected to the PhD project.

    Audit only is not possible.

    Course Content

    Responsible Teacher: Prof. Dr. Dirk Ifenthaler

    Content: Foundation and design of replication studies, reporting replication studies for systematic impact on practice

    Form of assessmant: Presentation 30%; Written Essay 70%

    Competences acquired

    Replication studies add confidence in findings and are necessary to generate a basis for generalisation beyond an original research project. Furthermore, replication studies may identify potential biases in the original study as well as serve as a foundation for confirming or disconfirming prior findings. Students differentiate types for designing replication studies, identify replication studies in their field of PhD, as well as develop a design for conducting a replication study and critically reflect the limitations.

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 14.02.24 – 29.05.24 Wednesday 10:15 – 11:45 SO 322
    RES (Bridge Course): Financial Economics of Climate and Sustainability
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    Pre-requisites and finance context: The course will assume that participants have a background in core graduate-level finance. The course will cover topics from a variety of subfields in finance (asset pricing, financial intermediation, household finance, corporate finance). The introductory block of three classes is intended to orient students to the science of climate change as well as to refresh key concepts from economics and finance; the remaining classes will dive into detail on current research in different subfield. We will conclude with a discussion of open topics in this field. We expect that the course will be useful to doctoral students in finance, economics, and accounting. As a global class, we will be on Zoom.

    Course Content

    The purpose of the course is to (a) introduce graduate students to questions and methods in the rapidly evolving fields of climate/sustainable finance; (b) connect researchers from across the globe interested in this topic to stimulate more rigorous, relevant, and collaborative work. Addressing climate change demands changes in natural, social, and economic systems and will require greater collaboration. In that spirit, this course is being offered by a team of professors from different schools and universities across the globe. Each instructor will deliver one or more lectures and there will be students from a number of different schools.

    Our teaching group consists of current and former AFA and EFA presidents and some of the leading climate finance scholars, including Laura Starks (current AFA President), Patrick Bolton (former AFA President), Stefano Giglio, Marcin Kacperczyk (former EFA President), Caroline Flammer, Geoff Heal, Stefan Reichelstein, Johannes Stroebel, Ben Caldecott and Peter Tufano.

    Course Requirement: Beyond weekly preparation and participation, students will be expected to write a paper either laying out a potential research topic or synthesizing a set of related papers that were not discussed in class. Papers should not exceed eight pages, plus applicable tables and exhibits.

    Schedule
    Lecture
    30.01.24 – 23.04.24 Tuesday 17:00 – 19:00 Zoom
    This session is in person! 20.02.24 Tuesday 16:00 – 17:00 SO 318
    ACC 922: Decarbonization Seminar
    3 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: ACC 922
    Credits: 3
    Course Content

    This course is aimed at doctoral students at GESS. The seminar hosts speakers from academia and industry to discuss latest advances and challenges associated with the transition towards a decarbonized energy economy. Topics covered include the economics and management of sustainability activities and clean energy technologies across all sectors of the economy with a particular focus on the energy sector, transportation services, and carbon-free manufacturing processes.

    Course participants need to attend the seminar talks and the corresponding preparation sessions. In the preparation sessions, students are asked to present a paper and take the role of a discussant. Readings may additionally include recent theory or empirical papers.

    Learning outcomes: The primary objective of the course is to introduce students to current research paradigms on the covered topics and to identify promising avenues for future research. Moreover, students receive a training on how to present and evaluate papers in seminars and conferences.

    Form of assessment: Participation (20%), Paper presentations and discussions (80%)

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 12.02.24 – 27.05.24 Monday 17:15 – 18:45 O 131
    CDSS Job Talk Series: Next GESS
    0 ECTS
    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: CDSS Job Talk Series
    Course Content

    Johannes Lattmann is the recipient of the 2023 CDSS Young Scholar Award, which he received for his project 'Next GESS – Career Talks for PhD and Master students with Industry, NGOs, and Policy Institutions'.

    For this upcoming semester he organized the “Next GESS” Job Talk Series for doctoral students. Every Thursday, from 16.30 – 17.30 he invites a speaker to talk Online via Zoom about their job and career. The precise schedule can be found in the Syllabus which you can find in the appendix.

    In the context of this series, he has invited speakers from a variety of companies and institutions including IBM, CEPS, OECD, UNESCO and many more. Through their experiences, this series aims to provide insights into exciting career trajectories. Eventually, this series should inform you about career opportunities and provide valuable insights about application processes and the day-to-day work life in different institutions. 

    Each session contains a 15–20 minutes long presentation by the speaker, introducing the respective job or institution. This is followed by a Q&A session in which you can ask questions. 

    Talk schedule

    IS 809: Advanced Data Science Lab II (Text Mining)
    6 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: IS 809
    Credits: 6
    Course Content

    The goal of this lab exercises is to guide students through the typical steps of a scientific data-science project from problem formulation to data acquisition, selection of methods, analysis and presentation / documentation. The focus of this lab will be on analyzing textual data, for example large scale news or social media datasets, using techniques and methods from the domain of natural language processing. The students will present their results and write a paper about their research.

    Learning Goals: Students will be equipped with practical experience with conducting scientific data-science projects. They will train their presentation skills, learn to communicate in research projects and receive feedback.

    Examination: Written elaboration (90%) and presentation (10%)

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 13.02.24 – 28.05.24 Tuesday 13:45 – 17:00 room 314–315 (L 15, 1–6)
    MET 931: Topics in Advanced Sampling Methods: Design and Causal Inference
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: MET 931
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    The reading course is aimed at Ph.D. students in or beyond their second year to support them during their research phase. 1st year PhD students are welcomed to attend the class as well.

    Recommended: Knowledge of basic statistics and prior experience with R or Stata is helpful, but not necessary.

    Course Content

    This reading course provides a hands-on and paper-based approach to understanding and analyzing data. For many projects, collection of new data or experimental designs are the only way to answer a research question or to provide the decisive complementary evidence. Different ways to collect data can have important implications for model estimation and evaluation, parameter inference, and policy conclusions. Standard econometric methods start from assumptions about the sampling procedure and try to cope with the limitations of a given dataset. Instead, we start at the design stage and examine the interplay between sampling and experimental methods, statistical inference and estimation of causal effects. We will use the German Business Panel as point in case and implement cutting-edge methods to gain insights into the causal mechanisms behind reported outcomes. In each session, one of the participants will present a research paper, which we will discuss in light of concrete implementation at trial scale. Participants are encouraged to present research that is valuable for their own thesis or may be assigned to present a topic.

    In addition to presenting a paper and participating in the discussion, students are expected to write a short technical report that summarizes the methods and implications in a way useful for peers who want to use the newly collected data or learn about experimental results.

    Learning outcomes:

    The specific applications cover a broad set of skills with a focus on design of questionnaires and survey experiments, data analysis and quantitative methods, classification, inference, writing of own reports, and opportunities for own research.

    • Analytical Skills/Problem-Solving:
    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 13.02.24 – 28.05.24 Tuesday 10:15 – 11:45 room O 048
    RES (bridge course): Mental health during dissertations: “Research is Me-Search” (GESS doctoral students only)
    5 ECTS
    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: RES (bridge course)
    Credits: 5
    Course Content

    Almost every doctoral dissertation is marked by difficult periods and times of frustration, which can also affect one´s mental health.

    Not only aspects directly related to one's dissertation but also structural and/or personal aspects can make it challenging to maintain one's mental health.

    The aim of this course is to get to know and discuss typical risk factors and challenging constellations doctoral students are likely to face during their dissertations. The course will consist of literature-informed/guided group discussions of several predefined topics addressing common difficulties during dissertation projects. During the first session(s), the group will decide the particular topics of interest for each of the sessions based on a brief literature discussion and their personal interests. Then, based on selected literature provided by the lecturer, the students will discuss these topics both from an academic standpoint and from their individual perspective/experience during their dissertation project. Each session will thus serve as information input and offer room for discussion and exchange. The aim of this format is to foster student's knowledge about mental health during dissertation projects and open up possibilities to reflect one´s own situation and standpoints in a group of peers.

    The course will be taught by Dr. Matthias Volz

    Course  requirements & assessment

    Students need to be willing to read articles, and discuss and articulate their own views on typical challenging situations during dissertation projects in guided group discussions.

    Schedule
    Seminar
    bi-weekly 20.02.24 – 19.03.24 Tuesday 10:15 – 11:45 209 in B6, 30–32
    bi-weekly 09.04.24 – 21.05.24 Tuesday 10:15 – 11:45 209 in B6, 30–32
    RES (Bridge Course): New Perspectives on Economics and Politics
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: RES (Bridge Course)
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    Prerequisites: For each session, students need to have read the respective book in advance. (Detailed schedule will be provided in an introductory session.)

    Form of Assessment: Essay 50 %, Class Participation 50 %


    Friedman, M. (1963). Capitalism and Freedom. University of Chicago Press.
    Deaton, A. (2023). Economics in America: An Immigrant Economist Explores the Land of Inequality. Princeton University Press.
    Sandel, M. J. (2020). The Tyranny of Merit: What’s Become of the Common Good?. Penguin UK.
    Bowles, S. (2016). The moral economy. Yale University Press.
    Formal: Students need to be enrolled a PhD program at the GESS at the University of Mannheim, or the Master of Political Science.
    Required: Willingness to read, discuss, challenge, engage and think for yourself is critical for this course.

    Course Content

    We live in interesting times both, economically and politically. Many observers point to crises and uncertain developments in the economic and political world. Making sense of the nature of these challenges and pointing toward economic and political solutions for the future requires new perspectives. This is a course about the big and bold questions in economics and politics. How can or should economics and politics be organized to best serve society? What does it mean to put humans as they really are at the center of economic and political thinking? What role do morals and values, or dignity and respect, play for the way economics and politics work? What are the implications of digitalization for capitalism and freedom?

    We will try to come to grips with these questions by reading and discussing four key books on various new perspectives at the intersection between economics and politics. The aim of this course is to go as deep as we can and to get as much out of an in-class discussion of the material as possible. Willingness to acquire and read the books is a must. If you are unsure about whether or not you would want to take on the commitment of reading four books in one semester then this course is probably not the right one for you.

    Students need to be willing to read books, form their own opinions on them, and elaborate on and defend their own views in group discussions and a final essay.

    We will meet for an introductory session on Monday 4.3. at 13.45–15.15 and then meet again for a total of seven Thursday and Wednesday sessions after the Easter break: 11.4., 25.4., 2.5., 8.5., 16.5., 23.5., and 29.5. at 8.30–11.45.

    Competences acquired

    Learning outcomes: The aim of this course is to engage in intellectual dialogue, to develop a personal point of view on some of the central economic and political questions we face today, and to allow ourselves to think creatively, freely, and out of the box. After completing this course, students will have read important texts on new perspectives in economics and politics, they will have trained their ability to distill an own point of view from the writings of leading scientists, they will train their writing and discussion skills, and they will train to creatively apply what they have read in writing about the future of economics and politics in our society.

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Introduction to the Course 04.03.24 – 04.03.24 Monday 13:45 – 15:15 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 11.04.24 – 11.04.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 25.04.24 – 25.04.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 02.05.24 – 02.05.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 08.05.24 – 08.05.24 Wednesday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 16.05.24 – 16.05.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 B6, 23–25, Room A301
    Lecture 23.05.24 – 23.05.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 29.05.24 – 29.05.24 Wednesday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
  • Marketing

    MKT 804: Theory Development and Model Building
    6 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: core course
    Course Number: MKT 804
    Credits: 6
    Course Content

    This course teaches students how to develop and test theories in an applied and concrete way. We discuss and study a range of research approaches and methods, including structural equation modeling. This course provides students with an opportunity to develop and fine-tune appropriate and specific theories for their own research.
    Students come up and choose a specific topic of their interest at the beginning of the class and develop and present a theoretical framework suitable for their project. Another key learning outcome is to enhance students’ ability to conduct sound academic research and help them to derive hypotheses for their own research projects.

    Learning goals:

    • Learn how to generate ideas, define concepts, and clarify relationships between concepts.
    • Explore the process of theory construction and theory testing using the structural equation modeling (SEM) framework.
    • Identify and explore substantive theoretical contributions to the marketing strategy literature.
    • Exercise and extend analytical skills in order to conduct sound academic research

    Form of assessment: Project (40%), presentation (60%)

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 20.03.24 – 10.04.24 Wednesday 13:45 – 15:15 room 009 (Roche Forum, L 5,1)
    Lecture 17.04.24 – 08.05.24 Wednesday 13:45 – 17:00 room 009 (Roche Forum, L 5, 1)
    MKT 901: Designing Marketing Research Projects
    6 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: core course
    Course Number: MKT 901
    Credits: 6
    Course Content

    In this course, students will develop their own marketing research projects (e.g., as parts of their own dissertation projects). In presentation sessions, students will present their research project to all participants of the class and to the instructor. Discussions among partici­pants as well as the instructor’s feedback aim at strengthening and refining the positioning and the contribution of the individual projects. Students in the first year of their Ph.D. studies can thus use this course to get important insights for the preparation and refinement of their disser­ta­tion proposal.

    At the beginning of the course, objectives, general guidelines, and best practices for developing impactful research projects will be provided in a kick-off meeting. Furthermore, best practices how to get published in leading journals will be discussed. Then, students will start developing their projects. Students are not limited with respect to the choice of their individual research topic; however, it is made in accordance with the instructor.

    Students will prepare the project by developing a presentation containing the positioning and research questions, a brief literature review, the theoretical foundations and research hypotheses, as well as an outlook on potential methodological approaches (such as obtaining and analyzing adequate data). Students will present their research projects. Based on the course participants’ and the instructor’s feedback, students can update and refine their research projects.

    Learning outcomes:

    • Development of own marketing research project
    • presentation of own marketing research project
    • providing feedback on marketing research projects

    This course aims at preparing students to formulate their own marketing research problems (e.g., as parts of their dissertation projects), to shape their contribution with respect to the existing literature, and to identify the necessary data and methods to conduct their research projects. As benchmark for the students’ research projects, the actual standards with respect to innovative­ness, relevance, and rigor of the leading international marketing journals will be applied. Furthermore, implications for practice have to be considered.

    Form of assessment: Essay (60%), presentation (40%)

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 05.03.24 – 05.03.24 Tuesday 10:00 – 13:00 room 009 (Roche Forum, L 5, 1)
    Lecture 13.05.24 – 13.05.24 Monday 10:00 – 14:00 room 009 (Roche Forum, L 5, 1)
    Lecture 14.05.24 – 14.05.24 Tuesday 10:00 – 14:00 room 009 (Roche Forum, L 5, 1)
    MKT 910: Area Seminar Marketing
    ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: core course
    Course Number: MKT 910
    Course Content

    The course focuses on current research topics in the field of marketing. Visiting researchers present their latest working papers and discuss their ideas with participating faculty and students. The presentations have workshop format and are similar in style to leading scientific conferences. The course introduces students to the variety of research methods that are currently popular in empirical and theoretical research.

    Seminar Dates are announced here.

    MET: Replication Studies
    5 ECTS
    Course Type: elective course
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    Formal: Prior course registration is required, and regular attendance is expected.

    Recommended: An interest in conducting a replication study which is connected to the PhD project.

    Audit only is not possible.

    Course Content

    Responsible Teacher: Prof. Dr. Dirk Ifenthaler

    Content: Foundation and design of replication studies, reporting replication studies for systematic impact on practice

    Form of assessmant: Presentation 30%; Written Essay 70%

    Competences acquired

    Replication studies add confidence in findings and are necessary to generate a basis for generalisation beyond an original research project. Furthermore, replication studies may identify potential biases in the original study as well as serve as a foundation for confirming or disconfirming prior findings. Students differentiate types for designing replication studies, identify replication studies in their field of PhD, as well as develop a design for conducting a replication study and critically reflect the limitations.

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 14.02.24 – 29.05.24 Wednesday 10:15 – 11:45 SO 322
    RES (Bridge Course): Financial Economics of Climate and Sustainability
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    Pre-requisites and finance context: The course will assume that participants have a background in core graduate-level finance. The course will cover topics from a variety of subfields in finance (asset pricing, financial intermediation, household finance, corporate finance). The introductory block of three classes is intended to orient students to the science of climate change as well as to refresh key concepts from economics and finance; the remaining classes will dive into detail on current research in different subfield. We will conclude with a discussion of open topics in this field. We expect that the course will be useful to doctoral students in finance, economics, and accounting. As a global class, we will be on Zoom.

    Course Content

    The purpose of the course is to (a) introduce graduate students to questions and methods in the rapidly evolving fields of climate/sustainable finance; (b) connect researchers from across the globe interested in this topic to stimulate more rigorous, relevant, and collaborative work. Addressing climate change demands changes in natural, social, and economic systems and will require greater collaboration. In that spirit, this course is being offered by a team of professors from different schools and universities across the globe. Each instructor will deliver one or more lectures and there will be students from a number of different schools.

    Our teaching group consists of current and former AFA and EFA presidents and some of the leading climate finance scholars, including Laura Starks (current AFA President), Patrick Bolton (former AFA President), Stefano Giglio, Marcin Kacperczyk (former EFA President), Caroline Flammer, Geoff Heal, Stefan Reichelstein, Johannes Stroebel, Ben Caldecott and Peter Tufano.

    Course Requirement: Beyond weekly preparation and participation, students will be expected to write a paper either laying out a potential research topic or synthesizing a set of related papers that were not discussed in class. Papers should not exceed eight pages, plus applicable tables and exhibits.

    Schedule
    Lecture
    30.01.24 – 23.04.24 Tuesday 17:00 – 19:00 Zoom
    This session is in person! 20.02.24 Tuesday 16:00 – 17:00 SO 318
    ACC 922: Decarbonization Seminar
    3 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: ACC 922
    Credits: 3
    Course Content

    This course is aimed at doctoral students at GESS. The seminar hosts speakers from academia and industry to discuss latest advances and challenges associated with the transition towards a decarbonized energy economy. Topics covered include the economics and management of sustainability activities and clean energy technologies across all sectors of the economy with a particular focus on the energy sector, transportation services, and carbon-free manufacturing processes.

    Course participants need to attend the seminar talks and the corresponding preparation sessions. In the preparation sessions, students are asked to present a paper and take the role of a discussant. Readings may additionally include recent theory or empirical papers.

    Learning outcomes: The primary objective of the course is to introduce students to current research paradigms on the covered topics and to identify promising avenues for future research. Moreover, students receive a training on how to present and evaluate papers in seminars and conferences.

    Form of assessment: Participation (20%), Paper presentations and discussions (80%)

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 12.02.24 – 27.05.24 Monday 17:15 – 18:45 O 131
    CDSS Job Talk Series: Next GESS
    0 ECTS
    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: CDSS Job Talk Series
    Course Content

    Johannes Lattmann is the recipient of the 2023 CDSS Young Scholar Award, which he received for his project 'Next GESS – Career Talks for PhD and Master students with Industry, NGOs, and Policy Institutions'.

    For this upcoming semester he organized the “Next GESS” Job Talk Series for doctoral students. Every Thursday, from 16.30 – 17.30 he invites a speaker to talk Online via Zoom about their job and career. The precise schedule can be found in the Syllabus which you can find in the appendix.

    In the context of this series, he has invited speakers from a variety of companies and institutions including IBM, CEPS, OECD, UNESCO and many more. Through their experiences, this series aims to provide insights into exciting career trajectories. Eventually, this series should inform you about career opportunities and provide valuable insights about application processes and the day-to-day work life in different institutions. 

    Each session contains a 15–20 minutes long presentation by the speaker, introducing the respective job or institution. This is followed by a Q&A session in which you can ask questions. 

    Talk schedule

    IS 809: Advanced Data Science Lab II (Text Mining)
    6 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: IS 809
    Credits: 6
    Course Content

    The goal of this lab exercises is to guide students through the typical steps of a scientific data-science project from problem formulation to data acquisition, selection of methods, analysis and presentation / documentation. The focus of this lab will be on analyzing textual data, for example large scale news or social media datasets, using techniques and methods from the domain of natural language processing. The students will present their results and write a paper about their research.

    Learning Goals: Students will be equipped with practical experience with conducting scientific data-science projects. They will train their presentation skills, learn to communicate in research projects and receive feedback.

    Examination: Written elaboration (90%) and presentation (10%)

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 13.02.24 – 28.05.24 Tuesday 13:45 – 17:00 room 314–315 (L 15, 1–6)
    MET 931: Topics in Advanced Sampling Methods: Design and Causal Inference
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: MET 931
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    The reading course is aimed at Ph.D. students in or beyond their second year to support them during their research phase. 1st year PhD students are welcomed to attend the class as well.

    Recommended: Knowledge of basic statistics and prior experience with R or Stata is helpful, but not necessary.

    Course Content

    This reading course provides a hands-on and paper-based approach to understanding and analyzing data. For many projects, collection of new data or experimental designs are the only way to answer a research question or to provide the decisive complementary evidence. Different ways to collect data can have important implications for model estimation and evaluation, parameter inference, and policy conclusions. Standard econometric methods start from assumptions about the sampling procedure and try to cope with the limitations of a given dataset. Instead, we start at the design stage and examine the interplay between sampling and experimental methods, statistical inference and estimation of causal effects. We will use the German Business Panel as point in case and implement cutting-edge methods to gain insights into the causal mechanisms behind reported outcomes. In each session, one of the participants will present a research paper, which we will discuss in light of concrete implementation at trial scale. Participants are encouraged to present research that is valuable for their own thesis or may be assigned to present a topic.

    In addition to presenting a paper and participating in the discussion, students are expected to write a short technical report that summarizes the methods and implications in a way useful for peers who want to use the newly collected data or learn about experimental results.

    Learning outcomes:

    The specific applications cover a broad set of skills with a focus on design of questionnaires and survey experiments, data analysis and quantitative methods, classification, inference, writing of own reports, and opportunities for own research.

    • Analytical Skills/Problem-Solving:
    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 13.02.24 – 28.05.24 Tuesday 10:15 – 11:45 room O 048
    MKT 902: Advances in Marketing Research
    6 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: MKT 902
    Credits: 6
    Prerequisites

    Formal: MKT 801 Fundamentals of Marketing Research

    Course Content

    The primary goal of Advances in Marketing Research is to help students prepare to conduct research which is publishable in the leading research journals in their respective disciplines.  Hence, the feedback students receive will be consistent with that dispensed by the reviewers and editors of the most prestigious research journals in business (i.e., highly critical).  Even when a manuscript is accepted for publication at a leading journal, the authors typically receive mostly negative comments on their work.  It is important that students not take criticism of their research personally.  To do so would be extremely ego deflating and would interfere with their subsequent performance on other assignments.  Moreover, students need to develop the ability to accept and use criticism to be able to survive in the academic publishing world.

    Learning outcomes: Advances in Marketing Research is designed to assist doctoral candidates in acquiring a deeper understanding of the research process and a knowledge of the research tools which they will need to design and execute scientific research on behavioral and organizational issues in marketing.  An effort is made to help the students develop research judgment as well as research skills so that they will be better able to assess when a proposed piece of research is likely to be fruitful and when it is not.

    Form of assessment: Essay: 50%, presentation: 30%, discussion and simulation/statistical analysis: 20%

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 16.02.24 – 31.05.24 Friday 15:30 – 17:00 room 107 (L 5, 2)
    RES (bridge course): Mental health during dissertations: “Research is Me-Search” (GESS doctoral students only)
    5 ECTS
    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: RES (bridge course)
    Credits: 5
    Course Content

    Almost every doctoral dissertation is marked by difficult periods and times of frustration, which can also affect one´s mental health.

    Not only aspects directly related to one's dissertation but also structural and/or personal aspects can make it challenging to maintain one's mental health.

    The aim of this course is to get to know and discuss typical risk factors and challenging constellations doctoral students are likely to face during their dissertations. The course will consist of literature-informed/guided group discussions of several predefined topics addressing common difficulties during dissertation projects. During the first session(s), the group will decide the particular topics of interest for each of the sessions based on a brief literature discussion and their personal interests. Then, based on selected literature provided by the lecturer, the students will discuss these topics both from an academic standpoint and from their individual perspective/experience during their dissertation project. Each session will thus serve as information input and offer room for discussion and exchange. The aim of this format is to foster student's knowledge about mental health during dissertation projects and open up possibilities to reflect one´s own situation and standpoints in a group of peers.

    The course will be taught by Dr. Matthias Volz

    Course  requirements & assessment

    Students need to be willing to read articles, and discuss and articulate their own views on typical challenging situations during dissertation projects in guided group discussions.

    Schedule
    Seminar
    bi-weekly 20.02.24 – 19.03.24 Tuesday 10:15 – 11:45 209 in B6, 30–32
    bi-weekly 09.04.24 – 21.05.24 Tuesday 10:15 – 11:45 209 in B6, 30–32
    RES (Bridge Course): New Perspectives on Economics and Politics
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: RES (Bridge Course)
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    Prerequisites: For each session, students need to have read the respective book in advance. (Detailed schedule will be provided in an introductory session.)

    Form of Assessment: Essay 50 %, Class Participation 50 %


    Friedman, M. (1963). Capitalism and Freedom. University of Chicago Press.
    Deaton, A. (2023). Economics in America: An Immigrant Economist Explores the Land of Inequality. Princeton University Press.
    Sandel, M. J. (2020). The Tyranny of Merit: What’s Become of the Common Good?. Penguin UK.
    Bowles, S. (2016). The moral economy. Yale University Press.
    Formal: Students need to be enrolled a PhD program at the GESS at the University of Mannheim, or the Master of Political Science.
    Required: Willingness to read, discuss, challenge, engage and think for yourself is critical for this course.

    Course Content

    We live in interesting times both, economically and politically. Many observers point to crises and uncertain developments in the economic and political world. Making sense of the nature of these challenges and pointing toward economic and political solutions for the future requires new perspectives. This is a course about the big and bold questions in economics and politics. How can or should economics and politics be organized to best serve society? What does it mean to put humans as they really are at the center of economic and political thinking? What role do morals and values, or dignity and respect, play for the way economics and politics work? What are the implications of digitalization for capitalism and freedom?

    We will try to come to grips with these questions by reading and discussing four key books on various new perspectives at the intersection between economics and politics. The aim of this course is to go as deep as we can and to get as much out of an in-class discussion of the material as possible. Willingness to acquire and read the books is a must. If you are unsure about whether or not you would want to take on the commitment of reading four books in one semester then this course is probably not the right one for you.

    Students need to be willing to read books, form their own opinions on them, and elaborate on and defend their own views in group discussions and a final essay.

    We will meet for an introductory session on Monday 4.3. at 13.45–15.15 and then meet again for a total of seven Thursday and Wednesday sessions after the Easter break: 11.4., 25.4., 2.5., 8.5., 16.5., 23.5., and 29.5. at 8.30–11.45.

    Competences acquired

    Learning outcomes: The aim of this course is to engage in intellectual dialogue, to develop a personal point of view on some of the central economic and political questions we face today, and to allow ourselves to think creatively, freely, and out of the box. After completing this course, students will have read important texts on new perspectives in economics and politics, they will have trained their ability to distill an own point of view from the writings of leading scientists, they will train their writing and discussion skills, and they will train to creatively apply what they have read in writing about the future of economics and politics in our society.

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Introduction to the Course 04.03.24 – 04.03.24 Monday 13:45 – 15:15 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 11.04.24 – 11.04.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 25.04.24 – 25.04.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 02.05.24 – 02.05.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 08.05.24 – 08.05.24 Wednesday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 16.05.24 – 16.05.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 B6, 23–25, Room A301
    Lecture 23.05.24 – 23.05.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 29.05.24 – 29.05.24 Wednesday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
  • Operations Management

    IS / OPM 910: Area Seminar Information Systems and Operations Management
    ECTS
    Course Type: core course
    Course Number: IS / OPM 910
    Course Content

    The course focuses on current research topics in the field of information systems and operations management. Visiting researchers present their latest working papers and discuss their ideas with participating faculty and students. The course introduces students to the variety of research methods that are currently popular in empirical and theoretical research.

    Competences acquired

    Students will learn to follow-up with and discuss about current research topics in information systems and operations management. The interaction with leading researchers will allow them to develop own research ideas and get insights into the design, execution and presentation of research projects.

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 14.02.24 – 29.05.24 Wednesday 12:00 – 13:30 O 148
    OPM 806: Empirical Research in Operations Management
    8 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: core course
    Course Number: OPM 806
    Credits: 8
    Prerequisites

    Recommended: Fundamentals of statistics

    Course Content

    A large part of research in operations management focusses on modeling and solving practical problems. In contrast to this “OR approach”, the objective of empirical research is to collect data about practical phenomena in order to describe, explain, or predict how those phenomena work. This module provides an overview of (mainly quantitative) empirical research approaches to investigate research questions in operations management and related fields. The focus in not on the comprehensive treatment of empirical research methods, but on how to proceed from having a basic research question to an appropriate research design and methodology. Hence, special emphasis will be placed on the importance of understanding the contingent relationship between the nature of the research question and the research design used to answer it. Topics covered include quantitative vs. qualitative empirical research, framing of research questions, engaging theory and grounding of hypotheses, measurement and operationalization, sampling, model specification, and mainstream research designs and methodologies. This will enable students to critically evaluate the quality of the majority of empirical research in operations management and to design convincing research of their own.

    The course will be taught using an interactive seminar style and is based on the discussion of a selection of papers.

    Learning outcomes: At the end of this course, students have gained the competence to initiate, design, implement, and evaluate empirical research in the social sciences as applied to operations management.

    Form of assessment: Oral exam (30 minutes) 60%, presentation 40%

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 10.05.24 – 31.05.24 Friday 08:30 – 13:30 SO 318
    Lecture 24.05.24 – 24.05.24 Friday 08:30 – 13:30 EO 256
    MET: Replication Studies
    5 ECTS
    Course Type: elective course
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    Formal: Prior course registration is required, and regular attendance is expected.

    Recommended: An interest in conducting a replication study which is connected to the PhD project.

    Audit only is not possible.

    Course Content

    Responsible Teacher: Prof. Dr. Dirk Ifenthaler

    Content: Foundation and design of replication studies, reporting replication studies for systematic impact on practice

    Form of assessmant: Presentation 30%; Written Essay 70%

    Competences acquired

    Replication studies add confidence in findings and are necessary to generate a basis for generalisation beyond an original research project. Furthermore, replication studies may identify potential biases in the original study as well as serve as a foundation for confirming or disconfirming prior findings. Students differentiate types for designing replication studies, identify replication studies in their field of PhD, as well as develop a design for conducting a replication study and critically reflect the limitations.

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 14.02.24 – 29.05.24 Wednesday 10:15 – 11:45 SO 322
    RES (Bridge Course): Financial Economics of Climate and Sustainability
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    Pre-requisites and finance context: The course will assume that participants have a background in core graduate-level finance. The course will cover topics from a variety of subfields in finance (asset pricing, financial intermediation, household finance, corporate finance). The introductory block of three classes is intended to orient students to the science of climate change as well as to refresh key concepts from economics and finance; the remaining classes will dive into detail on current research in different subfield. We will conclude with a discussion of open topics in this field. We expect that the course will be useful to doctoral students in finance, economics, and accounting. As a global class, we will be on Zoom.

    Course Content

    The purpose of the course is to (a) introduce graduate students to questions and methods in the rapidly evolving fields of climate/sustainable finance; (b) connect researchers from across the globe interested in this topic to stimulate more rigorous, relevant, and collaborative work. Addressing climate change demands changes in natural, social, and economic systems and will require greater collaboration. In that spirit, this course is being offered by a team of professors from different schools and universities across the globe. Each instructor will deliver one or more lectures and there will be students from a number of different schools.

    Our teaching group consists of current and former AFA and EFA presidents and some of the leading climate finance scholars, including Laura Starks (current AFA President), Patrick Bolton (former AFA President), Stefano Giglio, Marcin Kacperczyk (former EFA President), Caroline Flammer, Geoff Heal, Stefan Reichelstein, Johannes Stroebel, Ben Caldecott and Peter Tufano.

    Course Requirement: Beyond weekly preparation and participation, students will be expected to write a paper either laying out a potential research topic or synthesizing a set of related papers that were not discussed in class. Papers should not exceed eight pages, plus applicable tables and exhibits.

    Schedule
    Lecture
    30.01.24 – 23.04.24 Tuesday 17:00 – 19:00 Zoom
    This session is in person! 20.02.24 Tuesday 16:00 – 17:00 SO 318
    ACC 922: Decarbonization Seminar
    3 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: ACC 922
    Credits: 3
    Course Content

    This course is aimed at doctoral students at GESS. The seminar hosts speakers from academia and industry to discuss latest advances and challenges associated with the transition towards a decarbonized energy economy. Topics covered include the economics and management of sustainability activities and clean energy technologies across all sectors of the economy with a particular focus on the energy sector, transportation services, and carbon-free manufacturing processes.

    Course participants need to attend the seminar talks and the corresponding preparation sessions. In the preparation sessions, students are asked to present a paper and take the role of a discussant. Readings may additionally include recent theory or empirical papers.

    Learning outcomes: The primary objective of the course is to introduce students to current research paradigms on the covered topics and to identify promising avenues for future research. Moreover, students receive a training on how to present and evaluate papers in seminars and conferences.

    Form of assessment: Participation (20%), Paper presentations and discussions (80%)

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 12.02.24 – 27.05.24 Monday 17:15 – 18:45 O 131
    CDSS Job Talk Series: Next GESS
    0 ECTS
    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: CDSS Job Talk Series
    Course Content

    Johannes Lattmann is the recipient of the 2023 CDSS Young Scholar Award, which he received for his project 'Next GESS – Career Talks for PhD and Master students with Industry, NGOs, and Policy Institutions'.

    For this upcoming semester he organized the “Next GESS” Job Talk Series for doctoral students. Every Thursday, from 16.30 – 17.30 he invites a speaker to talk Online via Zoom about their job and career. The precise schedule can be found in the Syllabus which you can find in the appendix.

    In the context of this series, he has invited speakers from a variety of companies and institutions including IBM, CEPS, OECD, UNESCO and many more. Through their experiences, this series aims to provide insights into exciting career trajectories. Eventually, this series should inform you about career opportunities and provide valuable insights about application processes and the day-to-day work life in different institutions. 

    Each session contains a 15–20 minutes long presentation by the speaker, introducing the respective job or institution. This is followed by a Q&A session in which you can ask questions. 

    Talk schedule

    IS 809: Advanced Data Science Lab II (Text Mining)
    6 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: IS 809
    Credits: 6
    Course Content

    The goal of this lab exercises is to guide students through the typical steps of a scientific data-science project from problem formulation to data acquisition, selection of methods, analysis and presentation / documentation. The focus of this lab will be on analyzing textual data, for example large scale news or social media datasets, using techniques and methods from the domain of natural language processing. The students will present their results and write a paper about their research.

    Learning Goals: Students will be equipped with practical experience with conducting scientific data-science projects. They will train their presentation skills, learn to communicate in research projects and receive feedback.

    Examination: Written elaboration (90%) and presentation (10%)

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 13.02.24 – 28.05.24 Tuesday 13:45 – 17:00 room 314–315 (L 15, 1–6)
    MET 931: Topics in Advanced Sampling Methods: Design and Causal Inference
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: MET 931
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    The reading course is aimed at Ph.D. students in or beyond their second year to support them during their research phase. 1st year PhD students are welcomed to attend the class as well.

    Recommended: Knowledge of basic statistics and prior experience with R or Stata is helpful, but not necessary.

    Course Content

    This reading course provides a hands-on and paper-based approach to understanding and analyzing data. For many projects, collection of new data or experimental designs are the only way to answer a research question or to provide the decisive complementary evidence. Different ways to collect data can have important implications for model estimation and evaluation, parameter inference, and policy conclusions. Standard econometric methods start from assumptions about the sampling procedure and try to cope with the limitations of a given dataset. Instead, we start at the design stage and examine the interplay between sampling and experimental methods, statistical inference and estimation of causal effects. We will use the German Business Panel as point in case and implement cutting-edge methods to gain insights into the causal mechanisms behind reported outcomes. In each session, one of the participants will present a research paper, which we will discuss in light of concrete implementation at trial scale. Participants are encouraged to present research that is valuable for their own thesis or may be assigned to present a topic.

    In addition to presenting a paper and participating in the discussion, students are expected to write a short technical report that summarizes the methods and implications in a way useful for peers who want to use the newly collected data or learn about experimental results.

    Learning outcomes:

    The specific applications cover a broad set of skills with a focus on design of questionnaires and survey experiments, data analysis and quantitative methods, classification, inference, writing of own reports, and opportunities for own research.

    • Analytical Skills/Problem-Solving:
    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 13.02.24 – 28.05.24 Tuesday 10:15 – 11:45 room O 048
    OPM 802: Dynamic and Stochastic Models in Supply Chain Research
    8 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: OPM 802
    Credits: 8
    Prerequisites

    Recommended: Fundamentals in mathematics and statistics

    Course Content

    The course introduces some fundamental techniques for stochastic modelling and optimization, and it discusses their application in supply chain research. Key topics include:

    • Stochastic processes
    • Markov chains
    • Stochastic dynamic programming
    • Inventory theory
    • Revenue management

    The course is taught in a seminar-style format.

    Learning outcomes: The course aims to introduce the participants to fundamental stochastic modeling techniques. Upon completion of this course, participants should be able (i) to read and understand corresponding academic papers and (ii) to develop and analyze stochastic models for supply chain management issues.

    Form of assessment: Term paper 30%, presentation 70%

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture tba 473943:08 – 473943:08 tba
    RES (bridge course): Mental health during dissertations: “Research is Me-Search” (GESS doctoral students only)
    5 ECTS
    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: RES (bridge course)
    Credits: 5
    Course Content

    Almost every doctoral dissertation is marked by difficult periods and times of frustration, which can also affect one´s mental health.

    Not only aspects directly related to one's dissertation but also structural and/or personal aspects can make it challenging to maintain one's mental health.

    The aim of this course is to get to know and discuss typical risk factors and challenging constellations doctoral students are likely to face during their dissertations. The course will consist of literature-informed/guided group discussions of several predefined topics addressing common difficulties during dissertation projects. During the first session(s), the group will decide the particular topics of interest for each of the sessions based on a brief literature discussion and their personal interests. Then, based on selected literature provided by the lecturer, the students will discuss these topics both from an academic standpoint and from their individual perspective/experience during their dissertation project. Each session will thus serve as information input and offer room for discussion and exchange. The aim of this format is to foster student's knowledge about mental health during dissertation projects and open up possibilities to reflect one´s own situation and standpoints in a group of peers.

    The course will be taught by Dr. Matthias Volz

    Course  requirements & assessment

    Students need to be willing to read articles, and discuss and articulate their own views on typical challenging situations during dissertation projects in guided group discussions.

    Schedule
    Seminar
    bi-weekly 20.02.24 – 19.03.24 Tuesday 10:15 – 11:45 209 in B6, 30–32
    bi-weekly 09.04.24 – 21.05.24 Tuesday 10:15 – 11:45 209 in B6, 30–32
    RES (Bridge Course): New Perspectives on Economics and Politics
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: RES (Bridge Course)
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    Prerequisites: For each session, students need to have read the respective book in advance. (Detailed schedule will be provided in an introductory session.)

    Form of Assessment: Essay 50 %, Class Participation 50 %


    Friedman, M. (1963). Capitalism and Freedom. University of Chicago Press.
    Deaton, A. (2023). Economics in America: An Immigrant Economist Explores the Land of Inequality. Princeton University Press.
    Sandel, M. J. (2020). The Tyranny of Merit: What’s Become of the Common Good?. Penguin UK.
    Bowles, S. (2016). The moral economy. Yale University Press.
    Formal: Students need to be enrolled a PhD program at the GESS at the University of Mannheim, or the Master of Political Science.
    Required: Willingness to read, discuss, challenge, engage and think for yourself is critical for this course.

    Course Content

    We live in interesting times both, economically and politically. Many observers point to crises and uncertain developments in the economic and political world. Making sense of the nature of these challenges and pointing toward economic and political solutions for the future requires new perspectives. This is a course about the big and bold questions in economics and politics. How can or should economics and politics be organized to best serve society? What does it mean to put humans as they really are at the center of economic and political thinking? What role do morals and values, or dignity and respect, play for the way economics and politics work? What are the implications of digitalization for capitalism and freedom?

    We will try to come to grips with these questions by reading and discussing four key books on various new perspectives at the intersection between economics and politics. The aim of this course is to go as deep as we can and to get as much out of an in-class discussion of the material as possible. Willingness to acquire and read the books is a must. If you are unsure about whether or not you would want to take on the commitment of reading four books in one semester then this course is probably not the right one for you.

    Students need to be willing to read books, form their own opinions on them, and elaborate on and defend their own views in group discussions and a final essay.

    We will meet for an introductory session on Monday 4.3. at 13.45–15.15 and then meet again for a total of seven Thursday and Wednesday sessions after the Easter break: 11.4., 25.4., 2.5., 8.5., 16.5., 23.5., and 29.5. at 8.30–11.45.

    Competences acquired

    Learning outcomes: The aim of this course is to engage in intellectual dialogue, to develop a personal point of view on some of the central economic and political questions we face today, and to allow ourselves to think creatively, freely, and out of the box. After completing this course, students will have read important texts on new perspectives in economics and politics, they will have trained their ability to distill an own point of view from the writings of leading scientists, they will train their writing and discussion skills, and they will train to creatively apply what they have read in writing about the future of economics and politics in our society.

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Introduction to the Course 04.03.24 – 04.03.24 Monday 13:45 – 15:15 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 11.04.24 – 11.04.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 25.04.24 – 25.04.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 02.05.24 – 02.05.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 08.05.24 – 08.05.24 Wednesday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 16.05.24 – 16.05.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 B6, 23–25, Room A301
    Lecture 23.05.24 – 23.05.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 29.05.24 – 29.05.24 Wednesday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
  • Taxation

    ACC / TAX 910: Area Seminar Accounting and Taxation
    ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: core course
    Course Number: ACC / TAX 910
    Course Content

    The course focuses on current research topics in the field of accounting and taxation. Visiting researchers present their latest working papers and discuss their ideas with participating faculty and students. The presentations have workshop format and are similar in style to leading scientific conferences. For each presentation, a separate preparation session for the Ph.D. students is offered in advance by rotating faculty. Overall, the course deepens the students’ insights into a variety of research methods that are currently popular in empirical and theoretical research.

    Learning outcomes: Students will learn to follow-up with and discuss about current research topics in accounting and taxation. The interaction with leading researchers will allow them to develop own research ideas and get insights into the design, execution and presentation of research projects.

    Seminar Dates are announced here: https://www.bwl.uni-mannheim.de/en/area-accounting-taxation/research/research-seminar/

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 12.02.24 – 27.05.24 Monday 15:30 – 17:00 room O 048
    Seminar 13.02.24 – 28.05.24 Tuesday 13:45 – 15:15 room SO 318
    ACC / TAX 920: Brown Bag Seminar Empirical Accounting and Taxation
    ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: core course
    Course Number: ACC / TAX 920
    Course Content

    The course is taught in a seminar-style format. Students present their own research ideas at different stages of the project (early ideas, preliminary results, and complete working papers). The presentations involve an interactive discussion between faculty and students about the project’s potential contribution, related literature, research design and interpretation of results.

    Learning outcomes: Students will learn how to present and discuss their own research results in a scientific format. They will become acquainted with acting as a discussant for other topics. Students will gain insights into the assessment of contribution, research design, and interpretation of research papers. The development of these skills is also helpful for writing scientific referee reports.


    Course dates will be announced via email to registered participants.

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 14.02.24 – 29.05.24 Wednesday 13:45 – 17:00 room O 048
    ACC 903: Empirical Accounting Research I (Research Methods)
    6 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: core course
    Course Number: ACC 903
    Credits: 6
    Prerequisites

    -

    Course Content

    This course provides a comprehensive overview of research topics and methods in influential seminal as well as contemporaneous papers in the empirical accounting literature. In particular, we cover after an (1) introduction and a review of some “Accounting Classics”, the literatures on (2) Earnings Management, (3) Valuation (value relevance, earnings response coefficients (ERC)/event studies, accounting-based valuation), (4) Voluntary Disclosure, (5) Mandatory Disclosure, (6) International/-Institutional Accounting and IFRS, and (7) Corporate Narratives. In each session, there is first an overview lecture introducing core methods in the corresponding field, and second a session in which we will jointly discuss in more depth selected empirical methods. Students are expected to prepare all readings and to lead selected class discussions about assigned papers in the second half of each lecture.

    The lectures and student discussions are supplemented by assignments on which bases we discuss topics such as which research fields are currently ‘en vogue’ in the scientific journals, how to ‘stay informed’ and identify potentially relevant regulatory changes, how to know about topics influential researchers are working on, or discuss where students see their individual strength and how they can become competitive researchers in the future.

    Learning outcomes: Students should know about the core issues of existing accounting research and established empirical research methodologies. They should also be able to place current research into the literature and to critically evaluate its relevance and technical rigor, and therefore be able to develop meaningful research ideas to extend current knowledge.

    Form of assessment: Exam (90 minutes) 50 %, paper presentations 50 %

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 13.02.24 – 16.04.24 Tuesday 15:30 – 18:30 tba
    TAX 802: Applied Taxation Research I: Foundations and Core Methods
    6 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: core course
    Course Number: TAX 802
    Credits: 6
    Prerequisites

    Formal: Advanced Econometrics I or Applied Econometrics I

    Course Content
    • Conceptual foundations of business taxation: optimal capital/investment choice of firms in the presence of taxes and the role of equity and debt financing in a world with tax differentials.
    • Core empirical methods that are used in applied empirical business taxation research: potential outcome framework, surveys, difference-in-difference estimation. Class sessions are mostly organized along the methods in the standard tool kit of empirical research. We start off each topic with a brief and easy overview of the method. Afterwards, a student will summarize a paper using the respective method and we will discuss in class. For each method, we identify a set of core papers which use the respective method, present examples of a state-of-the art application and are relevant topic wise. These core papers are summarized and discussed in class. We expect all students to read the core papers that we cover in class.

    Learning Outcomes:

    • Students become acquainted with important topics and methods for causal identification in empirical tax research.
    • Students can identify the most appropriate empirical methods for their own research projects.
    • Students can comprehend state-of-the-art literature and they can critically discuss strengths and weaknesses of recent research papers.

    Form of assessment: Presentation (40%), Essay (40%), Participation in class (20%)

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 14.02.24 – 20.03.24 Wednesday 08:30 – 11:45 SO 133
    Lecture 15.02.24 – 21.03.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 SO 133
    TAX 803: Applied Taxation Research II: Advanced Methods and Own Research Topics
    8 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: core course
    Course Number: TAX 803
    Credits: 8
    Prerequisites

    Formal: Advanced Econometrics I or Applied Econometrics I

    Course Content

    Core empirical methods that are used in applied empirical business taxation research: Regression Discontinuity (RDD), Instrumental Variables (IV), Discrete Choice Models and the Bunching estimator (following up on the methods covered in TAX 802: experiments, surveys, difference-in-difference).

    Class sessions are mostly organized along the methods in the standard tool kit of empirical research. We start off each topic with a brief and easy overview of the method. Afterwards, a student will summarize a paper using the respective method and we will discuss in class. For each method, we identify a set of core papers which use the respective method, present examples of a state-of-the art application and are relevant topic wise. These core papers are summarized and discussed in class. We expect all students to read the core papers that we cover in class.

    Students develop their own research project and carry out all phases of the project, except the actual data work. To this end, students first identify a research question and idea, and pitch their idea in class. Subsequently, students start writing up a paper for their research project, which includes all parts of the paper except the data work.

    Learning outcomes:

    • Students become acquainted with important topics and methods for causal identification in empirical tax research.
    • Students can comprehend state-of-the-art literature and to critically discuss strengths and weaknesses of the recent research on taxation.
    • Students are able to develop their own research ideas and execute all stages of a research project.  

    Form of assessment: Two Presentations (40%), Research Paper (40%), Participation in class (20%)

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 10.04.24 – 29.05.24 Wednesday 08:30 – 11:45 SO 133
    Lecture 11.04.24 – 23.05.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 SO 133
    Lecture 12.04.24 – 31.05.24 Friday 08:30 – 11:45 SO 133
    MET: Replication Studies
    5 ECTS
    Course Type: elective course
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    Formal: Prior course registration is required, and regular attendance is expected.

    Recommended: An interest in conducting a replication study which is connected to the PhD project.

    Audit only is not possible.

    Course Content

    Responsible Teacher: Prof. Dr. Dirk Ifenthaler

    Content: Foundation and design of replication studies, reporting replication studies for systematic impact on practice

    Form of assessmant: Presentation 30%; Written Essay 70%

    Competences acquired

    Replication studies add confidence in findings and are necessary to generate a basis for generalisation beyond an original research project. Furthermore, replication studies may identify potential biases in the original study as well as serve as a foundation for confirming or disconfirming prior findings. Students differentiate types for designing replication studies, identify replication studies in their field of PhD, as well as develop a design for conducting a replication study and critically reflect the limitations.

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 14.02.24 – 29.05.24 Wednesday 10:15 – 11:45 SO 322
    RES (Bridge Course): Financial Economics of Climate and Sustainability
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    Pre-requisites and finance context: The course will assume that participants have a background in core graduate-level finance. The course will cover topics from a variety of subfields in finance (asset pricing, financial intermediation, household finance, corporate finance). The introductory block of three classes is intended to orient students to the science of climate change as well as to refresh key concepts from economics and finance; the remaining classes will dive into detail on current research in different subfield. We will conclude with a discussion of open topics in this field. We expect that the course will be useful to doctoral students in finance, economics, and accounting. As a global class, we will be on Zoom.

    Course Content

    The purpose of the course is to (a) introduce graduate students to questions and methods in the rapidly evolving fields of climate/sustainable finance; (b) connect researchers from across the globe interested in this topic to stimulate more rigorous, relevant, and collaborative work. Addressing climate change demands changes in natural, social, and economic systems and will require greater collaboration. In that spirit, this course is being offered by a team of professors from different schools and universities across the globe. Each instructor will deliver one or more lectures and there will be students from a number of different schools.

    Our teaching group consists of current and former AFA and EFA presidents and some of the leading climate finance scholars, including Laura Starks (current AFA President), Patrick Bolton (former AFA President), Stefano Giglio, Marcin Kacperczyk (former EFA President), Caroline Flammer, Geoff Heal, Stefan Reichelstein, Johannes Stroebel, Ben Caldecott and Peter Tufano.

    Course Requirement: Beyond weekly preparation and participation, students will be expected to write a paper either laying out a potential research topic or synthesizing a set of related papers that were not discussed in class. Papers should not exceed eight pages, plus applicable tables and exhibits.

    Schedule
    Lecture
    30.01.24 – 23.04.24 Tuesday 17:00 – 19:00 Zoom
    This session is in person! 20.02.24 Tuesday 16:00 – 17:00 SO 318
    ACC 922: Decarbonization Seminar
    3 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: ACC 922
    Credits: 3
    Course Content

    This course is aimed at doctoral students at GESS. The seminar hosts speakers from academia and industry to discuss latest advances and challenges associated with the transition towards a decarbonized energy economy. Topics covered include the economics and management of sustainability activities and clean energy technologies across all sectors of the economy with a particular focus on the energy sector, transportation services, and carbon-free manufacturing processes.

    Course participants need to attend the seminar talks and the corresponding preparation sessions. In the preparation sessions, students are asked to present a paper and take the role of a discussant. Readings may additionally include recent theory or empirical papers.

    Learning outcomes: The primary objective of the course is to introduce students to current research paradigms on the covered topics and to identify promising avenues for future research. Moreover, students receive a training on how to present and evaluate papers in seminars and conferences.

    Form of assessment: Participation (20%), Paper presentations and discussions (80%)

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 12.02.24 – 27.05.24 Monday 17:15 – 18:45 O 131
    CDSS Job Talk Series: Next GESS
    0 ECTS
    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: CDSS Job Talk Series
    Course Content

    Johannes Lattmann is the recipient of the 2023 CDSS Young Scholar Award, which he received for his project 'Next GESS – Career Talks for PhD and Master students with Industry, NGOs, and Policy Institutions'.

    For this upcoming semester he organized the “Next GESS” Job Talk Series for doctoral students. Every Thursday, from 16.30 – 17.30 he invites a speaker to talk Online via Zoom about their job and career. The precise schedule can be found in the Syllabus which you can find in the appendix.

    In the context of this series, he has invited speakers from a variety of companies and institutions including IBM, CEPS, OECD, UNESCO and many more. Through their experiences, this series aims to provide insights into exciting career trajectories. Eventually, this series should inform you about career opportunities and provide valuable insights about application processes and the day-to-day work life in different institutions. 

    Each session contains a 15–20 minutes long presentation by the speaker, introducing the respective job or institution. This is followed by a Q&A session in which you can ask questions. 

    Talk schedule

    IS 809: Advanced Data Science Lab II (Text Mining)
    6 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: IS 809
    Credits: 6
    Course Content

    The goal of this lab exercises is to guide students through the typical steps of a scientific data-science project from problem formulation to data acquisition, selection of methods, analysis and presentation / documentation. The focus of this lab will be on analyzing textual data, for example large scale news or social media datasets, using techniques and methods from the domain of natural language processing. The students will present their results and write a paper about their research.

    Learning Goals: Students will be equipped with practical experience with conducting scientific data-science projects. They will train their presentation skills, learn to communicate in research projects and receive feedback.

    Examination: Written elaboration (90%) and presentation (10%)

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 13.02.24 – 28.05.24 Tuesday 13:45 – 17:00 room 314–315 (L 15, 1–6)
    MET 931: Topics in Advanced Sampling Methods: Design and Causal Inference
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: MET 931
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    The reading course is aimed at Ph.D. students in or beyond their second year to support them during their research phase. 1st year PhD students are welcomed to attend the class as well.

    Recommended: Knowledge of basic statistics and prior experience with R or Stata is helpful, but not necessary.

    Course Content

    This reading course provides a hands-on and paper-based approach to understanding and analyzing data. For many projects, collection of new data or experimental designs are the only way to answer a research question or to provide the decisive complementary evidence. Different ways to collect data can have important implications for model estimation and evaluation, parameter inference, and policy conclusions. Standard econometric methods start from assumptions about the sampling procedure and try to cope with the limitations of a given dataset. Instead, we start at the design stage and examine the interplay between sampling and experimental methods, statistical inference and estimation of causal effects. We will use the German Business Panel as point in case and implement cutting-edge methods to gain insights into the causal mechanisms behind reported outcomes. In each session, one of the participants will present a research paper, which we will discuss in light of concrete implementation at trial scale. Participants are encouraged to present research that is valuable for their own thesis or may be assigned to present a topic.

    In addition to presenting a paper and participating in the discussion, students are expected to write a short technical report that summarizes the methods and implications in a way useful for peers who want to use the newly collected data or learn about experimental results.

    Learning outcomes:

    The specific applications cover a broad set of skills with a focus on design of questionnaires and survey experiments, data analysis and quantitative methods, classification, inference, writing of own reports, and opportunities for own research.

    • Analytical Skills/Problem-Solving:
    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 13.02.24 – 28.05.24 Tuesday 10:15 – 11:45 room O 048
    RES (bridge course): Mental health during dissertations: “Research is Me-Search” (GESS doctoral students only)
    5 ECTS
    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: RES (bridge course)
    Credits: 5
    Course Content

    Almost every doctoral dissertation is marked by difficult periods and times of frustration, which can also affect one´s mental health.

    Not only aspects directly related to one's dissertation but also structural and/or personal aspects can make it challenging to maintain one's mental health.

    The aim of this course is to get to know and discuss typical risk factors and challenging constellations doctoral students are likely to face during their dissertations. The course will consist of literature-informed/guided group discussions of several predefined topics addressing common difficulties during dissertation projects. During the first session(s), the group will decide the particular topics of interest for each of the sessions based on a brief literature discussion and their personal interests. Then, based on selected literature provided by the lecturer, the students will discuss these topics both from an academic standpoint and from their individual perspective/experience during their dissertation project. Each session will thus serve as information input and offer room for discussion and exchange. The aim of this format is to foster student's knowledge about mental health during dissertation projects and open up possibilities to reflect one´s own situation and standpoints in a group of peers.

    The course will be taught by Dr. Matthias Volz

    Course  requirements & assessment

    Students need to be willing to read articles, and discuss and articulate their own views on typical challenging situations during dissertation projects in guided group discussions.

    Schedule
    Seminar
    bi-weekly 20.02.24 – 19.03.24 Tuesday 10:15 – 11:45 209 in B6, 30–32
    bi-weekly 09.04.24 – 21.05.24 Tuesday 10:15 – 11:45 209 in B6, 30–32
    RES (Bridge Course): New Perspectives on Economics and Politics
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: RES (Bridge Course)
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    Prerequisites: For each session, students need to have read the respective book in advance. (Detailed schedule will be provided in an introductory session.)

    Form of Assessment: Essay 50 %, Class Participation 50 %


    Friedman, M. (1963). Capitalism and Freedom. University of Chicago Press.
    Deaton, A. (2023). Economics in America: An Immigrant Economist Explores the Land of Inequality. Princeton University Press.
    Sandel, M. J. (2020). The Tyranny of Merit: What’s Become of the Common Good?. Penguin UK.
    Bowles, S. (2016). The moral economy. Yale University Press.
    Formal: Students need to be enrolled a PhD program at the GESS at the University of Mannheim, or the Master of Political Science.
    Required: Willingness to read, discuss, challenge, engage and think for yourself is critical for this course.

    Course Content

    We live in interesting times both, economically and politically. Many observers point to crises and uncertain developments in the economic and political world. Making sense of the nature of these challenges and pointing toward economic and political solutions for the future requires new perspectives. This is a course about the big and bold questions in economics and politics. How can or should economics and politics be organized to best serve society? What does it mean to put humans as they really are at the center of economic and political thinking? What role do morals and values, or dignity and respect, play for the way economics and politics work? What are the implications of digitalization for capitalism and freedom?

    We will try to come to grips with these questions by reading and discussing four key books on various new perspectives at the intersection between economics and politics. The aim of this course is to go as deep as we can and to get as much out of an in-class discussion of the material as possible. Willingness to acquire and read the books is a must. If you are unsure about whether or not you would want to take on the commitment of reading four books in one semester then this course is probably not the right one for you.

    Students need to be willing to read books, form their own opinions on them, and elaborate on and defend their own views in group discussions and a final essay.

    We will meet for an introductory session on Monday 4.3. at 13.45–15.15 and then meet again for a total of seven Thursday and Wednesday sessions after the Easter break: 11.4., 25.4., 2.5., 8.5., 16.5., 23.5., and 29.5. at 8.30–11.45.

    Competences acquired

    Learning outcomes: The aim of this course is to engage in intellectual dialogue, to develop a personal point of view on some of the central economic and political questions we face today, and to allow ourselves to think creatively, freely, and out of the box. After completing this course, students will have read important texts on new perspectives in economics and politics, they will have trained their ability to distill an own point of view from the writings of leading scientists, they will train their writing and discussion skills, and they will train to creatively apply what they have read in writing about the future of economics and politics in our society.

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Introduction to the Course 04.03.24 – 04.03.24 Monday 13:45 – 15:15 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 11.04.24 – 11.04.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 25.04.24 – 25.04.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 02.05.24 – 02.05.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 08.05.24 – 08.05.24 Wednesday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 16.05.24 – 16.05.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 B6, 23–25, Room A301
    Lecture 23.05.24 – 23.05.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 29.05.24 – 29.05.24 Wednesday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    TAX 922: Reading Course Taxation Research
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: TAX 922
    Credits: 5
    Course Content

    The course provides a forum to discuss recent state-of-the art papers in taxation research (mostly applied empirical). All covered papers are recently published or in the working paper stage. In each class session, one student briefly presents a research paper before the paper is discussed in class. All students are expected to read the research paper to be discussed in preparation for the class and it is one main objectives of the course that papers are lively discussed among all class participants.

    Students can choose papers which they wish to present or the responsible instructors provide a selection from which to pick. Students are encouraged to choose papers which are on the reading list for their thesis. The course could also serve as a forum for discussing paper drafts of peers or researchers within the network.

    In addition to presenting a paper in class, students are expected to write a referee report for a research paper. This will teach how to evaluate a paper critically and how to write a referee report.

    The reading course is particularly aimed at 2nd and higher year Ph.D. students to support them during their research phase. 1st year PhD students are welcomed to attend the class as well. Students can attend and earn credits for both this class as well as the related class TAX 923 (which is taught in the fall semester).

    Learning outcomes:

    • Know your field and related fields: Learn about the literature, both in your own (sub-field) of interest and other fields.
    • Commit to a reading routine for your thesis
    • Community building: The reading group will spawn discussion and encourage community building
    • Ability to present and confidence building: Learn how to present well. (This is often easier with a paper that somebody else wrote – one is not as emotionally involved in the question/ approach/ results as with one’s own paper.)
    • Discussion competence: Learn how to be a good seminar participant: Behave well, ask clear questions, discuss in an appropriate manner etc.
    • Ability to understand: Learn how to read and approach research papers and learn to summarize the main message/points of the paper
    • Participation in scientific discourse
    • Learn how to evaluate a paper critically
    • Writing a referee report

    Form of assessment: Paper (referee report) 40 %, Presentation 30 %, Class Participation 30 %

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 15.02.24 – 23.05.24 Thursday 13:45 – 15:15 SO 133