Sozial­wissenschaften – Master

Suchfilter

Political Science (Master)

Courses in Political Science are usually only open for incoming exchange students majoring in Political Science and for exchange students at the School of Social Sciences (Sociology, Psychology). Nominated exchange students will be contacted by their departmental exchange coordinator via e-mail at the end of November/early December (spring/summer semester) or by the end of May/early June (fall/winter semester) regarding their course choice.

Exchange students from other schools and departments may only attend classes if (a) places are left for other students (b) they have basic knowledge in political science and statistics (c) the departmental exchange coordinator explicitly approves their participation. In case of further questions, please contact: int-pol uni-mannheim.de.

Advanced Quantitative Methods (Vorlesung)
EN
Vorlesungs­typ:
Vorlesung
ECTS:
6
Kurs geeignet für:
Master
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Teilnahme:
Präsenz/Online live
Registrierungs­informationen:
Please send an email  to int-pol uni-mannheim.de to register for this course.
This course is accompanied by a mandatory tutorial.
Empfohlene Voraussetzungen:
Literatur:
Eliason, Scott R. 1993. Maximum Likelihood Estimation: Logic and Practice. Newbury Park: Sage.
Long, J. Scott. 1997. Regression Models for Categorical and Limited Dependent Variables. Newbury Park: Sage.
King, Gary. 2008. Unifying political methodology: the likelihood theory of statistical inference. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.
Prüfungs­leistung:
Homework assignments and research paper
Lektor(en):
Thomas Gschwend
Termin(e):
Mittwoch  (wöchentlich) 15.02.2023 – 31.05.202308:30 – 10:00B 244 Hörsaal; A 5, 6 Bauteil B
Beschreibung:
The goal of this course is to provide an introduction into maximum-likelihood estimation.
Comparative Government: Political Institutions and the Political Process (Vorlesung)
EN
Vorlesungs­typ:
Vorlesung
ECTS:
6
Kurs geeignet für:
Master
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Prüfungs­leistung:
Written exam
Lektor(en):
Marc Debus
Termin(e):
Dienstag  (wöchentlich) 14.02.2023 – 30.05.202310:15 – 11:45C 217 Seminarraum; A 5, 6 Bauteil C
Beschreibung:
This lecture gives an overview of selected theoretical concepts and the main research findings in the field of Comparative Government, specifically focusing on the role of political institutions and their impact for political decision-making at all stages in the political process. The course introduces a number of core themes in the comparative study of political institutions, such as electoral institutions and their effects on turnout, voting behaviour and party strategies. In addition, the lecture focuses on the impact of different institutional designs on patterns of party competition, government formation and coalition governance. In a third step, we discuss the effects of political institutions and of personal characteristics of legislators on various aspects of decision-making within parliaments and governments.
Comparative Political Behavior (Vorlesung)
EN
Vorlesungs­typ:
Vorlesung
ECTS:
6.0
Kurs geeignet für:
Master
Kurssprache:
englisch
Prüfungs­leistung:
Term Paper
Lektor(en):
Harald Schoen
Termin(e):
Montag  (wöchentlich) 13.02.2023 – 29.05.202310:15 – 11:45B 244 Hörsaal; A 5, 6 Bauteil B
Beschreibung:
The main goal of this lecture is to present an introduction to theoretical approaches, key concepts, and substantive issues in comparative political behavior. Building on a multi-level perspective, it will provide an overview of key concepts and theories in the analysis of micro-level processes of political behavior that are embedded in and feed into macro-level processes. Capitalizing on this analytical perspective, the lecture will also address major changes in the relations­hip between societal and political processes and institutions.
International Political Economy (Vorlesung)
EN
Vorlesungs­typ:
Vorlesung
ECTS:
6
Kurs geeignet für:
Master
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Teilnahme:
Präsenz/Online live
Prüfungs­leistung:
term paper, Hausarbeit
Lektor(en):
Valentin Lang
Termin(e):
Mittwoch  (wöchentlich) 15.02.2023 – 31.05.202310:15 – 11:45C 217 Seminarraum; A 5, 6 Bauteil C
Beschreibung:
IPE Vorlesung:
This lecture offers an introduction to current research topics in the field of International Political Economy (IPE). It examines how international and domestic politics interact with global flows of goods, finance, and people across national borders. After introducing what it means to study IPE in the age of globalization, the course addresses four major themes of current IPE research. We will learn about internationale trade and the chances and challenges that come with the intensifying exchange of goods across the globe. Lectures on international finance will focus on how global financial flows interact with political and economic stability, instability, and crises. We will also focus on international development and will learn about patterns of global economic inequality and development aid. The lecture will also adress the role of international institutions for the globalized economy.
International Politics (Vorlesung)
EN
Vorlesungs­typ:
Vorlesung
ECTS:
6
Kurs geeignet für:
Master
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Teilnahme:
Präsenz live
Lernziel:
The goals of this course are
  • to provide you with systematic knowledge and understanding about key debates in international politics;
  •  to apply the key debates and arguments to related questions and current events;
  •  to analyse world politics from different theoretical and methodological viewpoints;
  •  to evaluate different ideas, theories and research approaches;
  •  to foster constructive discussions and effective reading.
Prüfungs­leistung:
written exam
Lektor(en):
Sabine Carey
Termin(e):
Montag  (wöchentlich) 13.02.2023 – 29.05.202313:45 – 15:15B 244 Hörsaal; A 5, 6 Bauteil B
Beschreibung:
The security of individuals and states depends profoundly on international politics. Beyond the realm of security, structures and actors of “global governance” have been proliferating for many years. They influence crucial public policies in diverse ways. This lecture surveys academic debates on key topics of international politics, including: the sources of war, peace, and terrorism, the emergence and operation of international organizations and transnational civil society, and the making of key international policy outcomes including respect for human rights and climate policies.
Selected Topics in Comparative Politics: Hot Topics in Economics and Politics (Seminar)
EN
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
8
Kurs geeignet für:
Master
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Teilnahme:
Präsenz live
Lektor(en):
Richard Traunmüller, Oliver Spalt
Termin(e):
Freitag  (wöchentlich) 21.04.2023 – 02.06.202310:15 – 13:30
Selected Topics in Comparative Politics: Volatile, capricious, unpredictable? Studying stability and change in voting behavior (Seminar)
EN
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
8
Kurs geeignet für:
Master
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Teilnahme:
Präsenz live
Prüfungs­leistung:
Term Paper
Lektor(en):
Harald Schoen
Termin(e):
Donnerstag  (wöchentlich) 16.02.2023 – 01.06.202312:00 – 13:30B 318 Seminarraum; A 5, 6 Bauteil B
Beschreibung:
Elections are key institutions in democracies and provide opportunities to bring about changes in the partisan balance which, in turn, can affect government policies. This seminar focuses on the analysis of changes in voting behavior at the individual and aggregate level. Thereby, it tackles questions such as how and why such changes occur or not. It will address key concepts and theories, substantive and methodological issues in the field. Students will review empirical studies in the field and prepare research papers in which they analyze specific questions using available data.
Selected Topics in International Politics: Global Inequality (Seminar)
EN
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
8
Kurs geeignet für:
Master
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Teilnahme:
Präsenz/Online live
Prüfungs­leistung:
term paper, Hausarbeit
Lektor(en):
Valentin Lang
Termin(e):
Dienstag  (wöchentlich) 14.02.2023 – 30.05.202313:45 – 15:15B 143 Seminarraum; A 5, 6 Bauteil B
Beschreibung:
In this course, we study economic inequality from a political economy perspective. First, we will discuss various concepts of economic inequality and different ways to measure it. Then, we will investigate general trends in these various forms of economic inequality across the world. Second, we will discuss the scholarly literature on the determinants of economic inequality, focusing on both political and economic factors. In a third section, we will examine the literature on the implications of economic inequality as regards a variety of political and economic outcomes. The methodological focus of this seminar will be on quantative methods for causal inference.
Tutorial Advanced Quantitative Methods (Seminar)
EN
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
2.0
Kurs geeignet für:
Master
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Teilnahme:
Präsenz live
Lektor(en):
Oliver Rittmann
Termin(e):
Donnerstag  (wöchentlich) 16.02.2023 – 01.06.202310:15 – 11:45A 102 Seminarraum; B 6, 23–25 Bauteil A
Beschreibung:
This tutorial accompanies the course “Advanced Quantitative Methods” in the M.A. program in Political Science.
Tutorial Advanced Quantitative Methods (Seminar)
EN
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
2.0
Kurs geeignet für:
Master
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Teilnahme:
Präsenz live
Lektor(en):
Domantas Undzenas
Termin(e):
Donnerstag  (wöchentlich) 16.02.2023 – 01.06.202315:30 – 17:00A 102 Seminarraum; B 6, 23–25 Bauteil A

Sociology

Courses in Sociology are usually only open for incoming exchange students majoring in Sociology and for exchange students at the School of Social Sciences (Political Science, Psychology). Nominated exchange students will be contacted by their departmental exchange coordinator via e-mail at the end of November/early December (fall semester) or by the end of May/early June (Spring semester) regarding their course choice.

Exchange students from other schools and departments may only attend classes if (a) places are left for other students (b) they have basic knowledge in sociology and statistics (c) the departmental exchange coordinator explicitly approves their participation. In case of further questions, please contact: int-soc uni-mannheim.de.

Longitudinal Data Analysis (Lecture ) (Vorlesung)
EN
Vorlesungs­typ:
Vorlesung
ECTS:
6
Kurs geeignet für:
Master
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Teilnahme:
Präsenz live
Empfohlene Voraussetzungen:
Prüfungs­leistung:
 Written examination (90min.), closed-book.
Lektor(en):
Danielle Martin
Termin(e):
Montag  (wöchentlich) 13.02.2023 – 29.05.202315:30 – 17:00B 143 Seminarraum; A 5, 6 Bauteil B
Beschreibung:
The course provides a broad overview of methods used in longitudinal data analysis, with a focus on the analysis of panel data. Compared to cross-section data, using measurements of the same individuals taken repeatedly through time can lead to better causal inferences in some cases, and can also give the possibility to learn more about the dynamics of individual behavior. The first objective of this course is to discuss the advantages of panel data, and the characteristics of the structure of panel data. Then, the course will give an overview of the main models (pooled OLS, fixed effects, random effects, first-differences) and provide the tools to choose betwen these models. The course will also discuss panel generalized linear models. Finally, an overview of event history analysis will be presented.
S Elective Seminar: Action Theory and Explanation in Social Science (Seminar)
EN
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
6
Kurs geeignet für:
Master
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Teilnahme:
Präsenz live
Lernziel:
Learning Goals
After completing this seminar, students shall be able to...
•     discuss the special role action theory occupies in the social sciences.
•    define and summarise several action theories.
•    discuss similarities, differences and connections between several action theories.
•    comment on strengths and weaknesses of several action theories for social explanations.
•    evaluate substantial theories in their action theoretic foundations.
•    develop their own substantial theories.
Prüfungs­leistung:
Written term paper
Lektor(en):
Malte Grönemann, Marcel Kappes
Termin(e):
Donnerstag  (wöchentlich) 16.02.2023 – 01.06.202315:30 – 17:00C 112 Unterrichtsraum; A 5, 6 Bauteil C
Beschreibung:
This seminar reviews and discusses major branches of theories of action developed and used in the social sciences. Starting with basics in the philosophy of social science, we want to discuss the function of action theory in the explanation of social phenomena and which properties action theories should subsequently have. Over the course of the seminar, we will discuss theories of action along these properties. Finally, we want to achieve that students are able to discuss strengths and weaknesses of action theories for substantive phenomena and are in a position to design good theories for substantial questions themselves.

Course content (preliminary)
•    Methodological Individualism and Explanation in Social Science
•    Rational Choice
•    (Subjective) Expected Utility
•    Prospect Theory and Bounded Rationality
•    Desires, Beliefs, Opportunities and Cognitive Rationality
•    Heuristics, Emotions and Social Influence
•    Dual Process Theories
•    Culture
•    Habit(us) and Pragmatism
•    Norms and Roles
•    Symbolic Interactionism
•    Field Theory
S Elective Seminar: Digital Transformations of Work (Seminar)
EN
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
6
Kurs geeignet für:
Master
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Teilnahme:
Präsenz live
Prüfungs­leistung:
Required examination: written term paper (max. 5000 words), deadline: July 31, 2023
Lektor(en):
Reinhard Pollak
Termin(e):
Mittwoch  (Blocktermin) 15.02.202308:30 – 11:45
Mittwoch  (Blocktermin) 01.03.202308:30 – 11:45
Mittwoch  (Blocktermin) 15.03.202308:30 – 11:45
Mittwoch  (Blocktermin) 29.03.202308:30 – 11:45
Mittwoch  (Blocktermin) 19.04.202308:30 – 11:45
Mittwoch  (Blocktermin) 03.05.202308:30 – 11:45
Mittwoch  (Blocktermin) 24.05.202308:30 – 11:45
Beschreibung:
Digital transformations in companies, in sectors of the economy, in the labor force, and in the world of work in general are one of the most fundamental societal transformations in contemporary history. Digital transformations of work and beyond shape our daily lives and might trigger fundamental challenges to the organization of work and beyond. How do we conceptualize these digital transformations? Are these rather social or rather technical transformations? What are the main characteristics of these transformations? How does digitalization permeate the world of work? Is it a perpetuating process? How can we measure digital transformations? What are the drivers of digital transformations? And what are the consequences for individuals and families? The seminar will address these questions and offers conceptual and empirical insights in the discussion of the digital transformations of work.
S Elective Seminar: Experimental Designs in the Social Sciences (Seminar)
EN
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
6
Kurs geeignet für:
Master
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Teilnahme:
Präsenz live
Prüfungs­leistung:
presentation of the Exposé of the seminar paper (incl. peer-feedback), research design seminar paper
Lektor(en):
Sandra Morgenstern
Termin(e):
Dienstag  (wöchentlich) 18.04.2023 – 30.05.202308:30 – 11:45C 116 Seminarraum; A 5, 6 Bauteil C
Beschreibung:
Experimental research designs are called the silver bullet or ‘Königsweg’ for causal identification. In recent years, the growing interest in causal identification and mechanism testing made experimental designs a regular empirical research tool in the social sciences – most recently in political science and sociology. This seminar shall give a broad overview of the range of experimental methods such as survey, field, lab-in-the-field, and laboratory experiments. We will discuss classical and recent work, including shortcomings and best practices like transparency (open science) and ethical considerations in experimental research methods. In addition, students will learn to think critically about different (experimental) research designs and design their own experiment to answer a research question they have developed
S Elective Seminar: Field Experiments: A Hands-On Introduction (Seminar)
EN
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
6
Kurs geeignet für:
Master
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Teilnahme:
Präsenz live
Prüfungs­leistung:
Written term paper (max. 5000 words)
Lektor(en):
Nan Zhang
Termin(e):
Donnerstag  (Blocktermin) 02.03.202310:15 – 13:30
Donnerstag  (Blocktermin) 16.03.202310:15 – 13:30
Donnerstag  (Blocktermin) 30.03.202310:15 – 13:30
Donnerstag  (Blocktermin) 20.04.202310:15 – 13:30
Donnerstag  (Blocktermin) 04.05.202310:15 – 13:30
Donnerstag  (Blocktermin) 18.05.202310:15 – 13:30
Donnerstag  (Blocktermin) 01.06.202310:15 – 13:30
Beschreibung:
Field experiments are powerful tools for investigating causal claims about social phenomenon in real-life contexts.  This block seminar will provide students with a practice-based introduction to field experiments.  While we cover the logic behind experimentation and the potential outcomes framework, the heart of the course will focus around analyzing examples of actual experimental designs.  In this way, students will gain hands-on experience in navigating the myriad issues that may arise when conducting, analyzing, and interpreting field experiments.  Students will also have the opportunity to obtain feedback on their own experimental research projects.
S Elective Seminar: Learning social research through replication (Seminar)
EN
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
6
Kurs geeignet für:
Master
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Teilnahme:
Präsenz live
Literatur:
References *

A Statistical modeling
* Bauer, Gerrit, 2015: Graphical Display of Regression Results. Pp. 205–224 in: Henning Best and Christof Wolf (eds.): Handbook of Regression Analysis and Causal Inference. London: Sage.
* Best, Henning and Christof Wolf, 2015: Logistic Regression. Pp. 153–172 in: Henning Best and Christof Wolf (eds.): Handbook of Regression Analysis and Causal Inference. London: Sage.
Gelman, Andrew, und Jennifer Hill. 2007. Data Analysis Using Regression and Multilevel/Hierarchical Models. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Hox, J. J. 2010. Multilevel analysis. Techniques and applications. 2nd Edition. New York: Routledge.
Long, J. S., und J. Freese. 2014. Regression models for categorical dependent variables using Stata. 3rd Edition. College Station: Stata Press.
Long, J. Scott. 1997. Regression Models for Categorical and Limited Dependent Variables. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
* Long, J. Scott, 2015: Regression Models for Nominal and Ordinal Outcomes. 173–204 in: Henning Best and Christof Wolf (eds.): Handbook of Regression Analysis and Causal Inference. London: Sage.
Menard, Scott. 1995. Applied Logistic Regression Analysis. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
* Meuleman, Bart, Geert Loosveldt and Viktor Emonds, 2015: Regression analysis: Assumptions and Diagnostics. Pp. 83–110 in: Henning Best and Christof Wolf (eds.): Handbook of Regression Analysis and Causal Inference. London: Sage.
* Milfont, T. L., & Fischer, R. (2010). Testing measurement invariance across groups: Applications in cross-cultural research. International Journal of Psychological Research, 3(1), 111–121.
* Wolf, Christof and Henning Best, 2015: Linear Regression. Pp. 57–82 in: Henning Best and Christof Wolf (eds.): Handbook of Regression Analysis and Causal Inference. London: Sage.

B Replication
* Brandt, M. J., IJzerman, H., Dijksterhuis, A., Farach, F. J., Geller, J., Giner-Sorolla, R., van 't Veer, A. 2014: The Replication Recipe: What makes for a convincing replication? Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 50, 217–224.
* Damian, E., Meuleman, B., & Van Oorschot, W. (2019). Transparency and Replication in Cross-national Survey Research: Identification of Problems and Possible Solutions. Sociological Methods & Research. doi:DOI: 10.1177/0049124119882452
Hendrick, Clyde, 1991: Replications, Strict Replications, and Conceptual Replications: Are They Important? Pp. 41–49 in: James W. Neuliep (ed.): Replication Research in the Social Sciences: Newbury Park, CA: Sage.

* Texts marked with an asterisk as well as all texts containing research to replicate can be downloaded from the course’s space on ILIAS.
Prüfungs­leistung:
Participants should choose a published paper and try to replicate the findings reported in it using the same data. The results to be replicated often will be given in a table containing the outcome of a multivariate model. Please document each step in your attempt to replicate the findings, report and explain the decisions you had to make during data preparation and data analysis. If you fail to replicate the results please indicate possible explanations. Your paper should not exceed 5,000 words; please add your documented syntax in the appendix.
Papers should be delivered in electronic form no later than July 31, 2023.
Lektor(en):
Christof Wolf
Termin(e):
Freitag  (Einzeltermin) 17.02.202310:15 – 13:30C -108 Methodenlabor – groß/ Telefonlabor; A 5, 6 Bauteil C
Freitag  (Einzeltermin) 03.03.202310:15 – 13:30C -108 Methodenlabor – groß/ Telefonlabor; A 5, 6 Bauteil C
Freitag  (Einzeltermin) 17.03.202310:15 – 13:30C -108 Methodenlabor – groß/ Telefonlabor; A 5, 6 Bauteil C
Freitag  (Einzeltermin) 31.03.202310:15 – 13:30C -108 Methodenlabor – groß/ Telefonlabor; A 5, 6 Bauteil C
Freitag  (Einzeltermin) 12.05.202310:15 – 13:30C -108 Methodenlabor – groß/ Telefonlabor; A 5, 6 Bauteil C
Freitag  (Einzeltermin) 26.05.202310:15 – 13:30C -108 Methodenlabor – groß/ Telefonlabor; A 5, 6 Bauteil C
Freitag  (Einzeltermin) 02.06.202310:15 – 13:30C -108 Methodenlabor – groß/ Telefonlabor; A 5, 6 Bauteil C
Beschreibung:
Learning social research through replication

Description
In addition to a thorough understanding of the substantive field you are studying you need firm methodological and statistical knowledge in order to successfully conduct quantitative social research. This seminar will give you the opportunity to apply and expand your knowledge of social research by replicating published research findings.
The research that we are going to replicate was conducted with data from publicly available survey data like the European Social Survey (ESS), the International Social Survey Programme (ISSP) or the European Values Study (EVS). Data from surveys like these have several advantages: the surveys follow a repeated cross-section design, a research design particularly well suited to study social change; they are comparative surveys allowing you to compare data cross-nationally on a broad range of topics; the surveys follow rigorous methodological standards and, finally, data are available at no cost and can be downloaded from the web.
Replicating published research has the advantage that you are able to check your results against existing results. By trying to replicate previous research you learn where the original researcher has made tacit decisions not documented in the paper (e.g. defining the analysis sample, coding of variables, treatment of missing values). Replicating social research also trains you to judge the validity of research results.
In addition to these primarily pedagogical aspects replicating research is important from an epistemological point of view as well. Through replication of research by independent research groups biases in previous work can be discovered and findings can be validated (see Hendrick 1991, King 1995).
Assignment
Participants should choose a published paper and try to replicate the findings reported in it using the same data. The results to be replicated often will be given in a table containing the outcome of a multivariate model. Please document each step in your attempt to replicate the findings, report and explain the decisions you had to make during data preparation and data analysis. If you fail to replicate the results please indicate possible explanations. Your paper should not exceed 5,000 words; please add your documented syntax in the appendix.
Papers should be delivered in electronic form no later than July 31, 2023.

S Elective Seminar: Measuring and explaining xenophobic and right-wing populist attitudes (Seminar)
EN
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
6
Kurs geeignet für:
Master
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Teilnahme:
Präsenz live
Prüfungs­leistung:
term paper
Lektor(en):
Marc Helbling
Termin(e):
Mittwoch  (wöchentlich) 15.02.2023 – 31.05.202310:15 – 11:45B 317 Seminarraum; A 5, 6 Bauteil B
Beschreibung:
In the age of increasing migration and the raise of right-wing populist parties the question of how to measure and explain xenophobic and populist attitudes becomes very important. While xenophobia has already been investigated for a long time, even if it still constitutes a controversial issue how to measure it, research on populist attitudes has started only very recently. In this seminar current and innovative approaches as well as ideas for further developments will be discussed. Moreover, existing studies will be replicated to explore them more deeply.
S Elective Seminar: Migration, Integration and Ethnic Diversity (Seminar)
EN
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
6
Kurs geeignet für:
Master
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Teilnahme:
Online live
Lektor(en):
Frank Kalter
Termin(e):
Montag  (wöchentlich) 13.02.2023 – 29.05.202313:45 – 15:15A 102 Seminarraum; B 6, 23–25 Bauteil A
S Elective Seminar: Political Networks (Seminar)
EN
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
6
Kurs geeignet für:
Master
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Teilnahme:
Präsenz live
Prüfungs­leistung:
schriftliche Hausarbeit
Lektor(en):
Benjamin Rohr
Termin(e):
Montag  (wöchentlich) 13.02.2023 – 29.05.202313:45 – 15:15C 217 Seminarraum; A 5, 6 Bauteil C
Beschreibung:
What explains the rise of the Medici in 15th century Florence? Why did thousands of women join the guerilla war in 1980s El Salvador? What can online book co-purchases tell us about ideological differences between Republicans and Democrats in contemporary America? These are some of the questions we will grapple with as we explore how social scientists have applied network analysis to the study of politics. The course is designed as a general introduction to social network analysis, but it focuses heavily on examples from political sociology (and adjacent fields) as one area in which network theories and methodologies have had a great influence. We will treat network analysis both as a theoretical approach that regards relations as the basic building blocks of social life, and as a methodological toolkit for visualizing and analyzing the structure of relations. Many of these methods involve the quantitative measurement of network structures (e.g., the degree to which networks are clustered) and different positions within the network (e.g., central vs. peripheral actors). The course is organized around a set of key concepts and theoretical insights in network analysis – such as weak ties, brokerage, and diffusion – which we will apply to a variety of substantive issues ranging from recruitment into social movements to the emergence of new political identities to the nature of political action.

The best way to learn about social networks is to work with them, which is why the class has a large practical component. After developing the theoretical foundations in class discussions, students will learn how to analyze networks in a series of practical assignments. The final project will give students an opportunity to follow their own curiosity and apply the analytical tools introduced in class to an empirical context of their choosing.
S Elective Seminar: Social Determinants of Health (Seminar)
EN
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
6
Kurs geeignet für:
Master
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Teilnahme:
Präsenz live
Prüfungs­leistung:
Final papers should discuss relevant literature on a selected topic and usually focus on the same or similar aspect as the presentation. Papers should be about 4,000–4,500 words long (excluding tables and figures) and should be delivered to the instructor in electronic form (preferably as pdf-document) no later than June 12, 2023.
Lektor(en):
Malgorzata Mikucka
Termin(e):
Mittwoch  (wöchentlich) 15.02.2023 – 31.05.202313:45 – 15:15A 103 Seminarraum; B 6, 23–25 Bauteil A
Beschreibung:
What makes people healthy or ill? Individual health is surely shaped by individual decisions regarding lifestyle or use of healthcare. However, the systematic social inequalities in health are large and persist over time. People's social position plays a fundamental role in shaping their health. The characteristics of the society as a whole are likely important too. This course offers an introduction to the health consequences of people’s social position and social circumstances.

This 3-part course introduces students to selected topics in health sociology.
The first part discusses key notions of health sociology and the role of social factors in the historical development of population health.
In the second part, we tackle the topic of individual factors associated with health inequalities. We begin by reviewing the role of socioeconomic status and education and discuss the empirical patterns in light of the selection vs. social causation hypothesis. Subsequently, we address the role of gender, work, and migration in creating and sustaining health differences.
In the third part, the course shifts the focus to the macro determinants of health. We begin by reviewing the discussion on income inequalities and health and address the role of gender inequality. To address the underlying mechanisms, we look at the role of perceived (vs. objective) inequality. Subsequently, we discuss the role of social capital, and the role played by policies.
Requirements:
Students are required to attend all classes (two absences will be excused). Credits will be granted for active participation, an oral presentation, and a paper on one of the themes of the seminar.

Active participation. I expect you to attend the class regularly, read the indicated article, prepare questions and comments on the article for the discussion, and contribute to the discussion. All texts will be provided to participants through the student portal ILIAS.
In oral presentations, participants present key aspects of selected articles. Presentations (PowerPoint or similar) should last about 20 minutes, present the summary of the paper and finish with reflections or questions about the paper. Presentations should be submitted to the instructor at least four days before the presentation. Participants may apply for a presentation by writing to the instructor. Please give your first, second and third priority. Themes will be allocated to participants in order of application (first come-first served).
Final papers should discuss relevant literature on a selected topic and usually focus on the same or similar aspect as the presentation. Papers should be about 4,000–4,500 words long (excluding tables and figures) and should be delivered to the instructor in electronic form (preferably as pdf-document) no later than June 12, 2023.


Dates and Themes:


PART 1: INTRODUCTION




1
Feb 15
Overview and organization of the course




Everybody reads:
Bowling, Ann. (1997). Research Methods in Health. Investigating Health and Health Services. Buckingham: Open University Press. (CHAPTER 2)


2
Feb 22
Historical development in population health




Everybody reads & presentation:
Harper, Kristin and George Armelagos, 2010: The Changing Disease-Scape in the Third Epidemiological Transition. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 7: 675–697.

Additional reading:
McKinlay, John B. and Sonja M. McKinlay, 1977: The Questionable Contribution of Medical Measures to the Decline of Mortality in the United States in the Twentieth Century. The Milbank Memorial Fund Quarterly. Health and Society 55: 405–428.



PART 2: INDIVIDUAL CHARACTERISTICS AND HEALTH



3

March 1

Socioeconomic inequalities in health: selection vs. causation




Everybody reads & presentation:
Hu, Y., van Lenthe, F. J., Borsboom, G. J., Looman, C. W., Bopp, M., Burström, B., ... & Mackenbach, J. P. (2016). Trends in socioeconomic inequalities in self-assessed health in 17 European countries between 1990 and 2010. J Epidemiol Community Health, 70(7), 644–652.

Additional readings:
Kröger, H., Pakpahan, E., & Hoffmann, R. (2015). What causes health inequality? A systematic review on the relative importance of social causation and health selection. European Journal of Public Health, 25(6), 951–960.
Sapolsky, R. M. (2004). Social status and health in humans and other animals. Annual review of anthropology, 393–418.


4
March 8
Socioeconomic inequalities in health 2




Everybody reads:
Ross, C. E., & Mirowsky, J. (2010). Why education is the key to socioeconomic differentials in health. In Handbook of medical sociology, 6, 33–51.

Presentation and additional reading:
Clouston, S. A. P., Natale, G., & Link, B. G. (2021). Socioeconomic inequalities in the spread of coronavirus-19 in the United States: A examination of the emergence of social inequalities. Social Science & Medicine, 268, 113554. doi:10.1016/j.socscimed.2020.113554
Schmitz, A. L., & Pförtner, T. K. (2018). Health inequalities in old age: the relative contribution of material, behavioral and psychosocial factors in a German sample. Journal of Public Health, 40(3), e235-e243.


5
March 15
Gender and health




Everybody reads and presentation:
McDonough, P., & Walters, V. (2001). Gender and health: reassessing patterns and explanations. Social science & medicine, 52(4), 547–559.

Additional readings:
Rieker Patricia, P., Bird, C. E., & Lang, M. E. (2010). Understanding Gender and Health: Old Patterns, New Trends, and Future Directions. In Handbook of medical sociology, 6, 52–74.
Heise, L., Greene, M. E., Opper, N., Stavropoulou, M., Harper, C., Nascimento, M., ... & Gupta, G. R. (2019). Gender inequality and restrictive gender norms: framing the challenges to health. The Lancet, 393(10189), 2440–2454.


6
March 22
Work and health




Everybody reads and presentation:
Rietveld, C. A., van Kippersluis, H., & Thurik, A. R. (2015). Self‐employment and health: Barriers or benefits?. Health economics, 24(10), 1302–1313.
Borgmann, L. S., Kroll, L. E., Müters, S., Rattay, P., & Lampert, T. (2019). Work-family conflict, self-reported general health and work-family reconciliation policies in Europe: Results from the European Working Conditions Survey 2015. SSM-population health, 9, 100465.

Additional reading:
Benach, J., Vives, A., Amable, M., Vanroelen, C., Tarafa, G., & Muntaner, C. (2014). Precarious employment: understanding an emerging social determinant of health. Annual Review of Public Health, 35, 229–253.


7
March 29
Migration and race





Everybody reads and presentation:
Malmusi, D. (2015). Immigrants’ health and health inequality by type of integration policies in European countries. The European Journal of Public Health, 25(2), 293–299.

Additional readings:
Brzoska, P., Voigtländer, S., Spallek, J., & Razum, O. (2010). Utilization and effectiveness of medical rehabilitation in foreign nationals residing in Germany. European journal of epidemiology, 25(9), 651–660.
Phelan, J. C., & Link, B. G. (2015). Is racism a fundamental cause of inequalities in health? Annual Review of Sociology, 41, 311–330.



April 5
Easter Break



April 12
Easter Break




PART 3: COUTRY-LEVEL FACTORS AND HEALTH




8
April 19
Income inequality and health 1




Everybody reads:
Wilkinson, R., & Pickett, K. (2011). The spirit level: Why greater equality makes societies stronger. Bloomsbury Publishing USA. (Chapter 3. How inequality gets under the skin.)

Presentation:
Matthew, P., & Brodersen, D. M. (2018). Income inequality and health outcomes in the United States: An empirical analysis. The Social Science Journal, 55(4), 432–442.

Additional reading:
Pickett, K. E., & Wilkinson, R. G. (2015). Income inequality and health: a causal review. Social science & medicine, 128, 316–326.


9
April 26
Income inequality and health 2




Everybody reads and presentation:
Beckfield, J. (2004). Does income inequality harm health New cross-national evidence. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 45(3), 231–248.

Additional reading:
Truesdale, B. C., & Jencks, C. (2016). The health effects of income inequality: averages and disparities. Annual Review of Public Health, 37, 413–430.


10
May 3
Gender inequality and health




Everybody reads and presentation:
Homan, P. (2017). Political gender inequality and infant mortality in the United States, 1990–2012. Social Science & Medicine, 182, 127–135.

Additional reading:
King, T. L., Kavanagh, A., Scovelle, A. J., & Milner, A. (2020). Associations between gender equality and health: a systematic review. Health promotion international, 35(1), 27–41.


11
May 10
Mechanisms: Perceived inequality and health




Everybody reads and presentation:
Gugushvili, A., Reeves, A., & Jarosz, E. (2020). How do perceived changes in inequality affect health?. Health & Place, 62, 102276.

Additional readings:
Schwartz, J. A. (2017). Long-term physical health consequences of perceived inequality: Results from a twin comparison design. Social Science & Medicine, 187, 184–192.
Du, H., & King, R. B. (2022). What predicts perceived economic inequality? The roles of actual inequality, system justification, and fairness considerations. British Journal of Social Psychology, 61(1), 19–36.






12
May 17
Social capital and health




Everybody reads and presentation:
Jen, M. H., Sund, E. R., Johnston, R., & Jones, K. (2010). Trustful societies, trustful individuals, and health: An analysis of self-rated health and social trust using the World Value Survey. Health & place, 16(5), 1022–1029.

Additional readings:
Moore, S., & Kawachi, I. (2017). Twenty years of social capital and health research: a glossary. J Epidemiol Community Health, 71(5), 513–517.
Ehsan, A., Klaas, H. S., Bastianen, A., & Spini, D. (2019). Social capital and health: A systematic review of systematic reviews. SSM-population health, 8, 100425.
Alvarez, E. C., Kawachi, I., & Romani, J. R. (2017). Family social capital and health–a systematic review and redirection. Sociology of health & illness, 39(1), 5–29.


13
May 24
Policies and health




Everybody reads and presentation:
Coburn, D. (2004). Beyond the income inequality hypothesis: class, neo-liberalism, and health inequalities. Social science & medicine, 58(1), 41–56.

Additional readings:
Palència, L., Malmusi, D., De Moortel, D., Artazcoz, L., Backhans, M., Vanroelen, C., & Borrell, C. (2014). The influence of gender equality policies on gender inequalities in health in Europe. Social science & medicine, 117, 25–33.
Bambra, C. (2011). Health inequalities and welfare state regimes: theoretical insights on a public health ‘puzzle’. Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, 65(9), 740–745.
Bergqvist, K., Yngwe, M. Å., & Lundberg, O. (2013). Understanding the role of welfare state characteristics for health and inequalities–an analytical review. BMC public health, 13(1), 1–20.


14
May 31
Concluding discussion
S Seminar in Research Methods: AI & Machine Learning for Social Scientists (Seminar)
EN
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
6
Kurs geeignet für:
Master
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Teilnahme:
Präsenz live
Prüfungs­leistung:
written term paper (submission after the seminar ends)
Lektor(en):
Paul Bauer
Termin(e):
Mittwoch  (wöchentlich) 15.02.2023 – 31.05.202315:30 – 17:00A 102 Seminarraum; B 6, 23–25 Bauteil A
S Seminar in Research Methods: Fundamentals in Survey Design (Seminar)
EN
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
6
Kurs geeignet für:
Master
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Teilnahme:
Präsenz live
Lektor(en):
Florian Keusch
Termin(e):
Donnerstag  (wöchentlich) 16.02.2023 – 01.06.202313:45 – 15:15
S Seminar in Research Methods: Statistics, Data Science and Machine Learning in Python (instructed by Dr. Alexander Scherf) (Seminar)
EN
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
6
Kurs geeignet für:
Master
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Teilnahme:
Präsenz live
Empfohlene Voraussetzungen:
Prüfungs­leistung:
Data analysis project written in python including data transformation, visualisation and analysis.
Lektor(en):
Thomas Gautschi
Termin(e):
Freitag  (Blocktermin) 24.02.202308:30 – 13:30
Freitag  (Blocktermin) 10.03.202308:30 – 13:30
Freitag  (Blocktermin) 24.03.202308:30 – 13:30
Freitag  (Blocktermin) 21.04.202308:30 – 13:30
Freitag  (Blocktermin) 05.05.202308:30 – 13:30
Freitag  (Blocktermin) 19.05.202308:30 – 13:30
Freitag  (Blocktermin) 02.06.202308:30 – 13:30
Beschreibung:
This course is intended to show you all the major steps involved in completing a statistical analysis within the fields of exploratory data analysis and data science.

This seminar is divided into 3 parts:
First, we will go through the basics of Python and the most important libraries for data science with excursuses into „programming paradigms“ and „big data“.

Second, we will learn data exploration, data visualisation and statistical modelling with python.
Third, we will go through the basics of machine learning (supervised, unsupervised and semi-supervised) and neural networks with excususes into the fields of „computer vision“, „computer linguistics“ and „AI“.

And finally, we will apply all of this to real-world projects.
For this course, I’ve chosen several different statistical problems to be solved with regression and classification in python.

Psychology

Courses in Psychology are usually only open for incoming exchange students majoring in Psychology. Nominated exchange students will be contacted by their departmental exchange coordinator via e-mail at the end of November/early December (fall semester) or by the end of May/early June (Spring semester) regarding their course choice.

Exchange students from other schools and departments may only attend classes if (a) places are left for other students (b) they have basic knowledge in psychology and statistics (c) the departmental exchange coordinator explicitly approves their participation. In case of further questions, please contact: int-psy uni-mannheim.de.

AC1/BC1: Forschungs- und Anwendungs­techniken: Programming in R (Seminar)
EN
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
4.0
Kurs geeignet für:
Master
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Prüfungs­leistung:
A graded test (90 minutes)
Lektor(en):
Martin Brandt
Termin(e):
Freitag  (2-wöchentlich) 17.02.2023 – 02.06.202310:15 – 13:30108 CIP-Pool; B 6, 30–32 Bauteil E-F
Beschreibung:
Content:

This seminar will provide an introduction how to use R, a powerful programming language that is often used for statistical analyses, simulations, and cognitive modeling. The seminar first will provide a thorough introduction covering the core functionality such as objects, functions, data management, and plotting.
 
The last sessions of the seminar will address how to perform specific statistical analyses in R such as:
* Generalized linear mixed models with lme4 (also known as hierarchical
models)
* Simple structural equation models
* Basic set-up of Monte-Carlo simulations
* Simple cognitive modeling (e.g., signal detection or multinomial processing trees)
 
It is planned that participants practice R in homework assignments and work on small group projects such as analyzing own data, replicating a paper, or running a small simulation.
AC1/BC1(BF2/BG2): Forschungs- und Anwendungs­techniken/ Praxis der A&O-Psychologie: Psychological interventions using diary designs (Seminar)
EN
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
4.0
Kurs geeignet für:
Master
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Teilnahme:
Präsenz live
Literatur:
A more comprehensive list will be available in the first meeting. Bolger, N., Davis, A., & Rafaeli, E. (2003). Diary methods: Capturing life as it is lived. Annual Review of Psychology, 54, 579–616.
Lischetzke, T., Reis, D., & Arndt, C. (2015). Data-analytic strategies for examining the effectiveness of daily interventions. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 88, 587–622. doi:10.1111/joop.12104
Prüfungs­leistung:
Hausarbeit / Term paper
Lektor(en):
Sabine Sonnentag
Termin(e):
Donnerstag  (wöchentlich) 16.02.2023 – 01.06.202317:15 – 18:45C 217 Seminarraum; A 5, 6 Bauteil C
Beschreibung:
During recent years interventions using diary methods became increasingly popular within several fields of psychology, including health psychology and organizatinal psychology. These interventions use „intensive longitudinal designs“ to apply the treatment and to assess the data and build on daily-survey approaches that aim at „capturing life as it is lived” (Bolger, Davis, Rafaeli, 2003, p. 579). Frequent assessments typically implemented in daily-survey approaches allow for modeling change in affect, attitude, and behavior over time.
AD2: Ausgewählte Probleme der Klinischen Psychologie und Psychotherapie (Seminar)
DE
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
Kurs geeignet für:
Master
Kurssprache:
deutsch
SWS:
2
Teilnahme:
Präsenz live
Lektor(en):
Friedrich-Samuel Taubitz
Termin(e):
Dienstag  (wöchentlich) 14.02.2023 – 30.05.202310:15 – 11:45016–017 Seminarraum; L 13, 15–17
Beschreibung:
In diesem Seminar haben die Studierenden die Möglichkeit, ihre Kenntnisse in verschiedenen Störungs­bereichen und Anwendungs­feldern der Klinischen Psychologie zu vertiefen.

Insbesondere soll während des Semesters in Klein­gruppen unter Berücksichtigung aktueller Forschungs­ergebnisse eine eigene Fragestellung aus dem Bereich Grundlagen, Mechanismen und Diagnostik psychischer Störungen entwickelt, sowie Möglichkeiten zur Untersuchung dieser Fragestellung ausgearbeitet werden.

BItte beachten Sie – sofern vorhanden – die parallel­gruppen­abhängigen Inhaltsbeschreibungen.
 
AD2: Ausgewählte Probleme der Klinischen Psychologie und Psychotherapie: Psychisch krank und weltbekannt: Psychopathologie bei berühmten Persönlichkeiten (Seminar)
DE
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
Kurs geeignet für:
Master
Kurssprache:
deutsch
SWS:
2
Teilnahme:
Präsenz live
Lektor(en):
Antje Gerdes
Termin(e):
Dienstag  (wöchentlich) 14.02.2023 – 30.05.202310:15 – 11:45014–015 Seminarraum; L 13, 15–17
Beschreibung:
In diesem Seminar soll das Wissen über unterschiedliche psychische Erkrankungen und deren Behandlung vertieft werden, in dem wir uns bekannten Persönlichkeiten befassen, denen nachgesagt wird oder die sich dazu bekannt haben, an einer psychischen Erkrankung zu leiden. Anhand dieser Fälle soll die öffentliche Darstellung und der Umgang mit psychischen Erkrankungen näher betrachten werden, insbesondere aber auch ethische und berufsrechtliche Aspekte solcher „Ferndiagnosen“, sowie deren Aus­wirkungen für Betroffenen behandelt werden.
AE2: Ausgewählte Probleme der Kognitiven Psychologie (Seminar)
DE
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
4.0
Kurs geeignet für:
Master
Kurssprache:
deutsch
SWS:
2
Teilnahme:
Präsenz live
Lektor(en):
Arndt Bröder
Termin(e):
Dienstag  (wöchentlich) 14.02.2023 – 30.05.202313:45 – 15:15A 102 Seminarraum; B 6, 23–25 Bauteil A
AE2: Ausgewählte Probleme der Kognitiven Psychologie: Metakognitions­forschung (Seminar)
DE
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
4.0
Kurs geeignet für:
Master
Kurssprache:
deutsch
SWS:
2
Teilnahme:
Präsenz live
Literatur:
folgt
Lektor(en):
Arndt Bröder
Termin(e):
Donnerstag  (wöchentlich) 16.02.2023 – 01.06.202308:30 – 10:00A 102 Seminarraum; B 6, 23–25 Bauteil A
Beschreibung:
wird asap ergänzt
BC2 (auch AC1): Forschungs- und Anwendungs­techniken: Regression and Classification – Basic and Advanced Topics with Illustrations in R (Seminar)
EN
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
4.0
Kurs geeignet für:
Master
Kurssprache:
englisch
SWS:
2
Registrierungs­informationen:
ATTENTION: Should the pandemic situation allow it, we reserve the right to switch back to attendance mode during HWS 22. The digital alternative remains in place.
Literatur:
Dunn, P. K., & Smyth, G. K. (2018). Generalized linear models with examples in R. New York: Springer.
James, G., Witten, D., Hastie, T., & Tibshirani, R. (2013). An intro¬duction to statistical learning with applications in R. New York: Springer.
Prüfungs­leistung:
Master students: Written exam
​​​​​​​Doctoral reseachers (CDSS): None
Lektor(en):
Thorsten Meiser
Beschreibung:
The seminar gives an overview of
  • standard and advanced linear models (incl. multiple regression with continuous and categorical predictors, product terms, regularization methods, and nonlinear regression),
  • generalized linear models (incl. logistic regression, Poisson models, and log-linear models), and
  • supervised and unsupervised classification methods (incl. discriminant analysis, clustering methods, regression trees, and mixture models).
Regression and classification models are essential in many fields of psychological research as well as in clinical and epidemiological contexts. In this seminar, the models are introduced with their mathematical and statistical foundations, including model equations, methods of parameter estimation, and criteria of statistical inference. Statistical concepts and model applications are illustrated with simulations and through analyses of real data with R.

The language of instruction is English.
Einführung in die Gerontopsychiatrie (Seminar)
DE
Vorlesungs­typ:
Seminar
ECTS:
4.0
Kurs geeignet für:
Master
Kurssprache:
deutsch
SWS:
2
Prüfungs­leistung:
Klausur
Lektor(en):
Georg Alpers
Termin(e):
Dienstag  (wöchentlich) 14.02.2023 – 30.05.202308:30 – 10:00014–015 Seminarraum; L 13, 15–17
Beschreibung:
Die Studierenden erlernen im Seminar die Besonderheiten von Psychotherapie im gerontopsychiatrischen Kontext. Nach der Vermittlung von theoretischem Basiswissen werden praktische Fähigkeiten wie der Umgang mit kognitiven Test­verfahren oder die Anpassung von Interventions- und Gesprächsführungs­techniken an die Gruppe von Patient*innen im Alter von über 65 Jahren erprobt.

Contact School of Social Sciences

Incomings Political Science

Dr. Gledis Londo

Dr. Gledis Londo (sie/ihr)

Auslands­koordination Politik­wissenschaft
M.A. Political Science und Lehr­amt Politik­wissenschaft, Incomings Politik­wissenschaft
Universität Mannheim
Fakultät für Sozial­wissenschaften
A 5, 6
Bauteil A – Raum A 418
68159 Mannheim
Sprechstunde:
Bitte vereinbaren Sie einen Termin:
https://www.sowi.uni-mannheim.de/online-beratung/gledis-londo/

Incomings Psychology and Sociology

Janina Heker, M.A.

Janina Heker, M.A. (sie/ihr)

Auslands­koordinatorin für Soziologie und Psychologie
Universität Mannheim
Fakultät für Sozial­wissenschaften
A 5, 6
Bauteil A – Raum A 416
68159 Mannheim