A doctoral student is holding a laptop and is pointing out a course on the screen where the schedule for different doctoral courses can be seen.

Spring 2024

  • Economics

    E801: Advanced Microeconomics II
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: core course
    Course Number: E801
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    E700, E701, E702, E703

    Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades

    One final examination of 120 min. A prerequisite for the admission to the examination is the regular participation in class, submission of problem sets, good performance in exercise sessions.

    Course Content

    The course provides an advanced introduction to the theory of general equilibrium. This is a subject that is technically demanding and typically taught only superficially in more elementary classes. It builds in particular on the introductory microeconomics class E702, but also uses the mathematical tools provided in E700, and builds on themes developed in macroeconomics in E701. It is related to the advanced macroeconomics classes, but develops the conceptual sides of the equilibrium problem in more detail than those classes.

    The course treats the following topics:

    1. Aggregate Demand, 2. Production Theory, 3. Exchange Economies, 4. Production Economies, 5. Uncertainty and Arrow-Debreu Equilibrium, 6. Basic Asset Pricing.

    The course teaches the fundamentals of economic equilibrium theory and thus lays the foundations for almost all aggregate theories in economics, such as macroeconomics, international trade, finance, environmental economics, etc. It is complemented by intensive problem-solving work by the students and exercise sessions.

    Teaching Method: Lecture (4 SWS) + Exercise (2 SWS)

    Competences acquired

    After taking this class, students are supposed to know the core concepts of general economic equilibrium, such as the Law of Demand, contingent markets, Walrasian equilibrium, the core, arbitrage-free allocations, market incompleteness, etc.

    They are able to analyze problems involving these concepts independently and apply them to issues arising in various fields of economics, such as international trade, macroeconomics, public finance, and others. Special emphasis is put on the technical competence in applying these concepts.

    After taking this class, students should understand the role of the price mechanism in different economic contexts and analyze its functioning for the research questions they are studying. They can distinguish a competitive problem from a game-theoretic or decision-theoretic problem and use the corresponding formal and conceptual tools with confidence and competence.

    They can assess the scope of equilibrium arguments and decide whether an equilibrium-theoretic approach to a certain research question is appropriate. They understand the common structure of economic equilibrium models and can use this knowledge to transfer insights from one subfield to another.

    Contact Information: Prof. Dr. Ernst-Ludwig von Thadden, Phone: (0621) 181 – 1915; email: vthadden@uni-mannheim.de; Office: 3.19, VWL-Building; Office hours: upon appointment.

    Teaching Assistant: Emre Oral

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 12.02.24 – 11.03.24 Monday 10:15 – 11:45 L7, 3–5, P044
    Lecture 13.02.24 Tuesday 15:30 – 17:00 L7, 3–5, P043
    Lecture 14.02.24 – 13.03.24 Wednesday 08:30 – 10:00 L7, 3–5, P044
    Lecture 05.03.24 Tuesday 08:30 – 10:00 L7, 3–5, P044
    Exam 08.04.24 – 08.04.24 Monday 10:00 – 12:00 O 135 (Saal der starken Marken), Schloss Ostflügel
    Tutorial
    Tutorial 22.02.24 – 29.02.24 Thursday 13:45 – 15:15 L7, 3–5, P044
    Tutorial 14.03.24 – 21.03.24 Thursday 13:45 – 15:15 L7, 3–5, P044
    Tutorial 18.03.24 Monday 10:15 – 11:45 L7, 3–5, P044
    Tutorial 20.03.24 Wednesday 08:30 – 10:00 L7, 3–5, P044
    E802: Advanced Macroeconomics II
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: core course
    Course Number: E802
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    E700, E701, E702, E703

    Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades:
    Final examination, solutions to problem sets, and participation in exercise sessions.

    Course Content

    This course covers basic methods useful for dynamic economic modeling under rational expectations.

    1. Linear Rational Expectations (RE) Models: linearizing economic models and solving linear RE models: determinacy, indeterminacy, and 'sunspot' equilibria
    2. Linear RE models and Vector Auto-Regressions (VARs): state space representation of economic models, VAR representation of observables, invertibility problems, identification of economic shocks
    3. Linear Quadratic (LQ) Dynamic Programming: solving LQ problems: Ricatti equation, invariant subspace methods, stochastic problems and certainty equivalence
    4. Introduction to the New Keynesian Model and its Linearized Form
    Competences acquired

    After the course students will be able to apply and understand the basic tools used in business cycle analysis and will be able to follow the recent literature on dynamic stochastic general equilibrium models. They also learn how these techniques could be applied in other fields concerned with dynamic decision making.

    Teaching Assistant: Bjarne Horst

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 14.02.24 – 20.03.24 Wednesday 10:15 – 11:45 L7, 3–5, P044
    Lecture 14.02.24 – 20.03.24 Wednesday 13:45 – 15:15 L7, 3–5, P044
    Lecture 28.02.24 Wednesday 12:00 – 13:30 L7, 3–5, P044
    Lecture 13.03.24 Wednesday 12:00 – 13:30 L7, 3–5, P044
    Lecture 20.03.24 Wednesday 12:00 – 13:30 L7, 3–5, P044
    Exam 10.04.24 – 10.04.24 Wednesday 09:00 – 11:00 O 133 (KPGM-Hörsaal), Schloss Ostflügel
    Tutorial
    Tutorial 12.02.24 – 18.03.24 Monday 15:30 – 17:00 L7, 3–5, P044
    E803: Advanced Econometrics II
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: core course
    Course Number: E803
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    E700, E701, E702, E703

    Course Content

    The course provides an introduction to semi- and nonparametric estimation methods in microeconometrics, as well as to bootstrap theory and treatment effect evaluation.

    Competences acquired

    On successful completion of the module, students are expected to attain the following competences:
    Attain advanced theoretical knowledge in econometrics in the specific topics the module covers at a high technical and mathematical level.
    Be familiar with current theories and recent developments in the specific topics of focus for the module.
    – Attain a higher/advanced level of analytical capability.

    Be in a position to take on follow-up advanced theoretical and applied econometrics modules.
    Attain the level of competence that permits independent undertakings in search of new knowledge in the specialist areas the module covers.
    Attain the level of competence required to carry out (theoretical) research-oriented projects independently.
    To be in a position to exchange information, ideas, and solutions with experts of the field on a scientific level as well as with laymen.
    To be able to communicate and to work effectively and efficiently with people and in groups.
    Graduates are able to communicate precisely in the English specialist language.

    Contact Information: Prof. Yoshiyasu Rai, Ph.D., yraimail-mail.uni-mannheim.de

    Literature/recommended textbooks
    Bruce E. Hansen (2019), Econometrics, Manuscript, University of Wisconsin.
    A. W. van der Vaart (1998), Asymptotic Statistics, Cambridge University Press

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 13.02.24 – 19.03.24 Tuesday 10:15 – 13:30 L7, 3–5, P044
    Exam 12.04.24 – 12.04.24 Friday 10:00 – 12:00 O 145 (Heinrich-Vetter-Hörsaal), Schloss Ostflügel
    Tutorial
    Tutorial 12.02.24 – 18.03.24 Monday 12:00 – 13:30 L7, 3–5, P044
    E804: Advanced Microeconomics III
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: core course
    Course Number: E804
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    E700, E701, E702, E703, E801, E802, E803

    Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades: Written Exam

    Course Content

    The goal is to provide an introduction to the role of private information and its strategic use in various environments including markets, contracts, negotiations, regulation, communication, political processes, and expert advice.

    Summary of Contents:
        I. Adverse Selection.
        II. Signaling.
        III. Screening.
        IV. Moral Hazard.
        V. Mechanism design.

    Competences acquired

    Successful participants’ understanding of the role of private information in strategic environments is at the forefront of current research. They are ready to begin developing their own research questions in this field of study, can synthesize their knowledge with the study of economic problems in other fields, and are able to find solutions to practical problems concerning beneficial regulatory interventions in various contexts of market failure. Crucially, successful participants understand the fundamental tension between private information and achieving social goals. This understanding enlightens their judgment of conflict and cooperation in a wide range of social situations beyond the narrow context of economics.

    Teaching Assistants: Julian Klix, Emre Oral

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 15.04.24 – 27.05.24 Monday 10:15 – 11:45 L7, 3–5, P 044
    Lecture 16.04.24 – 28.05.24 Tuesday 10:15 – 11:45 L7, 3–5, P 044
    Tutorial
    Tutorial (Group 1) 17.04.24 – 29.05.24 Wednesday 12:00 – 13:30 L7, 3–5, P 044
    Tutorial (Group 2) 18.04.24 – 30.05.24 Thursday 13:45 – 15:15 B6, 30–32, 209
    E805: Advanced Macroeconomics III
    5 ECTS
    Course Type: core course
    Course Number: E805
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    Requirements for the Assignment of ECTS Credits and Grades 

    There will be problem sets and a final exam. The course grade is based on your performance in the problem sets (20%) and the final exam (80%). 

    Lecturer: Prof. Dr. Moritz Kuhn

    Teaching Assistant: Yann Müller

    Course Content

    This course focuses on dynamic decision making and heterogeneity in macroeconomics. The course introduces the theory of modern macroeconomics, basic tools, and discusses various applications. 

    The topics of this course are: 

    1. Consumption/savings: complete markets, incomplete markets, overlapping generations 

    2. Labor markets: frictional labor markets, wage dispersion, policy implications 

    Teaching Method: Lectures (4 SWS) and Exercise (1 SWS) 

    Competences acquired

    The goal of the course is to provide students with a deeper understanding of the mathematical methods used in modern macroeconomics. The course will introduce students to important classes of models and theories of heterogeneity used in research in modern macroeconomics. Students will also be introduced to empirical research in macroeconomics to learn how to connect theory and data. The TA sessions apply the methods and theories from class to prepare students to conduct independent research for their Ph.D. (or Master's) thesis. Students will learn how the topics from class connect macroeconomics to other areas of economics and how the methodology, e.g. dynamic programming, can be used in other areas. 

    Recommended literature 

    • Recursive Macroeconomic Theory, Lars Ljungqvist, Thomas J. Sargent 
    • Recursive Methods in Economic Dynamics, Nancy L. Stokey, Robert E. Lucas Jr., Edward C. Prescott 

    • Equilibrium Unemployment Theory, Christopher A. Pissarides 

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 15.04.24 – 27.05.24 Monday 08:30 – 10:00 L7, 3–5, P044
    Lecture 16.04.24 – 28.05.24 Tuesday 08:30 – 10:00 L7, 3–5, P044
    Tutorial
    Tutorial 18.04.24 – 30.05.24 Thursday 15:30 – 17:00 L7, 3–5, P044
    E806: Advanced Econometrics III
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: core course
    Course Number: E806
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    E700, E701, E702, E703, E801, E802, E803

    Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades: Written exam and assignments

    Course Content

    In Part I we first reconsider extremum estimators, with a focus on M-estimation, then discuss the three main testing principles (LR, LM, WALD) and, finally, introduce the bootstrap in relation to testing. While Part II is devoted to basic analysis of panel data (models), Part III deals with time series analysis. The latter part is somewhat more detailed but still just focusses on stationary time series set-ups.

    Competences acquired

    Mathematical argumentation, Ability to read scientific texts

    Literature:

    • Cameron, A.C. and Trivedi, P.K. (2005), Microeconometrics: Methods and Applications, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    • Hamilton, J.D. (1994), Time Series Analysis, Princeton: Princeton University Press.
    • Hayashi, F. (2000), Econometrics, Princeton: Princeton University Press.
    • Horowitz, J. L. (2001), The Bootstrap, in J. J. Heckmann & E. bE. Leamer (eds), Handbook of Econometrics, Vol. 5, North-Holland, Amsterdam.
    • Lütkepohl, H. and Krätzig, M. (2004), Applied Time Series Econometrics, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    • Wooldridge, J.M. (2010), Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data, Cambridge: The MIT Press.
    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 17.04.24 – 29.05.24 Wednesday 10:15 – 11:45 L7, 3–5, P044
    Lecture 18.04.24 – 30.05.24 Thursday 08:30 – 10:00 L7, 3–5, P044
    Tutorial
    Tutorial 18.04.24 – 30.05.24 Thursday 10:15 – 11:45 L7, 3–5, P044
    RES (Bridge Course): Financial Economics of Climate and Sustainability
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    Pre-requisites and finance context: The course will assume that participants have a background in core graduate-level finance. The course will cover topics from a variety of subfields in finance (asset pricing, financial intermediation, household finance, corporate finance). The introductory block of three classes is intended to orient students to the science of climate change as well as to refresh key concepts from economics and finance; the remaining classes will dive into detail on current research in different subfield. We will conclude with a discussion of open topics in this field. We expect that the course will be useful to doctoral students in finance, economics, and accounting. As a global class, we will be on Zoom.

    Course Content

    The purpose of the course is to (a) introduce graduate students to questions and methods in the rapidly evolving fields of climate/sustainable finance; (b) connect researchers from across the globe interested in this topic to stimulate more rigorous, relevant, and collaborative work. Addressing climate change demands changes in natural, social, and economic systems and will require greater collaboration. In that spirit, this course is being offered by a team of professors from different schools and universities across the globe. Each instructor will deliver one or more lectures and there will be students from a number of different schools.

    Our teaching group consists of current and former AFA and EFA presidents and some of the leading climate finance scholars, including Laura Starks (current AFA President), Patrick Bolton (former AFA President), Stefano Giglio, Marcin Kacperczyk (former EFA President), Caroline Flammer, Geoff Heal, Stefan Reichelstein, Johannes Stroebel, Ben Caldecott and Peter Tufano.

    Course Requirement: Beyond weekly preparation and participation, students will be expected to write a paper either laying out a potential research topic or synthesizing a set of related papers that were not discussed in class. Papers should not exceed eight pages, plus applicable tables and exhibits.

    Schedule
    Lecture
    30.01.24 – 23.04.24 Tuesday 17:00 – 19:00 Zoom
    This session is in person! 20.02.24 Tuesday 16:00 – 17:00 SO 318
    CDSS Job Talk Series: Next GESS
    0 ECTS
    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: CDSS Job Talk Series
    Course Content

    Johannes Lattmann is the recipient of the 2023 CDSS Young Scholar Award, which he received for his project 'Next GESS – Career Talks for PhD and Master students with Industry, NGOs, and Policy Institutions'.

    For this upcoming semester he organized the “Next GESS” Job Talk Series for doctoral students. Every Thursday, from 16.30 – 17.30 he invites a speaker to talk Online via Zoom about their job and career. The precise schedule can be found in the Syllabus which you can find in the appendix.

    In the context of this series, he has invited speakers from a variety of companies and institutions including IBM, CEPS, OECD, UNESCO and many more. Through their experiences, this series aims to provide insights into exciting career trajectories. Eventually, this series should inform you about career opportunities and provide valuable insights about application processes and the day-to-day work life in different institutions. 

    Each session contains a 15–20 minutes long presentation by the speaker, introducing the respective job or institution. This is followed by a Q&A session in which you can ask questions. 

    Talk schedule

    E800: CDSE Seminar (2nd & 3rd year)
    12 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: E800
    Credits: 12
    Prerequisites

    2nd and higher year Ph.D. students from the Center for Doctoral Studies in Economics (CDSE), 2nd year students from the Master of Economic Research

    Organizers: Prof. Michelle Sovinsky, Ph.D., Prof. Camille Urvoy, Ph.D.

    Course Content

    Method (hours per week): Colloquium (2 h)

    Duration of the module: 4 semesters

    ECTs awarded after each semester: 3 ECTs

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 13.02.24 – 28.05.24 Tuesday 15:30 – 17:00 L7, 3–5, 001
    E8004: Reading Course in Environmental Economics (3rd & 4th year)
    2.5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: E8004
    Credits: 2.5
    Prerequisites

    Presentations

    Course Content

    Students will read, present and discuss papers in environmental economics.

    Competences acquired
    • Presentation skills
    • Participation in scientific discourse
    • Absorption of recent research in environmental economics
    • Acquisition of a reading routine
    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 19.02.24 – 27.05.24 Monday, every two weeks 13:45 – 15:15 L9, 1–2, P043
    E8008: Doctoral Colloquium (3rd & 4th year)
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: E8008
    Credits: 5
    Schedule
    Colloquium
    Colloquium 15.02.24 – 30.05.24 Thursday 13:45 – 15:15 L7, 3–5, 2.44
    E8014: Quantitative Macroeconomics with Heterogeneous Households (2nd year)
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: E8014
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    E700, E701, E702, E703; some familiarity with a programming language of your choosing (e.g. Python, Fortran, Julia, C, MATLAB)

    Grading and ECTS credits: problem sets and presentations

    Course Content

    This course will discuss how the household heterogeneity affects the economy and how the macroeconomic policy and existing market frictions underlie the level of inequality. To this end it will introduce the standard incomplete-markets model, an arguable workhorse of modern macroeconomics, in which households face uninsurable income risk and use risk-free assets to smooth the marginal utility of their consumption. This will be extended to: (1) models with overlapping generations and a life-cycle component and (2) two-asset models. Next, we will recast the standard framework in continuous time to achieve greater computational performance than traditional discrete-time methods.

    Course roadmap:

    1. Optimal stochastic growth model and income fluctuations problem.
    2. Solving DP problems with exogenous and endogenous labor supply using value function iteration.
    3. Root-finding procedures (covered only bisection but can cover Newton methods as well).
    4. Policy function iteration.
    5. (One-dimensional) approximation: (a) piecewise linear approximation; (b) Chebychev polynomials.
    6. Different types of grids: (a) equispaced; (b) exponential grid; (c) power-space grid.
    7. Endogenous gridpoints method (EGM) (Carroll, EL 2005).
    8. Discretization of income process: (a) Tauchen (EL, 1986); (b) Rouwenhorst (Cooley, 1995); (c) Random walk in finite horizon.
    9. Simulations: how to generate random numbers from an arbitrary distribution.
    10. Standard incomplete markets model. Saving motives. Computing invariant distribution.
    11. Lifecycle incomplete market economy with OLG structure. Different earnings dynamics: (a) Guerrieri-Lorenzoni (QJE, 2017); (b) Castañeda et al. (JPE, 2003).
    12. Two-asset SIM model with discrete adjustment (Kaplan and Violante, Ecta 2014). EGM for the two-asset problem. Multidimensional piecewise linear approximation.
    13. Heterogeneous Agent Economies in Continuous Time (Achdou et al., 2017).

    Competences acquired

    The students gain knowledge and understanding how to use numerical methods to solve dynamic programing problems.

    Contact Information: Prof. Krzysztof Pytka, Ph.D.; email: pytka@uni-mannheim.de; phone: (0621) 181-181-7; Office: L7 3-5, room 2.09, Office hours: by appointment.

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 14.02.24 – 10.04.24 Wednesday 12:00 – 15:15 L7, 3–5, P043
    E8022: Industrial Organization Empirics (2nd year)
    9,5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: E8022
    Credits: 9,5
    Prerequisites

    E700, E701, E702, E703

    4 SWS (3 SWS lecture + 1 SWS exercice)

    Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades

    Assignments: 4 (75%)
    Presentation (20%)
    Class participation (5%)

    Course Content

    The course examines the organization of firms, industries and markets. Industrial Organization studies the strategic interactions of firms in markets, and their implications for firms’ profits and consumer welfare. Market power and market structure are key concepts in IO. Market power (or monopoly power) is the ability of a firm, or group of firms, to gain extraordinary profits above those needed to remunerate the inputs. Market structure is a description of the number of firms in the market and of their respective market shares. The course has the goal to develop an active understanding of econometric analysis of market power and competition. Such goal is illustrated with applications to competition policy and competitive strategy. We will study empirically the determinants of firms’ and consumers’ behavior and market outcomes in the context of problems of price competition, investment, innovation, product design, mergers, or market entry-exit. Topics will cover: econometric issues and methods in the estimation of production functions, demand estimation, static models of Cournot and Bertrand competition, empirical models of entry and some general ideas of dynamic structural models.

    Competences acquired

    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to develop and actively understand econometric analysis of market power and competition. They will be able to combine data, economic models, and appropriate econometric techniques to answer empirical questions in Industrial Organization.

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 12.02.24 – 27.05.24 Monday 15:30 – 17:00 L7, 3–5, P043
    Lecture/Tutorial 16.02.24 – 31.05.24 Friday 13:45 – 15:15 L7, 3–5, P044
    E8032: Inequality and Economic Policy (2nd year)
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: E8032
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    Formal: 2nd and higher year Ph.D. students from the Center for Doctoral Studies in Economics (CDSE).
    2nd year students from the Master of Economic Research.

    Requirements for the assignment of ECTS Credits and Grades
    •    Presentation 80%
    •    Discussion 20%

    Course Content

    The course will discuss current research that analyzes the effect of economic policy on growth and inequality using the tools of modern macroeconomics.

    Competences acquired

    Students will gain a deeper understanding of the effect of economic policy on growth and inequality.

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 14.02.24 – 29.05.24 Wednesday 15:30 – 17:00 L7, 3–5, 002
    E8038: Public Economics II (2nd year)
    7,5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: E8038
    Credits: 7,5
    Prerequisites

    E700, E701, E702, E703, E801, E802, E803, E805, E806 or equivalent, Public Economics I highly recommended

    Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades: Presentation (45%), Research proposal (45%), Class participation (10%)

    Course Content

    This course is the second part of a two-semester PhD-level sequence in Public Economics. Building on the first part (E8037), we study important topics in modern Public Economics, including behavioral responses to taxation and social insurance. We also touch on Public Economics & Development and Behavioral Public Economics. Within each topic, the focus is on empirical work (with some theory) and areas of frontier research. Recent research papers serve as examples to guide the discussion. The course features student presentations of working papers, writing a research proposal, and a visit to an academic conference.

    Competences acquired

    PhD students will acquire thorough knowledge and understanding of current research in Public Economics. They will critically evaluate papers, in particular empirical research designs, and start formulating research questions. Ultimately, the goal of the course is to enable PhD students to begin conducting their own independent research in Public Economics.

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 15.02.24 – 23.05.24 Thursday, every two weeks 13:45 – 15:15 L7, 3–5, P043
    Lecture 15.02.24 – 30.05.24 Thursday 15:30 – 17:00 L7, 3–5, P043
    E8041: Environmental Economics Research Seminar (3rd & 4th year)
    2.5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: E8041
    Credits: 2.5
    Course Content

    In this seminar, internal and external speakers discuss their recent research in environmental economics. Students working on an empirical or theoretical project that is related to environmental economics are welcome to present. Please contact the instructor to set up a date.

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 20.02.24 – 28.05.24 Tuesday, every two weeks 12:00 – 13:30 L9, 1–2, 002
    E8049: Research Seminar in International Economics (3rd & 4th year)
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: E8049
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    Core PhD courses, PhD International Trade

    Grading and ECTS credits

    Grades are based on active participation, presentation of research project: participation in class (50%), presentations (50%).

    Course Content

    This is a research seminar for 3rd and 4th year students who are writing their thesis in the field of international economics. Students present their own research projects and we discuss relevant papers in international economics.

    Competences acquired

    The aim of the course is to follow and guide students during the thesis writing process. The acquired competences will be to develop and structure research projects in international economics, to improve academic writing and presentation skills. 

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 14.02.24 – 29.05.24 Wednesday 10:15 – 11:45 L7, 3–5, 410 (Besprechungsraum)
    E8056: Topics in Theoretical Industrial Organization (2nd year)
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: E8056
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    E700 – E703, E801 – E806

    Grading

    Oral exam (30mins; 80%), class participation (20%)

    Course Content

    PhD-level course on selected topics at the frontier of research in industrial organization.

    Competences acquired

    Acquisition of a deep understanding of selected key topics at the frontier of research in industrial organization. The course helps enable students to engage in advanced research in industrial organization.

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 13.02.24 – 21.05.24 Tuesday, every two weeks 10:15 – 13:30 L9, 1–2, 002
    E8057: Research in Empirical Industrial Organization (3rd and 4th year)
    7.5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: E8057
    Credits: 7.5
    Prerequisites

    Second year empirical IO PhD or instructor permission.

    Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades    

    Pass/Fail based on discussion and presentation in class

    Course Content

    This course is for PhD students writing their dissertation in Empirical Industrial Organization. It is intended to guide students in their dissertation research.

    Competences acquired

    Doctoral students will learn how to solve common problems arising during the research process, how to present their results, how to write up their project, and how to present their research. 

    Further information:

    Please send a CV 2 weeks prior to registration.

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 15.02.24 – 30.05.24 Thursday 11:00 – 13:45 L9, 1–2, 002
    E8059: Economic History Reading Group (3rd & 4th year)
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: E8059
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    E601 – 603 (or equivalent)

    Grading: Final essay (50%), Chair of Discussion (25%), Class Participation (25%)

    Course Content

    This reading group is for Ph.D. candidates and advanced master students with an interest in economic history. We will discuss recent research papers concerning relevant topics in economic history, demography, labor economics, innovation and technological change. Some of the papers will cover tools and advances in methods that are useful for economic historians and economists in conducting empirical research. Examples are applications of machine learning to digitize data, automatized linking, or the use of GIS methods.

    Competences acquired

    A major goal of this class ist to learn about new fields and methods of research in economic history. This knowledge will enable students to identify and discuss new open questions for future research in a constructive and friendly environment. Participants are expected to attend all sessions, read all discussed papers beforehand, and lead at least one discussion session.

    Further information: The reading list will be provided in the first meeting.

    Contact information: Prof. Philipp Ager, Ph.D. (philipp.ager@uni-mannheim.de), Prof. Dr. Jochen Streb (jochen.streb@uni-mannheim.de)

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 14.02.24 – 29.05.24 Wednesday 08:30 – 10:00 L9, 1–2, 002
    E8065: Introduction to Environmental Science of Air Pollution for Environmental and Health Economics (2nd year)
    2,5 ECTS
    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: E8065
    Credits: 2,5
    Prerequisites

    None. Can be combined with other courses in environmental economics (E8004, E8041, E8048)

    Grading

    Participation in class (20%), three assignments (20%+20%+40%)

    Lecturer: Dr. Yixuan Gu

    Course Content

    The objective of this interdisciplinary course is to provide students with fundamental knowledge of the atmospheric environment which will help them to increase the scientific rigor of their research projects in environmental and health economics. The course will introduce students to (i) the basic chemical and physical behaviors of air pollutants, (ii) the impacts of pollution exposure to public health, (iii) state-of-the art model tools used in research related to the atmospheric environment, and (iv) relevant data sources and products. The content can be slightly adjusted according to the interests of participating students.

    The course will combine the lecture with some practical assignments, such as data analyses and simple model simulations, so that students can apply these skills to their own research after completing the class.

    Competences acquired

    Improved understandings of the basic behaviors of air pollutants in the atmosphere
    Ability to use a simple atmospheric model to trace the movements of air pollutants
    Ability to work with relevant data product to conduct analyses

    Relevant readings suggested

    Seinfeld, J. H. and Pandis, S. N. (2016). Atmospheric chemistry and physics: from air pollution to climate change. third version, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, New Jersey, 2016.

    Murray, C. J. L., Aravkin, A. Y., Zheng, P., Abbafati, C., Abbas, K. M., Abbasi-Kangevari, M., et al. (2020). Global burden of 87 risk factors in 204 countries and territories, 1990–2019: A systematic analysis for the global burden of disease study 2019. The Lancet, 396(10258), 1223–1249.

    Contact: Dr. Yixuan Gu; Email address: yixuan.gumail-uni-mannheim.de; Office hours: by appointment (meetings on-site or online)

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 14.02.24 – 10.04.24 Wednesday 10:15 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, 003 (Seminarraum)
    E8067: Reading Group in Theoretical Industrial Organization
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: E8067
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    E700-E703 and E801-E806

    Course Content

    Workload: 150 working hours, including 21 hours class time and 129 hours independent study time.

    Goals and Contents: This seminar is aimed at students writing or planning to write their dissertation in industrial organization or applied microeconomic theory. It covers papers at the frontier of research in theoretical industrial organization.

    Grading: Presentation

    A reading list will be communicated at a further stage.

    Competences acquired

    Ability to present academic research articles, ability to participate in scientific discourse, knowledge of the theoretical industrial organization literature, ability to engage in research in industrial organization and applied microeconomic theory.

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 21.02.24 – 29.05.24 Wednesday 10:15 – 11:45 L7, 3–5, P043
    E821: Topics in Empirical Development Economics (3rd & 4th year)
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: E821
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    E700, E701, E702, E703, E801, E802, E803, E805, E806, successful completion of first two years of PhD programme

    Requirements for the assignment of ECTS Credits and Grades

    A written seminar paper on a topic of own choice and a presentation in class.

    Course Content

    Research seminar where Ph.D. students, who have completed their course work, present their own research and receive feedback.  (Topics in empirical development economics with microeconometric methods. Development economics can be subdivided into three branches: Macro, micro theory and empirical with micro data. We only cover the last area. Macro and micro theory have been the driving forces of development economics initially, but with the increasing availability of microdata for Africa, Asia and Latin America in the last two decades, the foundation of the J-PAL network and the Nobel Prize in 2019, empirical development economics has been gaining attention.)

    Competences acquired

    Doctoral Students will know how to
    – identify a research question,
    – put a research question into context of the relevant literature,
    – present their current stage of research to their peers in a seminar environment.

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 16.02.24 – 31.05.24 Friday 12:00 – 13:30 L7, 3–5, P044
    E839: Topics in Macroeconomics (3rd & 4th year)
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: E839
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    First and second year PhD courses.

    Requirements for the assignment

    Presenting of Research Projects

    Course Content

    Research seminar where Ph.D. students, who have completed their course work, present their own research and receive feedback. Occasionally we will also have an outside speaker.

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 14.02.24 – 29.05.24 Wednesday 15:30 – 17:00 L7, 3–5, P043
    E846: PhD Reading Course in Industrial Organization (3rd & 4th year)
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: E846
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    E700-E703, E801-E806

    Requirements for the Assignment of ECTS Credits and Grades

    Presentation (100 %)

    Course Content

    This seminar is aimed at PhD students writing their dissertation in Industrial Organization. It is intended to guide students at all stages of dissertation research. The emphasis be on presentation and discussion of material by students.

    Competences acquired

    Doctoral students will know how to

    • identify a research question,
    • put a research question into context of the relevant literature,
    • present their current stage of research to their peers in a seminar environment.
    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 14.02.24 – 29.05.24 Wednesday 12:00 – 13:30 L9, 1–2, 002
    E854: Topics in Mechanism Design (2nd year)
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: E854
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    First-year sequence in the Economics PhD program

    Competences acquired

    Competences acquired. On successful completion of the module, students are expected to attain the following competences

    • Presentation skills
    • Participation in scientific discourse
    • Absorption of recent research in mechanism design
    • Acquisition of a reading routine
    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 12.02.24 – 27.05.24 Monday 10:15 – 11:45 L7, 3–5, P043
    E866: Research Seminar in Economic Policy (3rd & 4th year)
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: E866
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    E700-E703, E801-E806

    Grading

    At least one presentation. Students who wish to obtain ECTS credits should sign up for the course, students who do not wish to obtain credits should not sign up for the course.

    Course Content

    Students present and discuss policy related economic research.

    Competences acquired

    Students learn to apply economic theory and quantitative methods to policy problems.

    Further information: Students who would like to participate should contact Hans Grüner before the beginning of the semester

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 12.02.24 – 27.05.24 Monday 17:15 – 18:45 L7, 3–5, P043
    E873: Research Seminar in Public Economics (3rd & 4th year)
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: E873
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    E700-E703, E801-E806

    Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades

    Oral presentation of own reserach, contribution to discussion of other perticipants' reserach; only pass/ fail.

    Lecturers: Prof. Dr. Eckhard Janeba, Prof. Arthur Seibold, Ph.D., Prof. Dr. Holger Stichnoth

    Course Content

    Presentation and discussion of current research in public economics (external and internal speakers)

    Competences acquired

    Improve presentations skills, obtain feedback to improve research paper.

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 13.02.24 – 28.05.24 Tuesday 12:00 – 13:30 L7, 3–5, P043
    E878: Advanced PhD Seminar in Experimental Economics (3rd & 4th year)
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: E878
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    E700-E703, E801-E806. 

    Grading and assignment of ECTS credits: 

    Presentation and active participation

    Course Content

    In this seminar participants present and discuss their current research as well as ideas for future research. An important goal of the seminar is to provide a forum for students working on projects that use experimental methods or relate to themes in behavioral economics.

    Competences acquired

    If you are interested in the seminar, please contact Henrik Orzen.

    Schedule
    Seminar
    Seminar 13.02.24 – 28.05.24 Tuesday 13:45 – 15:15 L7, 3–5, 410 (Besprechungsraum)
    E917: Macroeconomics of Development (2nd year)
    7,5 ECTS
    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: E917
    Credits: 7,5
    Prerequisites

    E700-E703, E801-E806

    Grading:

    In-class presentation (30%), research proposal (40%), computation assignment (20%), and class participation (10%)

    Lecturer: Prof. Minki Kim, Ph.D.

    Course Content

    In this class, we will cover selected topics of frontier research at the intersection of macroeconomics and development. The class aims to set a solid basis for future research on the topic and get each student to identify and develop a viable research topic. Learning to read, evaluate, and present papers is an essential intermediate step toward generating novel research. For this reason, each student will present one paper during the course. Each student will pass in a research proposal by the end of the course as well. 

    Competences acquired

    Students will familiarize themselves with frontier academic discussions at the intersection of macroeconomics and development economics. They will also acquire skills to assess academic articles critically.

    Students will be evaluated based on:

    • In-class presentation (30%)
    • Research proposal (40%)
    • Computation assignment (20%)
    • Class participation (10%)
    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 12.02.24 – 27.05.24 Monday 15:30 – 18:00 L9, 1–2, 002
    MET 931: Topics in Advanced Sampling Methods: Design and Causal Inference
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: MET 931
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    The reading course is aimed at Ph.D. students in or beyond their second year to support them during their research phase. 1st year PhD students are welcomed to attend the class as well.

    Recommended: Knowledge of basic statistics and prior experience with R or Stata is helpful, but not necessary.

    Course Content

    This reading course provides a hands-on and paper-based approach to understanding and analyzing data. For many projects, collection of new data or experimental designs are the only way to answer a research question or to provide the decisive complementary evidence. Different ways to collect data can have important implications for model estimation and evaluation, parameter inference, and policy conclusions. Standard econometric methods start from assumptions about the sampling procedure and try to cope with the limitations of a given dataset. Instead, we start at the design stage and examine the interplay between sampling and experimental methods, statistical inference and estimation of causal effects. We will use the German Business Panel as point in case and implement cutting-edge methods to gain insights into the causal mechanisms behind reported outcomes. In each session, one of the participants will present a research paper, which we will discuss in light of concrete implementation at trial scale. Participants are encouraged to present research that is valuable for their own thesis or may be assigned to present a topic.

    In addition to presenting a paper and participating in the discussion, students are expected to write a short technical report that summarizes the methods and implications in a way useful for peers who want to use the newly collected data or learn about experimental results.

    Learning outcomes:

    The specific applications cover a broad set of skills with a focus on design of questionnaires and survey experiments, data analysis and quantitative methods, classification, inference, writing of own reports, and opportunities for own research.

    • Analytical Skills/Problem-Solving:
    Schedule
    Lecture
    Lecture 13.02.24 – 28.05.24 Tuesday 10:15 – 11:45 room O 048
    RES (bridge course): Mental health during dissertations: “Research is Me-Search” (GESS doctoral students only)
    5 ECTS
    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: RES (bridge course)
    Credits: 5
    Course Content

    Almost every doctoral dissertation is marked by difficult periods and times of frustration, which can also affect one´s mental health.

    Not only aspects directly related to one's dissertation but also structural and/or personal aspects can make it challenging to maintain one's mental health.

    The aim of this course is to get to know and discuss typical risk factors and challenging constellations doctoral students are likely to face during their dissertations. The course will consist of literature-informed/guided group discussions of several predefined topics addressing common difficulties during dissertation projects. During the first session(s), the group will decide the particular topics of interest for each of the sessions based on a brief literature discussion and their personal interests. Then, based on selected literature provided by the lecturer, the students will discuss these topics both from an academic standpoint and from their individual perspective/experience during their dissertation project. Each session will thus serve as information input and offer room for discussion and exchange. The aim of this format is to foster student's knowledge about mental health during dissertation projects and open up possibilities to reflect one´s own situation and standpoints in a group of peers.

    The course will be taught by Dr. Matthias Volz

    Course  requirements & assessment

    Students need to be willing to read articles, and discuss and articulate their own views on typical challenging situations during dissertation projects in guided group discussions.

    Schedule
    Seminar
    bi-weekly 20.02.24 – 19.03.24 Tuesday 10:15 – 11:45 209 in B6, 30–32
    bi-weekly 09.04.24 – 21.05.24 Tuesday 10:15 – 11:45 209 in B6, 30–32
    RES (Bridge Course): New Perspectives on Economics and Politics
    5 ECTS
    Lecturer(s)

    Course Type: elective course
    Course Number: RES (Bridge Course)
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisites

    Prerequisites: For each session, students need to have read the respective book in advance. (Detailed schedule will be provided in an introductory session.)

    Form of Assessment: Essay 50 %, Class Participation 50 %


    Friedman, M. (1963). Capitalism and Freedom. University of Chicago Press.
    Deaton, A. (2023). Economics in America: An Immigrant Economist Explores the Land of Inequality. Princeton University Press.
    Sandel, M. J. (2020). The Tyranny of Merit: What’s Become of the Common Good?. Penguin UK.
    Bowles, S. (2016). The moral economy. Yale University Press.
    Formal: Students need to be enrolled a PhD program at the GESS at the University of Mannheim, or the Master of Political Science.
    Required: Willingness to read, discuss, challenge, engage and think for yourself is critical for this course.

    Course Content

    We live in interesting times both, economically and politically. Many observers point to crises and uncertain developments in the economic and political world. Making sense of the nature of these challenges and pointing toward economic and political solutions for the future requires new perspectives. This is a course about the big and bold questions in economics and politics. How can or should economics and politics be organized to best serve society? What does it mean to put humans as they really are at the center of economic and political thinking? What role do morals and values, or dignity and respect, play for the way economics and politics work? What are the implications of digitalization for capitalism and freedom?

    We will try to come to grips with these questions by reading and discussing four key books on various new perspectives at the intersection between economics and politics. The aim of this course is to go as deep as we can and to get as much out of an in-class discussion of the material as possible. Willingness to acquire and read the books is a must. If you are unsure about whether or not you would want to take on the commitment of reading four books in one semester then this course is probably not the right one for you.

    Students need to be willing to read books, form their own opinions on them, and elaborate on and defend their own views in group discussions and a final essay.

    We will meet for an introductory session on Monday 4.3. at 13.45–15.15 and then meet again for a total of seven Thursday and Wednesday sessions after the Easter break: 11.4., 25.4., 2.5., 8.5., 16.5., 23.5., and 29.5. at 8.30–11.45.

    Competences acquired

    Learning outcomes: The aim of this course is to engage in intellectual dialogue, to develop a personal point of view on some of the central economic and political questions we face today, and to allow ourselves to think creatively, freely, and out of the box. After completing this course, students will have read important texts on new perspectives in economics and politics, they will have trained their ability to distill an own point of view from the writings of leading scientists, they will train their writing and discussion skills, and they will train to creatively apply what they have read in writing about the future of economics and politics in our society.

    Schedule
    Lecture
    Introduction to the Course 04.03.24 – 04.03.24 Monday 13:45 – 15:15 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 11.04.24 – 11.04.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 25.04.24 – 25.04.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 02.05.24 – 02.05.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 08.05.24 – 08.05.24 Wednesday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 16.05.24 – 16.05.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 B6, 23–25, Room A301
    Lecture 23.05.24 – 23.05.24 Thursday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409
    Lecture 29.05.24 – 29.05.24 Wednesday 08:30 – 11:45 L9, 1–2, Room 409